Handclap, Jump Rope, and Elastics Rhymes

HANDCLAP, JUMP ROPE, AND ELASTICS RHYMES

This page is the first of two Cocojams pages that contain selected examples, videos, and comments about hand clap rhymes, jump rope (skipping) rhymes, and elastics rhymes.

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 for selected examples of hand clap, jump rope, and elastic rhymes whose names begin with a letter from M-Z.

Ms Azizi Powell, Founder / Editor
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Latest revision: April 1, 2014

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HOW EXAMPLES ARE PRESENTED ON THIS PAGE
Jump rope rhymes and elastics rhymes will be identified by that category's name.* All other rhymes in this section are hand clap rhymes.

*Many jump rope rhymes are also used as ball bouncing rhymes. For a description of elastic jumping (also known as "French skipping" and other names), see this comment that I re-posted on this Mudcat Discussion Forum thread about elastics:
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=103#2345619

You'll notice that Cocojams playground rhyme pages contain multiple versions of certain rhymes. I'm interested in posting multiple versions of rhymes as a way of documenting the way that the words of a particular rhyme may change in different geographical locations or among different populations within the same city, state, or nation. Posting multiple examples of the same rhyme also documents the way that the words of a rhyme may change over time.

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SOURCES OF RHYMES THAT ARE FEATURED ON THIS PAGE
Some of the rhymes featured on this page are from my childhood memories, and/or from my collection efforts (mostly among African Americans in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1990s to date).

Some of the rhymes on this page were sent in by Cocojams visitors. See the information below about where & how to send rhyme examples for possible posting on this site.

A few rhymes on this page are from certain hard to find books. In each of those cases, I have included the title and publisher of those books and the editors' name/s. I've included those examples to help increase readers' familiarity with those examples and with those books. if I am asked to remove examples featured here from any source, I will do so.

Most of the rhymes that are featured on this page are re-posted from other websites.
I include rhyme examples from other websites to increase awareness about these rhymes, to facilitate the identification of these rhymes, and to help facilitate additional folkloric research of contemporary English language playground rhymes.

Hyperlinks to the source website for these examples are always posted on this page. If I am asked to remove examples featured here from any source, I will do so.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND THANKS
My thanks to all those who have sent in rhyme examples. My thanks also to the moderators or editors of the websites from which rhymes are reposted. Special thanks to http://www.mudcat.org/threads.cfm ; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php10/1/2003 *, and http://www.inthe80s.com/rhymes.shtml for permission to repost selected examples from their websites.

* Note: Links to http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php now are no longer viable. For folkloric purposes, I'm retaining the referent Octoblog that was used for that website with examples from that blog. If anyone has information about the blog that used to be called The Octoblog, Whee! Blog, or blog oftheoctopuses, please contact me at cocojams17@yahoo.com . Thanks.

INTERNET SOURCES OF VIDEOS
Video examples of many of the rhymes featured on this page are posted below a version of those rhymes. I've also posted additional playground rhymes/chants videos at the end of this page. New videos are added periodically. Hyperlinks & citations are provided with each video.

All videos embedded on Cocojams .com are from http://www.youtube.com/ . Videos are posted on this site for educational, entertainment, aesthetic, historical, and folkloric purposes. All rights to these videos remain with their respectful owners.

I sincerely thank all the video uploaders whose videos I have reposted on Cocojams.com. I also sincerely thank YouTube.com for helping to make these videos available to the general public. If an uploader of a video sends a request to cocojams17@yahoo.com for me to remove his or her video from Cocojams.com, I will do so. Please note that links to YouTube videos or to other online resources may not remain viable. Please also be aware that comments posted on YouTube viewer comments threads may not be suitable for children.

SENDING IN EXAMPLES OF RHYMES
Please send examples of hand clap, jump rope (skipping), ball bouncing, and/or elastic rhymes to cocojams17@yahoo.com for possible posting on this page.

Examples are posted for their creative, folkloric value.

Your email address is never posted or shared.

Please be aware that by sharing your examples or comments with me, you are giving me permission to include it in a book or in any other off-line publication.

Although it is not required, please include information about how this rhyme is performed. Also, for the sake of folkloric research, please include the following demographical information: where you learned the rhyme (please include the city & state if within the USA, and the nation, if outside the USA); when you learned this rhyme (year or decade such as 2008, the 1990s, or the mid 1970s); and who performed this rhyme (age, gender, race/ethnicity).

Thanks to all those who have sent in examples for possible posting on Cocojams! Special thanks to all those who remember to include performance information and demographical information (particularly location, and when the rhyme was performed) along with the text of the rhyme itself.

COMMENTS ABOUT THE FEATURED RHYMES
Examples of rhymes & cheers are almost always posted the way that readers send them to this website. Some of these examples have typos and other accidental spelling errors or have text messaging, slang, or otherwise purposely misspelled words & phrases. Many of these examples are written without any capitalization at the beginning of a line or punctuation mark at the end of line. Posting examples written this way may result in difficulty understanding the examples. However, I believe that it is important to keep the examples' original form for authenticity's sake and as a means of showcasing the examples' "flavor".

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EXAMPLES OF CHILDREN'S HAND CLAP, JUMP ROPE, AND/OR ELASTIC RHYMES
(Numbers and A-L)

NUMBERS
2 4 6 11 Ready go.
2 4 6 11
Gotty gotty *
I 1
1 2 3 4 5 6
1 1
[continue until someone fails to clap or claps wrong]*
-warawaraghana on Nov 26, 2006

*This is a phonetic approximation. I'm not sure if it's correct.

Editor:
From the uploader's name, I take it that this clapping game is from Ghana, West Africa and is created by children who have learned how to count in English.

*This is my sense of the play instructions: start from the beginning with those who mess up stepping out of the game. Continues until there is just two clappers, with the last clapper the winner.

Here's that video:

2 4 6 11

Uploaded by warawaraghana on Nov 26, 2006

Clapping song

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ABC (Version #1)
A.B.C.
It’s easy as 1.2.3.
My momma takes care of me.
My father don’t yell at me.

Caught you with your boyfriend.
Naughty, Naughty.
Didn’t do the dishes.
Lazy, Lazy.
Ate all the candy
Greedy, greedy.
Jumped out the window.
Man, you’re crazy!
- anonymous woman (White; Washington, D. C), collected by Azizi Powell,1999; posted on Cocojams on 2/26/2006

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A B C (Version #2)
A B C
it's easy as 1 2 3
yer mama's got funky feet
oosh ahsh I want a piece of squash
sqhash too sweet I want a piece of meat
meat too tough I wanna ride a bus
Buss too full I wana buy a bull
bull too black I want my money back
money too green I want a limosine
Limosine too long
I wanna write a song
song too old I want a pot of gold
gold to yella' I wanna kiss a fella
fella too fat
and that's the end of that

or
gold too yellow I'll Tickle you with a feather (and you reach out and try to tickle the person who you're playing with)

that's all I can remember right now...
-Reebob; 2/12/2004; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300&messages=155; Children's Street Songs

Editor:
See other examples of this rhyme in the "Oh My I Want A Piece Of Pie"
section below. Also see other examples of this rhyme on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=26926 Lyr Req: Oh my, I want a piece of pie

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A B C (Version #3)
I was reading Oh Ah in the handclaps and it sounds really similar to something my friends and I use to play. I dont think its different because I live in Hawaii.
A-B-C, Its easy as 1-2-3,
My momma takes care-of-me,
My daddy says, Oh Ah, I wanna piece of pie,
Pie to sweet, I wanna piece of meat,
Meat to tough, I wanna ride the bus,
Bus to full, I wanna go to school,
School to hard, I wanna jeely-bean,
Jelly-Bean to green, Indiana Jones dont move or talk.
-Kaylen ; 3/27/2007

Here's a video of two girls playing this handclap game and other games:

Cool Hand Games

Uploaded by jordan10526 on Jul 18, 2010

MK & IC -- summer, 2010

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A B C (Version #4)
abc, easy as 123,
my momma takes care of me,
my daddy watches mtv,
ooh ahh i want a piece of pie,
pie to sweet i wanna piece of meat,
meat to rough i wanna ride a bus,
bus too full i wanna ride a bull,
bull not black i want my money back,
money back too green
i wanna jelly bean, jelly bean not cooked
i wanna read a book,
book not read i wanna go to bed,
bed not made i want some lemonade,
lemonade too sour
i wanna take a shower,
shower too cool i wanna go to school,
school too dumb i wanna suck my thumb,
thumb to dirty i wanna ride a birdie,
birdie too slow and thats all i know,
so close your eyes and count to ten,
whoever messes up starts all over again,
12345678910...
noone messed up so thats the end!
-elle ; 4/3/2007

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123 (Version #5)
123 my mama takes care of me
my daddy sings do re me
oh ah i wanna piece of pie
pie too sweet i wanna piece of meat
meat too tough i wanna ride a bus
bus too full i wanna ride a bull
bull too mean i wanna jelly bean
jelly bean too red i wanna go to bed
bed not made i want some lemonade
lemonade too sour i wanna take a shower
shower to cold i wanna piece of gold
gold too pretty i wanna kiss a kitty
kittty too fat and thats the end of that
hey tomboy hey tomboy meet me on the corner on a saturday night
we can wiggle we can jiggle we can dance all night
close your eyes and count to 10 and if u mess up start over again
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
- Guest, sophie ;
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=26926#2593100 ; Lyr Req: Oh my, I want a piece of pie ; April 04, 2009

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ABC (Version #6)
ABC, easy as 123, my daddy drank Cocafee(don’t ask what that is) right off of my feet.
That’s how nasty people can be.
Judge, judge, call the judge!
Mama’s gonna have a baby, a sweet little choc-o-late baby!
If it’s a boy, I’ll give it a toy.
If it’s a girl, I’ll give it a curl.
If it’s a twin, I’ll give them a spin.
Wrap it up in toilet paper,
Send it down the elevator.
First floor, STOP.
Second floor, STOP.

And then it would just go on until someone screwed it up….usually me.
- ChloeMireille ; http://kateharding.net/2009/10/02/miss-lucy-had-friday-fluff/ Shapely Prose; October 2, 2009

Editor:
This rhyme may have originated as a child's expression of antagonism toward a new addition to her family, since that might mean less attention from her parents. If so, it's likely that most children don't realize that this rhyme means that.

"Cocafee" is probably a folk processed form of the word "coffee". And the "chocolate baby" may have originated as a referent to a Black baby.

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ABC (Version #7)
ABC
Yo' mama drink cold coffee.
Yo' papa's on L-I-C.
Get offa my feet.
That's how nasty people can be.
Fudge, fudge, fudge.
The doctor called the judge.
Mama's havin' a baby.
Papa's goin' crazy.
If it's a boy,
I give it a toy.
If it's a girl,
I give it a curl.
If it's a twin,
I give it a spin.
Wrap it up in toilet paper,
Put it down the elevator.
First floor, stop, your mother.
Second floor, stop, your father.
Third floor, stop.
Now you better watch out
'cause S-T-O-P spells stop."

On the final word, "Stop," both players would freeze.

[Handclapping game learned in Summit, New Jersey, when I was about 11, from an African American girl friend of mine who lived in Orange, New Jersey. It must have been ~1990 or 1991.]
- Anonymous, September 25. 2012
-snip-
This version of "ABC" combines verses from "Fudge Fudge Call The Judge". Examples of that rhyme are found below.

Btw, this is the earliest version of that rhyme that I've read or hear to date. Thank you Anonymous!

Here's an additional comment that Anonymous sent in:
" [My memory of] the clapping game for the “A-B-C” song is clear. The clapping game involved slapping your right hip, and snapping your fingers and clasping hands. I am attaching a sound file of the song as I remember it.

As I remember it, “L-I-C” was a reference to liquor... I interpreted the song as a rather grim story".

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ABC HIT IT
Examples of this rhyme are found on Cocojams' Schoolyard Taunts page http://cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts

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A-B-C-TOGETHER

My youngest sister is helping me with this post. She's just left Primary 7 (she's 12, in other words), so her 'help' should contain pretty modern versions...

My sister's version of "A-B-C-Together" goes:

Put your hands together, fingers pointing at the person opposite.
A (slap backs of left hands together, own palms still joined)
B (same with the back of right hands)
C (A but stay together, rather than slapping past)
Together (each clap right hand against own left hand)
Up (Right hands clap above the 'together' hands)
Together (bring back together)
Down (Right hands clap below the 'together' hands)
Together (bring back together)
Back (slap backs of hands together with other person, palms facing you)
To front (clap palms with the other person [ie, above^ but backwards])
knee (touch knee with right hand)
To toe (touch foot with right hand)
Wiggle your bum (basically, do 'the Twist')
Around you go (spin on the spot)
Pull the chain (make a 'pulling chain' action)
Start again.
-Viracocha [Sian] & her sister; (Portlethen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 2007);http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18352&messages=48 Lyr Req: Playground songs; 8/03/2007

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ACKABAKA
See entries for "My Mother, Your Mother" on Cocojams's second Hand Clap rhymes page: http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2

Also, visit Cocojams' Counting Out Rhyme page http://www.cocojams.com/content/choosing-it-rhymes for additional examples of these rhymes.

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AH BEEP BEEP
Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts for examples of this rhyme.

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ALI BALI BEE (also known as "Coulter's Candy")
Click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/864 to find this video. examples of lyrics, and selected viewer comments. Also click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-parodies-0 to find a parody of this song.

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A LADY ON ONE FOOT (Jump Rope Rhyme)
A lady on one foot one foot one foot
a lady on two foot two foot two foot
a lady on three foot three foot three foot
a lady on four foot four foot four foot
a lady on five foot five foot five foot
a lady on six foot six foot six foot
a lady no foot no foot no foot.
- De'Azia, age 8, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 3/24/2006

Editor:
When I was growing up, we did this up to "four foot". We started out
with "Lady on two foot". This meant jumping with two feet touching the ground. "Lady on one foot" meant jumping with on foot touching the ground. "Three foot" meant jumping with two feet and while touching the ground with one hand without missing. "Four foot" meant jumping with two feet while touching the ground with both hands without missing. Then we'd say "Jump out" which might be what "no foot" means here. I'm not sure what "five foot" & "six foot" means. However, the explanation for "five feet" that is found on this page with the rhyme "Blue Bell" (try to touch all hands and butt to the ground in one jump) may also be what "five feet" means in this "Lady On One Foot" rhyme. But if so, then what does "six feet" mean? Three jumpers?

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ALL IN TOGETHER (Jump Rope Rhyme) (Version #1) (Jump rope rhyme)
All in together
Every kind of weather
January, February,
March, April,
May, June July,
August, September, October,
November, December
{Jump out on your birthday month}
-various sources, including Azizi Powell's childhood memories (Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s)

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ALL IN TOGETHER (Version #2) (Jump rope rhyme)
All in together girls
Mighty fine weather girls
When is your birthday Please run out
January February March April May June July August September October November December
Bluebells, cockleshells
Eevie ivy over
My mother sent me to the store
And this is what she sent me for
Salt Vinegar Mustard Pepper. (turn rope quickly on "pepper")
- http://www.homeschool.co.uk/resource/skipping-rope-jump-rope-hopscotch-s... Dec 13 2004

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ALL THE GIRLS IN FRANCE (Jump Rope Rhyme)
All the girls in France
Do the Hula Hula dance
And they don't wear pants
When they do the Hula dance.
-various sources, including Azizi Powell's memories of Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s

Editor:
I remember singing this while jumping rope or bouncing ball. But my clearest memories of this song is dancing like a "hula hula" girl from Hawaii while I sang this song. There may have been other words to this rhyme, but I can't remember them. I remember thinking it was kinda risque' to sing about people dancing without wearing pants. I thought the words referred to "panties" (underwear) and not pants like jeans.

See similar rhymes on this page such as "In The Land of France" and "In The Land of Mars." Also, see this Mudcat thread for additional examples & information about this family of rhymes:
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055&messages=43 Folklore: Play Ground Hand Jives

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AMA LAMA KUMA LA VISTA
What about the song that goes like this..

Flea..
Flea fly..
Flea Fly Flow.
Ama lama kuma lama kuma la vista,
Oh oh oh oh not the vista vista,
issilini dissilini
Oo aa aa malini, akaraka, cukara ich bam boom,
ip diddly ope en bope why not shout and bout
.......ssssssss.... Bang!

Anybody else know this?..."
-Danny; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php10/1/2003 ; 10/1/2003

Editor:
My comments about the "Como La Vista" family of children's handclap rhymes are given below the example entitled "Abalata Cubalata" which is found on this page.

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AMEENA SUPERSTINA
Ameena *clap clap clap*
Superstina *clap clap clap*
Lazy boys *clap clap clap*
Super girls *clap clap clap*
*now faster*
Ameena
Supersteena
Lazy boys
Super girls
S
T
O
P
STOP
*no one moves*
The first to move loses and the last to stay in one position without moving wins.
-Guest, NK; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097&messages=139 Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?; March 18, 2011

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APPLES ON A STICK
Editor: Examples of this rhyme are posted regardless of their title (i.e. their first words).

APPLES ON A STICK (Version #1)
I used to spend recesses against the wall for jumping out of the swings in mid-air, and playing tag on the tornado slide, and the girls jumped the rope on the wide walkway there. Here [is one rhymes} that I recall hearing, but the words may be out of order, as this was a while ago.

Apples on a stick, make me sick (slick?).
make my arms (heart?) go two-four-six!
It's not because i'm dirty
It's not because i'm clean
It's not because I kiss the boys
behind a magazine (behind a _____ machine?)
Hey girls, let's have fun!
Here comes a cop with his (vest?) undone!
He can shammey he can shake
He can do the hoochie-koo
But I bet a dollar he can't catch you!
One, two, three, etc.....

Chanted to a double jumprope, I heard this on the schoolyard in Spirit Lake, Iowa around 1982-5. The count continued untill the jumproper missed a lick.
-Neighmond (Chaz J), http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=56361
Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games

Editor: This version is performed while jumping rope (skipping rope). However, like other rhymes that were chanted while jumping rope, it appears that now (in the USA) this rhyme is mostly chanted while doing hand clap routines.

Here's a video of two young girls doing various handclap games including "Apple On A Stick" and "Miss Susie Hand A Steamboat":

Granddaughters hand claps

Posted by joannjohnson
December 22, 2006

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #2)
Apples on a the stick
make me sick.
Make my heart go
Two forty six
Not because I’m dirty
Not because I’m clean
Not because I kissed a boy
Behind a magazine.
-multiple sources, including girls ages 7-10 years; Millview Acres Housing Development (Clairton, Pennsylvania) 2002; collected by Azizi Powell, 2002

Editor:
I have found this rhyme written separately or as the beginning of a longer rhyme. The girls in Millvue Acres did intricate partner handclap rhymes while chanting this rhyme.

Here's another video of two girls chanting "Apple On A Stick" while doing handclaps:

cayleyyyyy
November 16, 2006

"Apple on a stick, Makes me sick, Makes my heart beat 2-4-6. Not because you're dirty, Not because you're clean, Just 'cause you kiss the boys behind the magazine... And so on!!"

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #3)
The space goes
apple on a stick just makes me sick make my tummy go 2 4 6
not because im hunrgy
not because im clean
just because i kiss a boy behind the magazine
hey girls lets have some fun
here comes (name) with his pant undone
he can wiggle he can wobble he can do the twist
but most of all he cant do this close your eyes and count ten if you messs up start ova again
1, 2, 3, 4, ...
- Cece http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php; 10/9/2005

Editor:
In my opinion, the word "space" in the introductory phrase "The space goes" was originally the word "spades". "Spades" is a colloquial, and often derogatory referent for Black people (African Americans). I believe that this introductory term means that the rhyme is being recited or performed the way that Black people did it.

See "Down Down Baby" (from the American movie titled "Big") below for an example of another rhyme that contains the introductory phrase "The space goes".

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #4)
Apple on a stick
makes me sick
makes my heart beat 2-46
not because you're dirty
not because you're clean
not because you kissed the boy
behind the magazine
hey girls you wanna have some fun
cause here come a lady with a big fat bum
she can wibble she can wobble
she can even do the splits
but i bet ya i bet ya she can't do this
close your eyes and count to ten
if you muck it up you're a big fat hen.
1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10
(if you didn't muck up)
we didn't muck it up
so that's the end. we're best friends.
(if you did muck up)
we mucked up and that's the end
so start again cause we're not best friends.
-Allie; 2/15/2007

Editor:
"Bum" means "butt". "Muck it up" means "to mess up"/ "to make a mistake".

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #5)
this is a hand clap very similar to others!
apple on a stick
it makes me sick makes my heartbeat...246
not because im dirty
not because i kissed a boy behind a magazine
hey girls having lots of fun
(your two names) are having lots of fun
we can do the rumble
we can do the splits
bet ya bet ya can't do this
close your eyes and count to ten
whoever mucks it up is a big fat hen
(count to ten if you muck it up say "
(who mucked it up name)so thats the end "
if no one mucks it up you say " no one mucked it up so thats the end"
-Annie; 5/30/2008

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #6)
candy stix make me sick
make my heart go 246
not because im dirty
not because im clean
not because i kissed a boy behind a magazine
hey girls lets have some fun
here comes *name* with his pants undone
close your eyes and count to ten
whoever stops first has to ki-iss him.!
-Guest, 17yr old kid at heart:); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300&messages=171 ; Children's Street Songs; July 20, 2010

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #7)
apples on a stick
sure make me sick
makes my heart go 246.
not because i'm dirty not because i'm clean
not because i kiss a boy behind a magizine,
hey look over there
hear come ur granny in her underwear
she can wibble she wobble
she can do the splits
i bet ya 5 dollars she can't do this
close ur eyes and count to ten
if u mess up
you gotta kiss her boyfreind 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10. :D
-Guest J.W.; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=115045&messages=106 Not Last Night But The Night Before-rhyme ; December 12, 2010

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #8)
I stumbled upon your website today and I just thought I would throw in my version of Apples on a Stick. I learned this in my elementary school in Live Oak, Florida around 1996. It looks like it’s a combination of Apples on a Stick and Mailman Mailman that I actually learned. This was performed with both African American and Caucasian children.

Apples on a stick just make me sick
Makes my heart go 2-46
Not because I’m dirty
Not because I’m clean
Not because I kissed a boy behind a magazine
Hey Tomboy! You wanna have a fight?
Meet me on the corner on a Saturday night.
I can wiggle, I can wobble, I can even do the twist.
Most of all I can kiss kiss kiss
K-I-S-S spellllllls kiss.

Like another person submitted, during the K-I-S-S part, you would inch your feet out and eventually you would be doing the splits – if you could. I remember I always won because I did ballet :)
-Mary Beth T, April 2, 2013

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #9)
this one is different from my version,

apples on a stick they make me sick
they make my heart go 246 246
not because im dirty not because im clean
not because I kissed a boy behind the magazine
so come on girls lets have some fun
here comes jhonny with his pants un done
he can wiggle he can wobble
he can do the twist
but I bet you five dollars he cant do this
close your eyes and count to ten
whoever messes up has to marry him
12345678910
- whatup chic, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sygUDQzShdM , "Apple On A Stick", 2013
-snip-
[reformatted for this page]

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #9)
The one I know is:

"Apple on a stick you make me sick
you make my heart go 2/46
its because im dirty its not because im clean
its not because I kissed a boy behind a magizeen.
Heyy boy! You wanna have a fight?
meet me at the club on a saturday night.
If you say 0 your otta the game
so lets get ready for the chu chu train."

And you keep counting intill someone says 0.
- Caitlin Callahan, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sygUDQzShdM , "Apple On A Stick", 2013
-snip-
[reformatted for this page]

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APPLES ON A STICK (Version #11)
I go

apple on a stick it makes sick
makes my heart beat 2 4 6
not because Im dirty not I'm clean
not because I kissed a boy behind a magazine
girls girls just wanna have fun
here comes Julie with a pimple on her bum
she can do the edible wobble
she can even for the splits
but I bet she can't do this
close your eyes and count to ten
if you mess it up your not my friend
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
so you didn't / did your still / not my friend
that's the end!
-Ellie Barnes, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sygUDQzShdM , "Apple On A Stick", 2013
-snip-
[reformatted for this page]

****
APPLES ON A STICK (Version #12)

Apple on a stick makes me sick
makes my heart beat 2 46,
not because your dirty not because your clean,
not because you kissed a boy behind a magazine girls,
boys having fun,
here comes the girl with the blueberry bum
she can wibble she can wobble
she can do the splits
but I bet ya I bet ya
she can't do this
count to ten with your eyes shut
if you mess up start again
1234 5678 910,
You didn't mess up
now she is your girl friend
That's the end of Chapter 10
Bam
-LivingHealthyAus, Posted on 2013 for the video that she published [reformatted for this page]

Here's that video:

" Apple on a Stick " Hand clapping game

LivingHealthyAusPublished on Nov 2, 2012

Louise and Reese playing " Apple on a Stick " Hand clapping game

****:

APPLE TART (Jump Rope Rhyme)
In my school in Sydney, we did a skipping rhyme:
Apple tart,
Apple tart,
Tell me the name of your sweetheart,
A B C D E etc

The letter on which you missed the rope was the first letter of your "boyfriend's" name.
-Clownfish (Australia); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?; August 1, 2006

****
A SAILOR WENT TO SEA (Version #1)
A sailor went to sea sea sea
To see what he could see see see
And all that he could see see see
Was the bottom of the deep blue sea sea sea

A sailor went to chop chop chop
A sailor went to knee knee knee
A sailor went to oohwhatchakaw
A sailor went to stand by me

Its more to it than this..
-Cheryl G.; electronic message to her aunt Doris H. who forwarded this and other rhymes to Azizi Powell,
11/18/2004

Here's one handclap routine for this rhyme:

simpseng
March 14, 2007

"performance for song" A sailor went to sea"

****
A SAILOR WENT TO SEA (Version #2)
And an Oz version of
A sailor went to sea sea sea
to see what he could sea sea sea
and all that he could sea sea sea
was the bottom of the deep blue sea sea sea.

went (to one clapping pattern)

A sailor went to Diz Diz Diz
to see what he could Diz Diz Diz
and all that he could Diz Diz Diz
was the bottom of the deep blue Diz Diz Diz.

then (to another clapping pattern)

A sailor went to knee knee knee
to see what he could knee knee knee
and all that he could knee knee knee
was the bottom of the deep blue knee knee knee.

then (to yet another clapping pattern)

A sailor went to land land land
to see what he could land land land
and all that he could land land land
was the bottom of the deep blue land land land.

and finally (to a combination of all three clapping patterns)

A sailor went to Disneyland
to see what he could Disneyland
and all that he could Disneyland
was the bottom of the deep blue Disneyland.
-Rowan; (Australia), http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18352&messages=48 Lyr Req: Playground songs; 8/02/2007}

****
A SAILOR WENT TO SEA (Version #3)
At my elementary school in Willoughby Hills, Ohio (far east suburbs of Cleveland, white, middle & working class) about 1965-70, the girls had some additional verses to the handclap rhyme "A sailor went to sea sea sea":

A sailor went to sea sea sea
To see what he could see see see
But all that he could see see see
Was the bottom of the deep blue sea sea sea

A sailor went to Amsterdam
To see what he could Amsterdam
But all that he could Amsterdam
Was the bottom of the deep blue Amsterdam

[I think there were a few more verses with three-syllable place names, but the only ones I can think of now don't seem quite right. Establishing the three-syllable pattern makes the next verse funnier.]

A sailor went to Chiiii-na
To see what he could Chiiii-na
But all that he could Chiiii-na
Was the bottom of the deep blue Chiiii-na

A sailor went to Frank Frank Frank
To see what he could Frank Frank Frank
But all that he could Frank Frank Frank
Was the bottom of the deep blue Frank Frank Frank

A sailor went to En En En
To see what he could En En En
But all that he could En En En
Was the bottom of the deep blue En En En

A sailor went to Stein Stein Stein
To see what he could Stein Stein Stein
But all that he could Stein Stein Stein
Was the bottom of the deep blue Stein Stein Stein

A sailor went to Frankenstein
To see what he could Frankenstein
But all that he could Frankenstein
Was the bottom of the deep blue Frankenstein

The handclap pattern, of which I've forgotten the details, was the same for every verse. It was usually done in pairs, but could be done by any number in a circle. Sometimes after completing all the verses it would be repeated at increasing speed until our hands couldn't keep up or we dissolved with laughter. I found your site through your postings on Mudcat.org, and it's brought back a lot of memories. Lots of stuff here is familiar, and I'll post the versions I remember as I get time. Thanks so much.
-Elizabeth ; 2/17/2008

Editor:
Elizabeth, thank you for sending in that version of "A Sailor Went To Sea Sea Sea". Thanks also for remembering to include performance instructions and demographical information {elementary school, race, economic class, and geographical location}. I'm glad that you found this website through http://www.mudcat.org/threads.cfm. I look forward to the possibility of you sharing more rhymes with Cocojams!

For those who aren't familiar with the website that Elizabeth mentioned, Mudcat is an online, international folk and blues discussion forum. There are a number of threads (series of discussions) on that forum on children's rhymes. One such thread is http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034&messages=153 Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky. Hyperlinks to other children's rhymes threads posted to that website can be found on that page. Membership is free at that forum, and guests can also posts examples and comments.

****
A SAILOR WENT TO SEA (Version #4)
played elastics. I think we called it Ching Chang. I went to a Catholic school in the US from 1958 to 1965. Also, we added four versus to the sailor ryhmm.

A sailor went to sea, sea, sea...(hold hand above eyebrow and look around)
A sailor went to knee, knee, knee...(pat knees)
A sailor went to chop, chop, chop...(chopping motion on the arm)
A sailor went to oowatchica...(bend at the knees and circle the hips)
then we would do them all together quickly
A sailor went to sea, chop, knee, owatchica...

Who knows who might have added the versus. It could have been one of my classmates.
-Guest,Paula; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=65824&messages=29 Aussie Childrens' School Song origin?; January 13, 2011

Editor:
Note that the poster is from the USA and not Australia, regardless of the title of that discussion thread.

****
AWAY IN FRANCE
This song I learned when I was a school girl in Oxon Hill, Maryland in the 1960s:

Away in France where the alligators dance,
One wouldn't dance so they kicked him in the pants,
The pants he wore cost a dollar ninety-four --
And you can get them in your grocery store!

(I remember my father singing a variation about Away in France where the women wear no pants, away in France where the men do the same", but Mom snapped, "Douglas, don't be vulgar!", so that's all I remember.)
-Ann N.; 4/29/2007

Editor: This rhyme is actually part of a large family of the "There's A Place In France". See examples of those rhymes and the very closely related "There's A Place In Mars" and "There's A Place In Oz" rhymes in the "T" page of Cocojams Handclap Rhymes. All of those rhymes are also very closely connected to "In The Land of France" examples. See some of those examples on the "I" page of Cocojams' Handclap Rhymes.

****
BALLERINA (Jump Rope Rhyme)
Ballerina ballerina
Turn around
Ballerina ballerina
Touch the ground
Ballerina ballerina
Double quick
Ballerina ballerina
Do the splits!

{The trick was to do it all skipping.}
-Viracocha [Sian] ; (from Portlethen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in the early 1990s),http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18352&messages=48 Lyr Req: Playground songs; 7/30/2007

Editor:
"Skipping" here means jumping rope.

****
BANANA, BANANA, BANANA IN (Elastics Jumping)
Banana, Banana, Banana, in
Banana, banana, banana, out
Banana, banana, banana, on
Banana, banana, banana, out

(On banana, you straddle one elastic - ie one leg in, one leg out, so that you are juming to and fro over the elastics, on "in" you jump inside the elastic, the first "out" involves straddling the elastic with both legs out, whereas the last out was jumping clear of the elastic to finish. Oh and "on" meant you had to land on the elastics.
-Guest; 2/14/2008; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=98; Child's Game: Elastics

Editor:
"Elastics" is one name for a children's jumping game that is played with long rubber bands or string instead of one rope or two ropes. Throughout many English speaking countries, or English speaking populations in various countries, this jumping game has also been called "Chinese Jump Rope", "French Skipping", "German Skipping", "African Jump Rope", "Yogi", or other names. Rhymes are usually chanted while playing this game. Sometimes the words of the rhymes indicated how the player was supposed to jump.

Tem42 on 9/21/2006, posting on http://everything2.com/index.pl?node_id=1841337 provided this explanation of one way elastics is played: "You will need three players and a loop of string, rubber bands, or elastic rope. Two players stand inside either end of the loop with their ankles spread slightly apart, the loop pulled tight so as to raise it 3-4 inches off the ground. The third person hops over this rope in a predetermined pattern. If they hop the pattern correctly, the loop is raised up to knee level, and they try the pattern again. Next is hip level (AKA hipsies or underbums); obviously you are not hopping at this point, but leaping. (I have never played with anyone whose hip level was higher than mid-thigh on me, but even so I was exhausted after one round)...The loop of string may be crossed in the center (making a figure eight), allowing for more complex patterns. It may be held higher at one end than the other. Turns and spins may also be added. Footwork can get pretty fancy, especially among older kids. "

Click on that website for more information about jumping elastics. Also, click on the Mudcat Discussion Forum hyperlink presented above for another discussion about "elastics" and for additional examples of rhymes that children (mostly girls) chanted while playing that game. Additional examples of "elastics" rhymes are also found on this Cocojams page.

Do you remember playing elastics or do you play it now? If so, send examples & information about this game to cocojams17@yahoo.com

****
BANANA SPLIT (Version #1)
Banana Split,
It makes me sick.
Oogah laggah
Oogah laggah
2, 4, 6
If you say 5 you’re out of the game.
Oogah laggah
Oogah laggah
2, 4, 6
-African American girls & boys; ages 6-12 years from the Auburn Terrace after school program {East Liberty section of Pittsburgh}; 2001; Collected by Azizi Powell, 2001

Editor:
Here's how I saw this game being played:
More than three children stand in circle and begin to chant in unison. After the last line of the unison chant (i.e.“2, 4, 6”), one child quickly says “1”, and the child standing next to him or her in clockwise position says “2”, and so on, but skips the number "5" or any number with "5" in it {they say the next number and not that one}. For instance, after children say 1, 2, 3, 4, the next child must say 6. Any child says “5” or any number with “5” in it (such as “15” or “25”} is out of the game. Children who take too long to say the correct number} is also out of the game. Ideally, there is not supposed to be any breaks in children giving the next number. Children have to remember The last child in the game is "the winner". Because the counting could go on forever, players may want to decide ahead of time which number ends this game.

****
BANANA SPLIT (Version #2)
Banana Split makes me split
ookalocka ookalocka 246
not because ya dirty
not because ya clean
not because ya daddy got a dirty limosine
I betcha 5 dollars
I betcha 50 cent.
I betcha 5.50
U cant do this {clap up and down with a partner and then u hit your elbow wit yo hand and then at the end u do da same but u clap 2 times with your hands clap together}
-Alahna; 8/19/2006

****
BANG BANG CHOO CHOO TRAIN & BRICKWALL WATERFALL
For one example of Bang Bang Choo Choo Train, see Chili Chili Bang Bang on this page.

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts for numerous other examples of “Bang Bang Choo Choo Train”

****
BAZOOKA ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM (Version #1)
My mom gave me a penny
She said to buy a henny
But I didn't buy no henny
Instead, I bought BUBBLE GUM
BAZOOKA, ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM

My mom gave me a nickel
She said to buy a pickle
But I didn't buy no pickle
Instead, I bought BUBBLE GUM
BAZOOKA, ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM

My mom gave me a dime
She said to buy a lime
But I didn't buy no lime
Instead , I bought BUBBLE GUM
BAZOOKA, ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM

My mom gave me a quarter
She said to buy some water
But I didn't buy no water
Instead, I bought BUBBLE GUM
BAZOOKA, ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM

My mom gave me a dollar
She said to buy a collar
But I didn't buy no collar
Instead, I bought BUBBLE GUM
BAZOOKA, ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM

My mom gave me a five
She said to stay alive
But I didn't stay alive
Instead, I choked on BUBBLE GUM
BAZOOKA, ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM

i learned that one in elementary school... not sure how i remembered it! have fun... whoever needs this
-i know hand games! ; 12/22/2005; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php

Editor:
The official Bazooka Zooka Bubble Gum commercial and five other parody type Bazooka Zooka Bubble Gum commercials are posted on this page of Cocojams's sister website, jambalayah.com : http://www.jambalayah.com/node/157

****
BAZOOKA ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM (Version #2)
I was reading and i was amazed to not see a certain ryme...

My mom gave me a nickle she said to buy a pickle I did not buy a pickle instead i bought some bubblegum BAZOOKA ZOOKA bubble gum!
MY mom gave me a dime she said to buy a lime I did not buy a lime instead I bought some bubblegum BAZOOKA ZOOKA bubblegum.
MY mom gave me a quarter she said to buy some water I did not buy some water instead I bought some bubblegum BAZOOKA ZOOKA bubblegum.
MY mom gave me a five she said to stay alive I did not stay alive instead I choked on bubblegum! BAZOOKA ZOOKA bubblegum.
-Guest, BBG; 1/4/2007; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350 ; I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes

****
BAZOOKA ZOOKA BUBBLE GUM (Version #3)
this is one i learned along time ago:
my momma she gave me a dime
she told me buy a lime
but i aint buy no lime
i bought some bubble gum bazooka zooka bubble gum (repeat 2x)

my momma she gave me a nickel
she told me buy a pickle
but i aint buy no pickle
i bought some bubble gum bazooka zooka bubble gum (repeat 2x)

my momma she gave me a quarter
she told me buy some water (pronounced woarder)
but i aint buy no water
i bought some bubble gum bazooka zooka bubble gum (repeat 2x)

my momma she gave me a dollar
she told me buy a collar
but i aint buy no collar
i bought some bubble gum bazooka zooka bubble gum (repeat 2x)
-Nancy ; 5/14/2008

****
BILLY BOY
Two people sit facing each other. I'll do my best to describe the handclap motions... Cross down - start by crossing both hands over your chest, with your finger tips touching your shoulders, then uncross them and smack your thigh's. Your left hand will smack your left thigh and right hand, right thigh. The next step is to clap. When you clap, you begin singing the song. (For example: (cross down) (Clap), When Billy Boy was one..... (now begin claping with your partner - your right hand claps with their right hand - then you clap your hands together, next your left hand claps with your partner's left hand, then you clap your hands together. Repeat until the verse is over. When you start the next verse, begin again with cross down, slap your thighs, When Billy Boy was two...etc.

Verses: When Billy Boy was one, he learned to suck his thumb. Thumb Billy, Thumb Billy, half past one.

When Billy Boy was two, he learned to tie his shoe. Shoe Billy, Shoe Billy, half past two.

When Billy Boy was three, he learned to climb a tree. Tree Billy, Tree Billy, half past three.

When Billy Boy was four, he learned to close the door. Door Billy, Door Billy, half past four.

When Billy Boy was five, he learned to swim and dive. Dive Billy, Dive Billy, half past five.

When Billy Boy was six, he learned to pick up sticks. Sticks Billy, Sticks Billy, half past six.

When Billy Boy was seven, he learned to pray to heaven. Heaven Billy, Heaven Billy, half past seven.

When Billy Boy was eight, he learned to roller skate. Skate Billy, Skate Billy, half past eight.

When Billy Boy was nine, he learned to tell the time. Time Billy, Time Billy, half past nine.

When Billy Boy was ten, he learned to catch the hens. Hens Billy, Hens Billy, half past ten.

Cross down, then end!
-Jackie; 8/28/2007

Editor:
See "Poor Pinocchio" on this page for a similar handclap rhyme.

****
BIG MAC (Also Known As "Welcome To McDonalds" and other names).
Click http://cocojams.com/content/two-mcdonalds-handclap-rhymes-source-ads-pla... for a post that I wrote about this rhyme.

BIG MAC (Version #1)
Big Mac
Filet of Fish
Quarter pounder
French fries
Icy coke
Milk shakes,
Sundaes and apple pie.
You deserve a break today
At McDonalds!
And the dish ran away with the spoon
-T.M.P., remembrances from the 1980s (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

Editor:
This is a version of a McDonald's menu commercial that aired in the 1980s. The actual words to this ad were

"Big Mac/ filet of fish/ quarter pounder/ french fries, icy coke/ thick shakes/ sundaes/ and apple pie/ If you're hungry then for goodness sake / Give yourself a tasty break / With Big Mac, Filet-O-Fish, Quarter Pounder, French Fries / Icy Coke, Thick Shakes, Sundaes, Apple Pie / At McDonald's! "

Notice how my daughter and friends added a line from a nursery rhyme at the end. I asked my daughter why she thought that line was added, and she said "because it fit". So that's that.

****
WELCOME TO MCDONALDS (Version #2 of Big Mac)
Welcome to McDonalds
Can I take your order?
Hamburger
Candy fries
Chicken nuggets
Apple Pies.

[do a complicated (handclap) action sequence followed by these words]

I win you lose
Now you've got a big bruise.
-private electronic message to Azizi Powell from Uke (who learned it from his daugher); August 29, 2006

Editor:
Uke wrote that he got this rhyme from his daughter who attends an international school in Japan.

****
WELCOME TO MCDONALDS (Version #3 of "Big Mac")
Go!
Welcome to McDonalds
May I take your order?
Big Mac
Special snacks
French Fries
Apple Pies
Rock
Paper
Scissors
Shoot!
[Hmm, lets see]
I win
You lose
Now you got the tickle shoes.
-datura2323 ; Welcome To McDonalds http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=eMkpiLjKWU8 ; Jul 31, 2008

Here's that video:

Welcome To McDonald's game

Uploaded by datura2323 on Jul 31, 2008

Kids playin with their Mom! Very cute.

****
BIG MAC (Version #4)
the hand game.

big mac,
filet-o-fish,
quarter pounder,
french fries,
icey coke,
thick shakes,
sundaes and apple pie!
-Born&raised: maui_girl; 9/2008

****
MCDONALDS HAND GAME (Version #4 of Big Mac")
big mac, filet-o-fish, quarter pounder, french fry,
icy cold thick shake, sundaes and apple pie!
you deserve a break today, at mcdonalds
where the dish ran away with the spoon!

Ahhh...
:)
-Barbym1991, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLNpgWmx1PM

Here's that video:

Mcdonalds hand game

Uploaded by Barbym1991 on May 15, 2009

old hand game my mom and aunt taught us!! Enjoy!

****
WELCOME TO MCDONALDS (Version #5 of "Big Mac")
the way i learned it was...

welcom 2 mcdonalds
may i take ur order
big mac
jucy fries
milkshake
apple pie
(then we did rock paper scissors)
-MsGhettoChik; http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=eMkpiLjKWU8 Welcome To McDonalds Game; September 2011

****
WELCOME TO MCDONALDS (Version #6 of "Big Mac")
The one i know is welcome to mcdonalds
may i take your order
see my pinky
see my thumb
see my fist you better run
-sarahwentloco ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=eMkpiLjKWU8 Welcome To McDonalds Game; October 2011

****
WELCOME TO MCDONALDS (Version #7 of "Big Mac")
[mine's] a little bit different . it goes :
welcome to mcdonalds may i take ur order
criss cross applesause big mac salty fries
Dr.Pepper gotta let her eat eat ,
munch munch sip sip lunch , lunch .
ba ta bum bum bum . ( bang hip)

im lovi'n it!
-sofsilly12; http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=eMkpiLjKWU8 Welcome To McDonalds Game; October 2011

-snip-
Click http://cocojams.com/content/childrens-parodies-0 for examples of the parody "McDonalds Is Your Kind Of Place".

****
BIG MAC ,Version #8
Big maca tea tea (pronounced- tea yah tea yah)
quarter pounder
French fry
icy cold milkshake
Sunday its a apple pie....

This is what I grew up on in the 90s :)
-Heather H., March 16, 2014

****
BLONDIE AND DAGWOOD (Jump Rope Rhyme)
and does anyone remeber this:

blondie and dagwood went to town
blondie bought a dressing gown
dagwood bought the evening paper
and this is what it said
close your eyes and count to ten
if your out you'll hold an end
one two three (to ten doing pepper)
-Guest, guest; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=132 Child's Game: Elastics; November 18, 2008

Editor:
"Blondie" and "Dagwood" are comic strip characters. In that comic strip they are a married couple with children.

****
BLUE BELLS COCKLE SHELLS
Editor: Notice how "Bluebells, cockle shells/Eavie, Ivy, Over" is used as an introductory phrase for a number of different rhymes.

BLUE BELLS COCKLE SHELLS (Version #1) Jump Rope Rhyme/Skipping Rhyme
Blues Bells cockle shells
Blues Bells cockle shells
Eevey, ivy, over
-from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DrGijdmBqU&feature=related

Here's a vintage BBC television video clip that includes "Blue Bells Cocke Shells" and other examples of British children's street play:

Posted by BFIfilms
February 13, 2008

-snip-

This video is also posted on this Cocojams page
http://www.cocojams.com/content/showcase-videos

Also visit http://www.jambalayah.com/node/701 to view this same video and read selected viewer comments from its YouTube viewer comment thread.

****
BLUE BELLS TACO SHELLS (Version #2) Jump Rope Rhyme
(Start swinging rope back and forth without doing a full turn)

Blue Bells Taco Shells
eevy ivy ooover (now regular jump rope)
i went down town to see james (or charlie) brown
he gave me a nickle
to buy me a pickle
the pickle was sour
he gave me a flower
the flower was dead
and this is what he said,
he said: johnney jump on one foot one foot one foot,
johnney jump on two feet, two feet, two feet,
johnney jump on three feet, three feet, three feet,
johnney jump on four feet four feet four feet
johnney jump on FIVE FEET! (try to touch all hands and butt to the ground in one jump. everybody messed up here)
-Talia G.;12/5/2006

Editor: I love the folk etymology change of "cockle shell" to "taco shell". I'm sure that Talia is much more familiar with taco shells than cockle shells. Me too :o)
A related rhyme found on this page is "A Lady On One Foot".

****
BLUE BELLS COCKLE SHELLS (Version #3), Jump Rope Rhyme/Skipping Rhyme
Bluebells, cockle shells,
Eevie, ivy, over;
Mother went to market
To buy some meat;
Baby's in the cradle
Fast asleep.
The old clock on the mantel says
One o'clock, two o'clock..
(to twelve o'clock)
- http://www.homeschool.co.uk/resource/skipping-rope-jump-rope-hopscotch-s...
(assessed 5/23/2010)

****
BLUE BELLS COCKLE SHELLS (Version #5), Jump Rope Rhyme/Skipping Rhyme
Blue Bells Cockle Shells
Eevie Ivy
Over My Dogs name is Rover
He died last October January......(keep counting until the person reaches their birthmonth)
1..2..3...(keep counting until the person reaches their bithday)
- http://www.homeschool.co.uk/resource/skipping-rope-jump-rope-hopscotch-s...
(assessed 5/23/2010)

****
BLUEBELLS COCKLE SHELLS (Version #6) Jump Rope Rhyme/Skipping Rhyme
Bluebells, cockle shells,
Eevie, ivy, over;
Mother went to market
To buy some meat;
Baby's in the cradle
Fast asleep.
The old clock on the mantel says
One o'clock, two o'clock..
(to twelve o'clock)
Bluebells, cockle shells,
Eevie, ivy, over;
I like coffee, I like tea;
I like the boys, and the boys like me.
Tell your mother to hold her tongue;
She had a fellow when she was young.
Tell your father to do the same;
He had a girl and he changed her name.
- http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20101113222223AAw99M5 "What are your favorite jump rope rhymes,

****
BLUE BLUE (Jump rope; ball bouncing rhyme)
Blue Blue
Buckle my shoe* [bend down while jumping to act like you're tieing your shoe lace]
* or "Tie my shoe

Red red
Pee the bed.

Pink pink
Gee, you stink.

White white
Say good night. [fold your hands in a prayer motion while jumping; like you're saying your good night prayers]

Yellow yellow
Kiss a fellow.

Green green
Eat ice cream. [make motions like you are eating ice cream]

Brown brown
Get out of town. [jump out of the rope]

Black black
Don't come back.
- Azizi Powell, memory of my childhood, Atlantic City, New Jersey (1950s)

****
BO BO SKI WATTEN TOTTEN

Editor: Versions of this rhyme are posted together regardless of their title (usually the first line)

BO BO SKI WATTEN TOTTEN (Versions #1 & #2)
Bo-bo ski watten totten,
Ah-ah-ah, boom boom boom
Itty bitty wotten totten
Bo bo ski watten tatten
Bo bo ski wotten tatten-BOOM.

(A longer version)

Bo-bo ski watten totten,
Ah-ah, ah-ah boom boom boom
Itty bitty wotten totten
Bo bo ski watten tatten
Bo bo ski wotten tatten
Freeze please American cheese (stop clapping)
Please don't show your teeth to me
(Resume clapping and repeat verse with additions of different things to hide; lips, eyes (eyes shut)
-iluvmate; http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080418164413AAb904S

Editor:
My theory is that the words "Bo bo ski watten tatten" have their source in African American jazz scattin'. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scat_singing
"In vocal jazz, scat singing is vocal improvisation with wordless vocables, nonsense syllables or without words at all."

Of course, I could be wrong about scattin as the source of this phrase or similarly written and spoken phrases.

I was interested to receive an example of this "rhyme family" which includes a form of the "como la vista" phrase can be found on http://cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 under the name "oomalata feesta".

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BO BO SAY YOTTON COTTON (Version #3)
... few years later I learned a slightly different version [of Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky] rom some kids at day camp, also in San Francisco

Down by the banks of the hanky panky
Where the bullfrog jumps from bank to banky
With an eeps, ops, soda pop
Frog missed the lily and he went kerplop (freeze)

This was done to a 2-person handclap game which I can't really describe because it had some complicated motions. You did the same hand game, sometime right after or right before this other rhyme to the same motions. The lyrics to that one:

Bo bo, say yotton cotton
Nay nay, you are so rotten
Itty bitty cocoa puff
Bobo say yotton cotton BOOM (freeze)

Both of these rhymes had tunes that went with them.
- Katran; Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky; September 28, 2010

Edtior: A numberous examples of "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" can be found below on this page.

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BO BO SKI WATTEN TOTTEN (Version #4)
Bo-bo ski watten totten,
Ah-ah-ah, ski boom boom boom
Itty bitty wotten totten
Bo bo ski watten tatten
itty bitty wotten totten
Bo bo ski wotten tatten-BOOM BOOM BOOM.

Obviously we had some of the words wrong, but eh you know :)
-shortstuv21 (video commenter); http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2A0zYv5Z5Ak Granddaughter's Handclap; (2008), retrieved December 27, 2010

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BOBO SEEATIN TATAND (Version #5)
omg everyone does that at my school :P but we do it a lot different and the words are different ours kinda sounds like a different launguage ours goes

bobo seeat in tat and na na my name is bobo itty bitty rap tap bobo see ap tap bobo see ap tap pow
lol wierd right?
-MissAllyDancer (video commenter); http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPkw0NqKzRM&feature=related ; October 2010

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BOOM TICK TOCK (Version #1)
Another one I remember is entitled Boom tick tock and it is a hand clap only song. I cant describe the handclaps well by computer.
The sung words are:

Boom tick tock
Boom tick ee walley walley
Boom tick tock boom tick ee walley walley.
STOP!
I said a one more time!
(Repeat faster or slower)

I hope this was helpful.
-FloJaune G.; African American female (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, memories of 1990s; email to Azizi Powell, 2005

Editor:
My daughter remember the very same words of this hand clap rhyme from her childhood memories of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the mid 1980s.

It's interesting that the 2010 version of "Boom Tick Tock" (provided below) from a Black Pittsburgh girl has that cheer as a jump rope rhyme.

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BOOM TICK TOCK (Jump rope rhyme)
Boom tick tock
Look at that girl.
Boom tick tock
Look at that girl
In the mini skirt.
Yoiu mess with her
You get your feelings hurt.
She knows karate
From the front to the back
Jump ____* [Someone randomly calls out an action word; insert a girl's name]
She's all that. **
-Naijah S.; (African American female, 9 years old; Hazelwood section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; January 14, 2011; Collected by Azizi Powell

Editor: I collected this & several other rhymes from Naijah. She had accompanied her mother and her younger sister to a Zeta Phi Beta, Inc. Bedtime Story Hour program for which I was to tell an Aftican story and show some African musical instruments. Naijah came early (with her notebook size laptop-the first one I had ever seen and the first time I had seen a girl her age with any laptop). She very enthusiasticly agreed to share some handclap games and jump rope rhymes with me. Naijah said she learned rhymes from her friends and older cousins, and she teaches them to her younger cousins. Thanks Naijah!.

*Naijah said that someone calls out a random word and another girl's name. I gathered that Naijah meant that the rhyme is immediately repeated, and each time a new action word and the name or the nickname of another girl (the girl who is jumping in the middle at that time?). Unfortunately, I've not been able to contact Naijah to confirm this. Naijah gave the following suggestions of words that are said "criss cross"; "turn"; "bounce"; "spin".

** "__ all that" -a slang phrase meaning "very good"; "in possession of qualities that other people admire".

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BRICK WALL WATERFALL
Click http://cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts for multiple examples of "Brickwall Waterfall"

C
CATS DOGS IN OUT (Elastics Jumping)
Cats (straddle one elastic) in (both legs in)
Dogs (straddle the other elastic) out (both legs out)|In out in on
Out twist (jump, straddle the elastic and twist so that it gets twisted around your legs) out
In on in out (jump clear of the elastics to start/finish position), out (straddle both elastics) twist out (back to start/finish position)
-Guest; 2/14/2008; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=98 ; Child's Game: Elastics

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CEE CEE MY PLAYMATE
See Playmate on this page.

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CHARLIE CHAPLIN WENT TO FRANCE
Charlie Chaplin went to France
To teach the ladies how to dance.

First the heel, then the toe,
Then the splits, and around you go!

Salute to the Captain,
Bow to the Queen,
And turn your back on the submarine!
- http://www.fungameskidsplay.com/jump-rope-rhymes.htm ; retrieved on September 1, 2010

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CHILI CHILI BANG BANG
We used to do a chant where we all made a circle and somebody stood in the middle. The words in parenthesis are what the person in the middle would say:

Chili chili bang bang,
Let me see you do yo' thang,
(I cant!), Why not?,
(I just can't), Why not?,
(My back hurt, my bra too tight,
my hips shake to the left, to the right,
to the left and to the right! Hey!)

And the girl in the middle had to move her hips as she sang. It was sooooo funny then because we all thought we were FINE anyway! ROTFL!!
-MsAnn (African American female; Louisiana) http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=4123&page=3 Childhood chants and games......; December 30, 2000

Editor: Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts for numerous other examples of “Bang Bang Choo Choo Train.”

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CHING CHING CHINA
Ching Ching China
Sitting on a bench,
Tried to make a dollar
Out of 65 cents.
She did it, she did it
She did it like this...

(you had to jump w/ this one. first feet apart, then legs crossed, then feet apart again (on and on) and if you landed on "this" with your feet apart, you were a boy, and if your legs were crossed, you were a girl :o )
-Grace Kim, http://battery-d.livejournal.com/87113.html ; 12/17/2005

Editor:
This example is very similar to a rhyme called "Shimmy Shimmy China" that I saw performed in the 1990s in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and in some towns near Pittsburgh. See "Shimmy Shimmy China" on the second page of Cocojams Handclap Rhymes. Also, "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", "Choo Choo Charlie" and "Down Down Baby I Know Karate" are other examples from this family of playground rhymes. Several other examples of the "Ching Ching China" are found at http://battery-d.livejournal.com/87113.html in this section of rhymes.

There's no question that old songs [early 20th century if not before) songs that insulted Chinese people are one of the sources for the "Ching Ching China" ("Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", "Shimmy Shimmy China") rhymes. In the bad old days (which still occur today), the line probably was "Ching Chong Chinaman". Unfortunately, there are many offensive children's rhymes that include the words "Ching Chong". With the exception of this example, I don't include those rhymes on Cocojams pages.

That said, I believe that most children whom I've observed singing "Shimmy Shimmy China" don't associate the word "China" in this rhyme with the nation of China or with Chinese people. I think this in part because few African American children in Pittsburgh have any association with Asian people as that population only makes up a very small percentage of the population of that city. (However, there were about four Asian students in the school of about 200 children where I substitute taught & collected many of these rhyme examples). Furthermore & perhaps consequently, I believe that most of the Black children who I documented singing this song weren't aware of the horrendous American treatment of Chinese and other Asian people that is typified in the racist "ching chong Chinaman" cartoons & songs. And I think that' probably true for non-Asian American children throughout this nation, except perhaps in states like California where theree are larger numbers of Asian residents.

However, "China" and (even more so "Asia") are familiar multi-cultural contemporary names for African American females. In my opinion, besides its uniqueness, two of the reasons why the name "China" may be given to African American girls is that it meets African American aesthetic preferences for female names in that it has a beginning "Sh" sound and an ending "ah" sound. (I'm not sure why or how that aesthetic preference came about.). But I think that the Black girls who I've observed singing "Shimmy Shimmy China" think that "China" is a girl who is sitting on a fence..

It seems to me that adults should be cautious about reading their troubling issues with racism into the words of children's rhymes. BUT adults should also be aware that there are some racists content in some children's playground rhymes and those words (and actions such as "squinting your eyes") hurt regardless of their possible innocence intent.

Read the related rhymes "Choo Choo Charlie" and "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" below. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 to find the related hand clap rhyme "Shimmy Shimmy China". After that example I posted additional comments about Asian referents and the rhyme "Shimmy Shimmy China".

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/07/examples-of-anti-asian-reference... for a post about this family of rhymes.

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CHINESE CHECKERS
Chinese checkers.
I can do karate.
Chinese checkers.
I can call my mommy.
Chinese checkers.
ooh I’m sorry.
you better be sorry.
cause I’m not sorry.
itsy bitsy soda pop.
itsy bitsy ooh.
itsy bitsy soda pop.
A boy likes you.
-transcription of handclap game; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Svwim3MzAJ0&feature=related

Chinese Checkers and Lemonade (Beat it Once)

Posted by 44raytz
June 12, 2008

Editor:
"Chinese Checkers" is the name of an American board game that is played with different color marbles.

This handclap game was performed by three girls. See examples of "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" below. Also, click http://cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 for "Shimmy Shimmy China" for a rhyme that is very similar to "Chinese Checkers".

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CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (Version #1)
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
Sittin on a fence.
Tryin to make a dollar
out of 15 cents
She missed, she missed, she missed like this.
She missed, she missed, she missed like this.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
I can do ka-ra-te.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang!
I can hurt somebody.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang!
Oops! I’m sorry.
-Black boys & girls , around ages 6-10 years, (Duquesne, Pennsylvania), 1998, collected by Azizi Powell, 1998

Editor:
I've seen this rhyme performed as a partner handclap routine with some corresponding movements* or just sung with corresponding movements. The words "karate" and "sorry" are pronounced so that they rhyme (kah-RAH-tay" and "sor-ray").

On the words "Oops, I'm so sorry, each handclap partner pretends to slap or to punch the other one. The girls or boys lean back so that they won't be touched by the other person. While they sang the words "She missed she missed etc, the children did criss cross jumps. At the end of the rhyme if your feet weren't side by side, you were out. * Boys said "he" instead of "she". See "Ching Chong China" on this page and "Shimmy Shimmy China" for examples of very similar rhymes. (However, "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" may not have been performed the same way as these other two rhymes. Also, see my comments about the word "China" that I posted to the "Ching Ching China" example.

*I've seen children do imitative movements such as karate moves to this rhyme in videos, but not in my direct observation.

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CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG (Version #2)
this is one we did in school

chitty chitty bang bang
chitty chitty bang bang
im sitting on a fence trying to make a dollar
but all i can do is holler
she missed she missed she missed like this
she missed she missed she missed like this
chitty chitty bang bang i can do karate
chitty chitty bang bang i can hurt somebody
chitty chitty bang bang opps im sorry
-mariah; 2/26/2009
Editor:
* mariah spelled the word "chitty" with a "sh". I took the liberty to substitute the "s" letter with a "c" because I want to ensure that this website is available in educational facilities which might block access because of "bad" words.

The source of this rhyme is probably the "Ching Chong Chinaman" rhymes. I am concerned about how those rhymes were used and could still be used to demean Chinese and other Asian people. The change to "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" was probably influenced by the Disney movie about a talking car that has that name.

Read the related rhymes "Choo Choo Charlie" and "Ching Ching China" on this page. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 to find the related hand clap rhyme "Shimmy Shimmy China".

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CHOO CHOO CHARLIE
Choo Choo Charlie Sitting on a bench ...
Tryin to make a dollar outta 15 cents
he missed he missed he missed like this...

Its one of those clap games....did it when i was in 2nd or 3rd grade
-brittanie; Octoblog, December 4, 2005 [Unfortunately, it appears that the Octoblog thread on school yard games is no longer available.]

Editor: "Choo Choo Charlie" is part of the "Ching Chong Chinaman" family of playground rhymes. See my comments below the "Ching Ching China" example.

These words continue the practice of using alliterative "ch" words for the title & lines of these rhymes. The name "Choo Choo Charlie" may have come from 1950s "Good n' Plenty candy television commercials which featured the jingle about a little boy whose nickname wa "Choo Choo Charlie" who pretended he was a train engineer. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ExSlyoVTX3I for a clip of that jingle.

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLA (Version #1 ; Jump Rope Rhyme)
From my eleven-year-old daughter come these jump rope rhymes. She says they don't sing them, they are more of a chant than a song. They do this at school during recess.

Cinderella, dressed in yella, went upstairs to kiss a fella,
Made a mistake and kissed a snake, how many doctors would it take?
1, 2, 3, 4,...(count until jumper misses.)

Cinderella, dressed in blue, went outside to tie her shoe,
Goodness gracious, she'll be late. How many seconds did it take?
1, 2, 3, 4,...(count until jumper misses.)
-Jon W.; 3/10/98; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300 ;Cinderella Dressed In Yella

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLOW (Version #2 ; Jump Rope Rhyme)
cindreella dressed in yellow
went upstairs to kiss her fellow.
accidentlly kissed a snake
how many doctors did it take
1 2 3...
keep going until someone missed the jump rope.
-db, 3/8/2006

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CIN-DER-ELLA (Version #3 ; Jump Rope Rhyme)
a jump rope song we used to sing went like this:

cin-der-ell-a, cin-der-ell-a kissed a frog,
and lost her fell-a how many kissed did he get? (then you count how many jumps from there)
-Anna; 9/1/2007

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLOW (Version #4; Jump Rope Rhyme)
Cinderella dressed in yella,
wen' upstairs to kiss her fella,
she made a mistake,
and kissed her snake,
how many doctors did it take? 1234 . . . ect.

Most of the jump-rope rymes are rather morbid no?
-Tommaeee http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php; at April 1, 2007

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLOW (Version #5; Jump Rope Rhyme)
Cinderella, dressed in yella
Went downtown to get some musta'd
On the way her girdle busted
How many people were disgusted?
Red, hot, PEPPER!

...and the number of times you could jump fast ("pepper") was the number of people who were disgusted. lol
-eShirl; http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&add... Anybody remember jumprope rhymes?; July, 5, 2006

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLA (Version #6)
Cinderella, dressed in yella
went downtown to kiss her fella,
by mastake she kissed a snake,
How many cute boys did it take?
1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10........
-Guest, baby * shake; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=65824&messages=29 Aussie Childrens' School Song origin? ; January 31, 2008

Editor: No performance activity was given. Note: The title of the discussion thread does not necessarily mean that the poster is from Australia.

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLOW (Version #7 ; Jump Rope Rhyme)
Cinderella dressed in yellow
went upstairs to kiss a fella
on the way her girdle busted
how many people were disgusted?
1, 2, 3, etc.
- Various sources; posted by editor on February 20, 2011

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CINDERELLA DRESSED IN YELLOW (Version #8 & Version #9 ; Jump Rope Rhyme)
Cinderella dressed in yellow,
went downstairs to kiss her fellow.
Made a mistake,
kissed a snake.
How many doctors did it take? (count until the jumper misses)

Here's another:
Cinderella dressed in green,
died last night at 8:15.
How many cars, came to her funeral (count until the jumper misses)
- Afi S. (African American female, from memories of childhood in Nashville. Tennessee, between 1962 and 1965) ; February 21, 2011

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COCA COLA (Version #1)
Coca Cola, Coca Cola
Allley Alley pussy cat
Alle Alle pussy cat
Coca Cola, Coca Cola
Allley Alley pussy cat
Alley Alley pussy cat

The boys got the muscles,
The teacher can't count,
The girls got the sexy legs
So you better watch out.
The boys go tsh tsh *
The girls go Whoo!!
- weeneilly;(Wolverhampton, England) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nf8uQbAkJjc&feature=related; May 10, 2009

* The "tsh tsh" sound is given as "X X" in the transcription that is provided at
http://thevicarswife.wordpress.com/2009/05/11/playground-rhymes-1-coca-c...

Here's that video:

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PEPSI COLA (Version #2) of Coca Cola
We Do This At School But Our Words Are:

Pepsi-Cola
Pepsi-Cola
Alley Alley Pussycat
Alley Alley Pussycat
Pepsi-Cola
Pepsi-Cola
Alley Alley Pussycat
Alley Alley Pussycat
Boys Got The Muscles
Teacher Can’t Count
Girls Got The Trendy Looks
You Better Watch Out
Hypnotise Ya
Paralyse Ya
Turn Around And Faint

But With Different Actions :]]
-Chloe (Great Britain?); http://thevicarswife.wordpress.com/2009/05/11/playground-rhymes-1-coca-c... July 13, 2010

Editor:
Note that Jori, a commenter on that blog who described himself (or herself) as a Dutch musicology student who collects children's rhymes, posted this comment:

"Your version seems to be the most related one to that one I heard in Amsterdam. The first part is exactly the same untill ‘You better watch out’. And then they sing:

hit me baby, hit me baby
turn around and fall down

-snip-

Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers to find examples of "Pepsi Cola".

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COCA COLA PUSSYCAT (Version # 3)
We done that at our school except we done it like this

coca cola coco cola
aye aye pussycat aye
aye pussycat
coca cola coca cola
aye aye pussycat
aye aye pussycat
The boys got the big muscles
Teachers cant count
The girls go the sexy legs
you better watch out
I'm gonna hymtonitse ya
Paralize ya
Turn around and faint
*faint in partners arms*
-Lilbek2000production Jhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nf8uQbAkJjc&feature=related; Coca Cola Playground Rhyme ; July 2010

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COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN (Version #1)
Coca Cola (clap clap clap)
went to town (clap clap clap)
Hi-C (clap clap clap)
knocked him down (clap clap clap)
7up (clap clap clap)
picked him up (clap clap clap)
Dr. Pepper (clap clap clap)
gave him (clap clap clap)
sleeping pills (clap clap clap)
jelly rolls (clap clap clap)
Theres a place on Mars
where the ladies smoke cigars
every puff they take
is enough to kill a snake
when the snake is dead
you put diamonds in his head
when the diamonds break
it's enough to bake a cake
when the cake is done
it is 1991
when you tie your shoe
it is 1992
when you get stung by a bee
it is 1993
when you slam a door
it is 1994
when you dance the jive
it is 1995
when you pick up sticks
it is 1996
when you like a boy named devon
it is 1997
when you close the gate
it is 1998
when you're feelin' fine
it is 1999
then it gets all cold
then you
FREEZE!
- Miranda; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php at August 19, 2004

Editor:
This example includes the rhyme "There's A Place Called Mars". See other examples of "There's A Place Called Mars" and similar named rhymes on this page.

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COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN (Version #2)
I have a great song for you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!(To the tune of Stella-Ella-Olla!!)

coca cola went to town,
diet pepsi knocked em down,
doctor pepper fixed em,
now were drinking 7 up,
7 up got the flu,
now were drinking mountain dew,
mountain dew fell off the mountain
now were drinking from the fountain, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5!
-amia ; 6/15/2007

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COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN (Version #3)
another coca cola song...

coca cola went to town diet pepsi shot him down
dr. pepper fixed him up, now were drinking 7up
7up got the flu now were drinking mountain dew
mountain dew fell off a mountain now were drinking from a fountain
the fountain broke an now were back to drinking coke
-Guest, mathy, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034; Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky;
3/17/2007

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version # 4)
coca cola went to town
diet pepsi knocked him down
dr. pepper picked him up
now were drinking 7 up
7 up got the flu
now were drinking mountain dew
mountain dew fell off the mountain
now were drinking from the fountain
fountain broke, people choke
now were back to drinking coke
-h2osleepover | April 13, 2008
"a short versoin"

Here's that video:

pepsi cola

Editor:
It's interesting that the uploader of this sound file titled this rhyme "Pepsi Cola" but sung Coca Cola came to town". Incidentally, "Coca Cola Came To Town" is a parody of "Yankee Doodle Came To Town" which explains why some versions of this playground rhyme use that tune. The tune used in this video reminds me of a slower version of the military cadence "Sound Off".

Also note how children & teens are processing the realization that not only are there numerous ways of saying (or singing) the rhymes/rhymes that they've learned, but there also are no right or wrong versions. See the next two examples & comments below that refer to the above video.

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version # 5)
You don't know the song right: This song is ment for two people to say because at the end you JINKS them!

It's Coca cola went to town
Diet pepsi shot him down
Dr. pepper fixed him up
now were drinking 7 up
7 up got the flu
now were drinking Mountain Dew
Mountain Dew fell off the mountain
now were drinking out of the fountain
fountain broke, Now we're back to Coke
Coca cola hit the spot
now we are drinking out of the swamp JINKS!
-Skategurl12 (viewer comment); http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFYB_QCRRyY&feature=related ; 2008

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version # 6)
no thats not the way its supposed to be said and different people in different places learned it different ways i learned it as

pepsi cola wnet to town
coca cola shot him down
dr.pepper fixed him up
now we all drink 7 up
and so on so yeah its fun hearing different ways people learned it but u cat tell her that her way is wrong she just learned it different
-omgitsalize ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFYB_QCRRyY&feature=related ; 2008

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version #7)
Coca cola came to town
Diet Pepsi shot him down
Dr. Pepper picked him up
Now we all drink 7up
Bom Bom
Run around around around
Crash Beep Beep
Honk Honk
Run around around around
Crash Beep Beep
Oh Oh
Run around around around
Crash Beep Beep
Whoosh!
Crash Beep Beep
-adam, hope, lana (United Kingdom) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3xDuBQeqg8&feature=related; January 20, 2009 [transcription by Azizi Powell.4/16/2010. If I've made mistakes with the transcription, please let me know]

Here's that video:

posted by daniellegolding January 20, 2009

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version #8)
coco-cola went 2 town,
diet pepsi knocked him down,
dr.pepper fixed him up,
& now we're drinking 7-up,
7-up got the flew,
now we're drinking mountain dew,
mountain dew fell off a mountain,
now we're drinking from a fountain,
fountain broke, now we're drinking cherry coke,
cherry coke lost the cherry,
now we're drinking logan berry,
logan berry said " oh deer "
now we're drinking root beer, root beer...
what a joke, now we're back 2 plane old coke

thts wot we used to sing
-m3ganCbrnrd (viewer comment); http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Cw-Awwm_M&feature=related Coca Cola went to town rhyme (lyrics) ; October 2010

-snip-

Here's a video of "Coca Cola Came To Town" that is sung with a tune similar to the military cadence "Sound Off":

Coca cola came to town

Uploaded by indigocollins on Apr 16, 2011

me and indie singing coca cola came to town )

-snip-
"Coca Cola Went To Town" may also be sung in a call & response pattern with a tune that is similar to the military cadence "Sound Off". Unfortunately, the video example that I found for that way of singing this rhyme has been deleted.

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version #9)
So you have probably heard it different, but this is my version.

"orange soda walked into town,
purple soda knocked him down.
dr pepper fixed it up,
now we're drinking 7 up.
7 up has no caffine,
now we're driking gasoline.
gasoline gave us the flu,
now we're drinking mt. dew.
mt dew fell off the mountain
know we're drinking water fountain.
water fountain tastes like soap,
now we're drinking PLAIN OLD COKE"
-awesomegirlO (viewer comment); http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Cw-Awwm_M&feature=related Coca Cola went to town rhyme (lyrics) ; December 2010

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COCA COLA CAME TO TOWN (Version #10)
okay all you people gotz this wrong......... this is how it goes:

coca cola went to town
diet pepsi shot him down.
dr pepper picked 'em up
now were drinkin 7 up.
7 up got the flu
now were drinkin mountain dew.
moutain dew fell off the mountain.
now were drinkin from the fountain.
fountain broke had a stroke.
now were back to plain old coke.

EVERYONE ELSE IS WRONG!!!!
-TheTotalityForces; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6Cw-Awwm_M&feature=related Coca Cola went to town rhyme (lyrics) December 2010

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COCA COLA WENT TO TOWN (Version #11)
Coca cola went to [town]*
diet pepsi knocked him down
dr pepper picked him up
now I'm drinking seven up.
Seven up got the [flu]*
now I'm drinking mountain dew.
Mountain dew fell if a mountain
now im drinking from a fountain.
The fountain broke now
I'm drinking cherry coke.
Cherry coke lost it's cherry
[now]* I'm drinking loco berry.
Loco berry lost it's loco
now in drinking hot coco.
Hot coco lost it's hot
now I'm drinking from a pot.
Pot broke now I'm back to plain coke
Published on Mar 21, 2012 by Maddie12396

*The words in brackets are corrections of the uploader's transcription. "loco berry" is the flavor "loganberry"

-snip-

Here's that video:
Coca cola went to town

Published on Mar 21, 2012 by Maddie12396
-snip-
This version is a good example of what I call playground "trading rhymes". "Trading rhymes" are those where something is traded for something else because that first thing is somehow defective, This recitition of trading continues throughout the rhyme. A common example of playground trading rhymes are "Ooh Aah I Want A Piece Of Pie". Click http://cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 for examples of those rhymes.

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CONCENTRATION
Editor: This handclap game has various names including "Concentration", "Concentration 64"; "Hands Up To Eighty-Five", and others. I'm including examples of these rhymes here, regardless of their name. These examples are posted in chronological order with the earlest dates posted first.

For an entirely different children's rhyme called "Concentration (people are dying)" visit this Mudcat Cafe thread:
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915 Origins: Concentration (Kids Game)

ZING ZING ZING (Concentration handclap game, Version #1)
Zing-Zing-Zing
Zing-zing-zing, and away we go
To the Jackie Gleason studio.
Calaree! Calarah!
One apiece,
No repeats
Or hesitations
Or demonstrations!
Name some...

Foods: "Ham." "Turkey." "Eggs." "Cheeseburger." "Bacon," "Sausage." "Hot dog." "Watermelon." "What?" "Watermelon." "Toast."
"Hamburger." "I said hamburger." "No you didn't," ALL: "Yes she did. You out!"
Cars: "Mustang. ""Pinto." "What!? What you all naming? Oh." "Mustang II." "Firebird." "Mercury." "Cutlass Supreme." "Cadillac."
"Mustang." "Supreme II." "Cutlass S." "Um ...F'irebird." "You out!"
-Washington, D.C., schoolgirls, vocals.
"Old Mother Hippletoe: Rural and Urban Children's Songs" (Recorded in 1976 at the Smithsonian Institution Festival of American Folklife, Washington, D.C.; New World NW 29); http://www.newworldrecords.org/linernotes/80291.pdf ;

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CONCENTRATION 64 (Concentration handclap game, Version #2)
This is how I used to play it.

Two people stand facing each other with their hands out. Both their right hands are on the top and left is on the bottem. They move their hands up and down clapping 3 times in between. They are chanting

"Concentration.64.
No mistakes. Or hesitations.
I'll go first. and you go second.
The topic is --make up a topic--." Keep going on with the topic until someone messes up. The other person wins.

P.S. In the quotes, when you see a period(.) that is where you clap three times.
-Guest Ami; Origins: Concentration (kids' game)
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915; 5/9/2000

Here's a YouTube video of a version of this game played by two people :

Posted by sbgal8
July 14, 2007

"Alyssa and Terra trying to concentrate on the game"

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HANDS DOWN VANILLA FIVE (Concentration handclap game, Version #3)
How about this: remember this game that was played, usually with five or more people, and you have to name a certain number of things that was related to a particular subject? The chant went something like this:

Hands down vanilla five (Clap Clap)
Gonna get (Clap Clap)
One a-piece (Clap Clap)
To no a-piece (Clap Clap)
No Hesitation...(Clap Clap)
No Demonstration (Clap Clap)
Subject (Clap Clap)
Names of (Clap Clap) (enter subject name here)" Usually, the subject name was boys, or cars, or teachers....and after each round, the number of things you had to name went up....that used to be my FAVORITE GAME!! lol"
-PrettyPetite (African American woman; ATL, GA by way of Miami, FL;
; http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=4123&page=3; 12/29/2000

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HANDS UP TO EIGHTY-FIVE (Concentration handclap game, Version #4)
Ours went like this:

Hands up to eighty-five (clap, clap),
Gonna get (clap, clap),
Names of (clap, clap),_________(fill in the blank w/ names of boys, colors, food, whatever),
No hesitation (clap, clap),
No demonstration (clap, clap)
So let's go...."
-ZChi4Life (African American woman); http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=4123&page=3; 12/30/2000

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HANDS UP TO EIGHTY-FIVE (Concentration handclap game, Version #5)
Okay....our Hands up for 85 wnet like this:

Hands up for '85 (clap clap)
it's gonna be (clap clap)
a big surprise (clap clap)
no repeats or hesitation-concentration (clap clap)
naaames oooof _____________ (category) (clap clap)
starting with ___________(persons name).

It's interesting to see how the same hand game had different verses. I wonder if it depended on your region or your era
-Diamon,(African American woman; New Jersey; http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/showthread.php?t=4123&page=3;1/01/2001

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #6)
Just remembered another game I used to play called Concentration. It was a hand game. Everyone sat in a circle and set a rhythm by twice slapping their knees, then clapping twice and repeating that pattern. All words were accompanied by slaps, and claps would fill the silence between lines. The game began with everyone chanting

"Concentration. (clap clap)
Are you ready? (clap clap)
If so (clap clap),
let's go (clap clap).
Starting with (clap clap)
names of (clap clap) ________."

Fill in the blank. Birds, for example. The first person would say, for instance, "raven, raven". The next would say "raven raven, parrot parrot". Then "parrot parrot, sparrow sparrow", and so on until someone either forgets what the person prior said or can't think of another bird name. It was kind of fun.
-JennyD; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915; 10/31/2005

Editor:
Here's an old Sesame Street video of girls performing a Concentration handclap game whose words were changed to reflect the educational nature of that show:

Sesame Street - Three Girls clap a song about Vegetables

Posted by wattamack4
July 31, 2007

[Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 to read my transcription of this game]

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #7)
there's a rather popular competition handclap game called "Concentration" that I've seen performed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. Unlike most other handclap routines, elementary school boys don't have a problem playing "Concentration" -i.e. it's not considered a "girl's game.". But on second thought, I've seen "girls only" play this game but not "boys only"...so???

Here's how the game is played:

The girls {and boys}stand in a wide circle. Each child alternately claps the hands of the children standing on either side, and then claps her or his own hands. When clapping the hands of the children standing on either side, one palm is up and the other palm is down.

The hands are clapped on beat-of course.

While they are clapping the children chant in a sing song voice:
"Concentration
No repeats or hesitations
Name of ____ "

On "name of" someone [an older child, or a child who is a forceful, leader type] selects a category such as "Cars". "Girl's Names", "colors", "Fruits", "Sports"....

While reciting the first part of the rhyme {"Concentration, no repeat or hesitation, name of ___ ", one at a time, going around the circle in clock wise order from some starting point, each child has to quickly name something in the declared category-and like the rhyme says, there can be no repeats and no hesitations. If someone names something that doesn't belong to that category,or if she or he hesitates too long, or says something outside that category, or repeats something in that category that had been already been said, than, she or he is "Out".

Eventually there will be four childen doing handclaps {standing facing each other in two sets of "partners"}; then three children doing handclaps {standing in a triangle formation, and then two children standing facing each other doing partner style handclaps.

The object of the game is to be the last person remaining. That person is "The Winner".

I don't remember playing "Concentration" when I was a child. But this game must be played elsewhere as I have seen questions about it and examples of it posted elsewhere on the Internet..
-Azizi; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915; 10/31/2005

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CONCENTRATION 64 (Concentration handclap game, Version #8)
concentraction( clap clap) 64 (clap clap)
no repeats ( clap clap) or hesitation (clap clap)
i go first ( clap clap)
you go second ( clap clap)
the topic is ( clap clap)names :

and you keep clapping and example :
KEKE (clap clap) kiara ( clap clap) and every time someone say a name you go clap clap and go in order so know one won't miss a turn and they or you say what an another person says your or they is out and if someone stop or you stop your there out
-Guest345; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915, 4/28/2009

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CONCENTRATION 64 (Concentration handclap game, Version #9)
This is how I used to play it.

Two people stand facing each other with their hands out. Both their right hands are on the top and left is on the bottem. They move their hands up and down clapping 3 times in between. They are chanting

"Concentration.64.
No mistakes. Or hesitations.
I'll go first. and you go second.
The topic is --make up a topic--." Keep going on with the topic until someone messes up. The other person wins.

P.S. In the quotes, when you see a period(.) that is where you clap three times.
-GuestaAmi; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915, 5/09/2009

Here's a YouTube video that is similar to this example:

Concentration 64

Posted by tianshiangel
February 12, 2008

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NINETENDO 64 (Concentration handclap game, Version #10)
Nintendo 64,
no repeats or hesitations
starting with the name of... (anything usually colors, boys, girls, cars, toys, tv shows, movies, etc) they keep up the hand beat and shouting names to someone messes up whoever is left at the end is the winner.
-Guest KLC, (East Harlem, New York, New York, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 ; Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes? ; July 11, 2008

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #11)
Our Concentration game was a rhythm elimination game - great for b-day parties. Everyone sat in a circle, slap knees, clap hands, snap left hand, snap right hand while saying

"con-cen-tra-tion,
keep in rhy-thm,
cat-e-gor-y,
names of _____________" (boys, girls, foods, cars, etc.) Whoever broke rhythm or repeated was out, until one was left, who was the winner.
-Guest Nanny150; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915, 11/29/2009

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CONCENTRATION 64 (Concentration handclap game, Version #12)
In 3rd grade we used to play a hand game called 'Concentration'
If I remember it it went something like...

Concentration (clap clap)
64 (clap clap)
Do not open (clap clap)
the bathroom door (clap clap)
if you do (clap clap)
you will die (clap clap)
concentration (clap clap) 64.

Then we would usually start another hand game, but sometimes we would continue and it would go like...

no repeats (clap clap) or hesitation (clap clap) the topic is
-something-

You'd have to keep in beat (examples)

The topic is, names. Ophelia (clap clap) Alexander (clap clap)

Then you would pass it on to someone else and if you missed the beat you had to sit down (a stand-up circle)

Hehe.
Looking back this is kinda creepy!!
I had no idea what it meant when I was playing it, yikes!
- Guest; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915; Concentration game; 12/19/2009

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THIS IS CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #13)
Dude, I'm a kid. The game is
This is (clap, clap, clap)
Concentration(clap, clap, clap)
No Mistakes(clap, clap, clap)
Or hesitation(clap, clap, clap)
I'll go first(clap, clap, clap)
You go last(clap, clap, clap)
Category is(clap, clap, clap)
____(clap, clap, clap)

Ex. and first person to hesitate or repeat loses.
-Guest, Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915, 2/10/2010

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HANDS UP FOR ONE EIGHTY-FIVE (Concentration handclap game, Version #14)
I'm from Queens,NY. The game we used to play is as follows:

Hands up for one eighty-five (clap-clap)
It's gonna be (clap-clap)
A big surprise (clap-clap)
No repeats (clap-clap)
No hesitations (clap-clap)
No demonstrations (clap-clap)
Starting with (clap-clap)
Names... (clap-clap)
Of... (clap-clap)
(colors, girls, boys, etc...) (clap-clap)... repeat names until someone loses.

The first person to repeat, hesitate, or demonstrate any word lost the game.

Multiple people stood in a circle and clapped hands with kids to the right and left of them. If only 2 people, they faced each other.

I now play this game with my kids. They love it!
-Guest, Melissa; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915, 6/2/2010

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #15)
This is the concentration game I use to play when I was a kid...

1)One person chants concentration 64...no repeats or hesitations...i'll start by naming names

2)And then the person who was chanting names a name

3) Then this process continuing to alternate until someone hesitates or can"t name a name. A name can not be repeated.

NOTE: The beat that continues is like 2 double low fives (like in the game of slaps) and then 3 fast claps. This process continues until the end of the game.
-Guest, blank; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915, 6/24/2010

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #16)
Hey! We had a similar game in Britain. Or at least in our playground.

Con-cen-tra-tion
Concentration motivation
keep the rhy-thm
okay, let's play.

and everyone had a number or name or word, sometimes we used swear words.

and then doing the hand rhythm where you pat your legs, clap your hands, and then throw thumbs over your shoulders you say your number/word and then the word of the person you're sending it to.

I can't remember all of the rules, but I think you just weren't allowed to stumble over your words. It got faster as it went on. And eventually everyone was out except the two facing each other who just had to go faster and faster until someone stumbled.
-Guest,Brit; Concentration Children's Game; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915 ; October 19, 2010

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HANDS UP TO 85 (Concentration handclap game, Version #17)
Ok so I am 22 years old and it seems like there are different versions of "Concentration" we all know. My big sister taught me and my other sister this game. But I'm from Orlando, Fl and this the game we grew up playing:

Hands up to 85 (Clap Clap)
Gonna Get (Clap Clap)
Names of (Clap Clap)
(People) (Clap Clap)
No one-a-piece (Clap Clap)
No two-a-piece (Clap Clap)
No hesitation...(Clap Clap)
No Demonstration (Clap Clap)
So let's go (Clap Clap)
So let's go (Clap Clap)
Starting with (Clap Clap)
Leslie (Clap Clap)
Ending with Jamie
(Clap Clap)
So let's go (Clap Clap) So let's go (Clap Clap)

And then I would start and we'd keep going until someone repeated a name, hesitated, or messed up. HaHa. I'm 22 and still love this game!!. I just made my boyfriend play it with me yesterday! =) Usually, the subject was people's names or cars, or food, etc....and after each round, the number of things you had to name went up.
-Guest Leslie Lee; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915&messages=42 ; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); October 26, 2010

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #18)
This is so funny as I had not played in years and then on a drive this weekend I taught it as I remembered it to my friends kids and the chant is different than everybody's. We slab both hands on knees, then clap, then snap right fingers then snap left fingers to a rythemic beat and sing... Concentration, Elimination, starting with names of ... name subject like zoo animals.

You always say the words on the snaps. If you repeat or stumble you are out.

2nd version same chant you can repeat from the first word and then add yours to the end to see who can remember them all.

zebra, zebra bear, zebra bear elephant, zebra bear elephant kangeroo, etc.
-Guest, L. A;Concentration Children's Game; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915 ; !/11/2011

Here's a version of Concentration that is played with finger snaps (Sometimes the players appear to be speaking another language besides English)

concentration game

Uploaded by che3na23 on Mar 14, 2008

che3na,nana,ishy,mamaz,alyssa,jhay-r,&&jhonny!

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #19)
I used to play a game called concentration
all the girls played it
it was like this

concentration(clap clap clap)
64(clap clap clap)
no repeat(clap clap clap)
or hesitation(clap clap clap)
I'll go first(clap clap clap)
you go last(clap clap clap)
the category is(clap clap clap)
______________ (fill it in your self.)
you slapped each others hands while you were saying the words
and after the category name the person had to say something in that category without repeating what someone had already said or hesitating or they were out.
-Guest, just visiting ,Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915 ; 11/11/2011

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CONCENTRATION (Concentration handclap game, Version #20)
we used to play that too but we often did
repeats okay
and hesitation
because we were always repeating and hesitating and it was very frustrating.
Guest. blah; Origins: Concentration (kids' game); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=85915 ; 11/11/2011

**
Here's a video from Haiti that has the same hand clap beat of the Concentration game although I have no idea what the girls are saying:

Haitian Children playing in Santos Schoolyard

Uploaded by steveappleg8 on Jul 26, 2010

MVI 3758, recorded July 21 2010. Mission trip to Port au Prince Haiti, St. Andrew Baptist Church.

-snip-

I've also reposted this video on this new Cocojams page: http://cocojams.com/content/non-english-language-singing-games-handclap-... Non-English Singing Games & Handclap rhymes.

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COWBOY JOE (Jump Rope Rhyme)
Cowboy Joe from Mexico,
Hands up (as if someone were pointing a gun at you)
Stick them up (make guns out of your hands and point them straight ahead)
Don't forget to pick them up (pretend to pick up your guns from the ground)
Cowboy Joe, go blow! (escape)

Jump rope rhymes mid 1960s, Oxon Hill, Maryland.

By the way, "Blue bells, cockle shells, eevy, ivy, over" was the preface to most of our jump rope games.
-Ann N., 4/30/2007

Editor:
See "Blue Bells" on thIs page for another rhyme that included the "Blue Bell Cockle Shells etc" line.

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CROC DILLY OSO (and similarly spelled titles)
See "Quack Dilly Oso" on this page

D
DOGS DOGS
I have a rhyme i had made up and I wanted to share it with you, actually i have two rhymes that I wanted to share my friends did them and when i told them i made them up they didn't beleive me. So here they are City: Phoenix, AZ U.S. recited by a girl,me, 2007 1ST ONE
dogs dogs,
so harmless and sweet,
dogs dogs,
they just can't be beat,
dogs dogs,
so many everywhere,
dogs dogs, how many are there?
1,2,3, etc.
-sarah ; 3/10/2007

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DOUBLE DOUBLE THIS
Double double this this
Double double that that
Double this
Double that
Double this and that.
-African American girls, ages 7-10 years; Fort Pitt Elementary School (Pittsburgh, PA). collected by Azizi Powell, 2003

Editor:
I've seen this rhyme performed by two children standing facing each other, by four children (two sets of partners who take turns slapping the hands of the two people across from them), and by three children )(standing in a triangle formation).

I've also seen "Double Double This" performed by more than four children (standing in a circle formation).

Method of playing in a circle:
If the handclap rhyme is played with more than four children, one person is selected to starts the game. The children chant together. On the first word the starter lightly slaps the hand of the person to her or his right. On the next word, that person slaps the next person to his or her right and so on. The person whose hand is slapped on the last word of the rhyme is out. When only two people are left in the circle, they face each other and slap hands with each word. At this point, the two usually perform a standard handclap routine with the chant becoming faster and faster each time it is repeated. The person who messes up the routine is out, and the last person remaining is the winner.

Method of playing with a partner, with four children, or with three children:
This handclap routine can be done with two partners or with three children. A standard routine for pairs is:

Select a partner. Face partner. In the case of three children, there are no partners, but the handclapping routine alternates with each child.

Here's a standard handclap routine:
On “double double” use your upheld right hand to lightly slap the upheld left palm of partner.

On “This This” hold up both hands and lightly slap partners hands two times. On “Double this and that” hit partners’ two hands with your two hands.

Children may dip when they chant, and slap high, slap low, slap under their legs, and add hip shaking and body swaying movements. Sometimes children may also fancy up a handclap routine by combining body pats such as chest pats and pats to the soles of their feet. However, handclap routines are performed "in place". There is little if any movement away from the spot where the child is standing.

The most important part of the handclap rhyme is maintaining the correct sequence of hand clap exchanges. The chant helps children do this because you can remember which hand motion goes with which word.

Usually each time "Double Double This" is chanted, it goes faster. When this is played as a partner game with one or more sets of partners, those who perform the wrong motion, or don't perform fast enough are out. The person who is the last one remaining is the winner.

**
Here's a video of this handclap rhyme being played with fist doubled up alternating with the palm slap:

Double This, Double That

Uploaded by britnyank65 on Aug 19, 2008

American teens teaching a hand clap game to teens in the Dominican Republic

-snip-
Incidentally, this video documents one way children's rhymes are spread throughout the world - by people from one country who are visiting, working, or volunteering in another country teaching the rhyme to people in that country. Playground rhymes are a great way of learning English (or another language)!

**
Here's a video of three girls doing handclaps together while reciting "Double Double This":

Double Double Clapping Game

Posted by sharonmnich
October 04, 2009

**
Here's a video that begins with "ABC Hit It" but also includes the rhyme "Double Double This". Note that the two girls speed up the tempo of the chant and its accompanying fist motions with each rendition of the rhyme.

ABC Hit It by Samantha and Lauren

scacciata
October 28, 2008

"Samantha and Lauren demonstrate some hand clapping games".

**
Also, see the video posted with the entry for "Lemonade" for other examples of handclap routines that begin with the line "double double this".

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY

Editor: Numerous examples of "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" are found below, regardless of their titles.

DOWN BY THE BANKS WITH THE HANKITY PANKS (Version #1 of "Down By The Banks of the Hanky Panky")
Down by the banks
with the hankity panks
where the bull frog
jumped from
bank to bank
with an
eep
ip
oop
op
hes got on the lilly with a big
ker-plop!

::at ker-plop the players would try to a) freeze b) clap hands or c) hit each other on the head (depending on the version)
-contortme, http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php; 9/16/2003

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DOWN BY THE LAKE WITH THE HANKY PANKY (Version #2)
down by the lake with the hanky panky
where the bullfrogs jump from bank to bank
singing fee fi fo fum
ure momma looks like king kong
didley dong i went to school with nothing on
iu asked the teacher what to wear
polka dotted underwear
not too big not too small
just the size of dadeland mall (or w/e mallu choose
-no name given, Octoblog
“Schoolyard games”, 9/16/2003

DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #3)
I grew up in Pittsburgh (went to Liberty, Frick, and Schenley (High School) c/o 2000)

I know a circle hand clap game with chants called: Down by the bank. It is an elimination game because the children stand in a circle and try to eliminate (or not get eliminated) at the end of the song. The setup is that both of your hands are palms up. Your right hand is under the hand of the person next to you and your left hand is in the palm of the person next to you. When your right hand gets tapped you tap the hand in your left and return your hand to the resting position. To be eliminated if the last note of the song gets on you and you are to hit the hand of the other person and fail to do so before they pull their hand away you must leave. If the person whose hand is to be hit gets hit, they are eliminated. When only two people are left they alternate their wrists until the game is over and then arm wrestle to figure out the winner.

The words start:
Down by the bank with the hanky panky
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
Singing eep opp orp opp
- Flojaune G. (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), private email to Azizi
Powell, August 2004

snip-

Here's a video of two young men doing a handclap routine to a similar version of that rhyme:

erwunia
May 05, 2007
"Real men play clapping games"
.
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BULL FROGS (Down By The Banks of the Hanky Panky; Version #4)
down by the banks of the hanky panky where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky where the epps orps ops triple cycadelic cur-plops.
-Makina L.; Canada 10/18/2005

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DOWN BY THE RIVER NEAR THE HANKY PANKY (Version #5)
Down by the river near the hanky panky
Where the bull frogs jump from bang to bang
singing E I O U
Your momma stinks and so do you
So ping pong, ding dong
your daddy smells like King Kong
Under his feet and under his toes
your daddy wears pink panty hose
-Missy , 2/26/2006

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DOWN BY THE RIVER NEAR THE HANKY PANKY (Version #6)
Down by the river near the hankey pank where the bullfrogs jump from bank, to bank, and they say E I O U, your momma stinks and so do you so ping pong ding dong your daddy smells like king kong. Ask your teacher what she wears, polka dotted underwear. Not too big and not too small, just the size of city hall. Michael Jackson went to town, coca-cola brought him down. Coca-cola brought him up, now he's drinking 7up. 7up with no cafiene, now he's seein' belgain (pronounced beligene). Belgain is outta sight, now we're talking dynamite. 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, BAM!
-Veggie; www.cocojams.com ; 8/21/2006;

Editor:
This version combines the older handclap rhyme “Down By The Banks of The Hanky Panky” with a much newer handclap rhyme ““I Pledge Allegiance To The Flag”. The “I Pledge Allegiance To The Flag” portion of this rhyme documents the January 27, 1984 accident in which Michael Jackson's hair caught on fire while he was making a Pepsi Cola television commercial, singing a version of his hit song "Billie Jean".

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY Down (Version #7)
Here's how this rhyme is done by kids in Keene, NH these days:

Down by the banks
of the hanky-panky
where the bull frog
jumps from
bank to banky
with a
hip
hop
flip
flop
Missed that banky and went
ker-plop!

The kids sit or stand in a circle, palms up, arms extended to the side, left hand over neighbor's right palm. One child starts by slapping his/her left hand across to his/her right, passing the slap around the circle until "kerplop" when the child about to be slapped has to pull his/her hand out of the way, or else be eliminated. ...the children often try to slap pretty hard on the last syllable of "kerPLOP!"- of course, if the next child pulls back successfully, the slapper ends up slapping his/her self!
-Animaterra; click on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034&messages=13; "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky"; 8/22/2006

Editor: I started this Mudcat thread on August 21, 2006. As of 12/24/2010, there are 342 posts to that thread. Many of those posts are different examples of "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" from the USA and from other nations around the world.

Here's a video that has basically the same version of this rhyme. Notice the tugging motion that is sometimes used when the circle is done to two people.

Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky

starstar156 | May 13, 2010
"This was right after I lost...(oh darn it, I lost the game... :( :P ) & we were on a break at championships
oh & no one really knows who won...either Shanen or Stephanie...
& thanks to Kayla for singing for us ;D ":

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DOWN BY THE BANKS WIT DA HANKY PANK (Version #8)
Down by the bank wit da hanky pank where da bull frogs jump from bank 'bank say eeee ahhh eee haa haa skittle dittle kernal pop I pledge alligence to the flag Michel Jackson makes me gag Coca Cola has no taste Don't make me look at your face You run round you hit the ground i can hear the sound all the way back at the 'down by the bank wit da hank pank where dem bull frogs jump from bank to bank singing eee ahh haaa haa skittle dittle kernal POP!!
-Diana M.; 10/17/2006

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DOWN BY THE RHYTHM OF THE HANKY SPANKY (Version #9)
Down by rhythm of the hanky spanky do that do that hanky spanky fe fi fo fum listen to the beat of the drum micky mouse had a house donald duck messed it up who will pay the consequenses Y-o-u.

i learned this in private school blacks and whites sang it along with a different version of "Brick Wall Waterfall" and they sang it before 2003
-gaby,age 12; (usa); 11/15/2006

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DOWN BY THE RIVER (Version #10)
I usually like cheers but I like this Hand Clap. It's called Down By The River! It goes like this: Down By The River With The Hankey-Pankey Where The BullFrogs Jump From Bank To Bank They Say E-Pa E-Pa-Pa Skittel-Diddel-Kurnal-POP! Cherry-Cola Came To Town! Dr. Pepper Nocked Him Down! 7-Up Picked Him Up! Now We're Drinkin' 7-Up! 7-Up Got The Flu! Now We're Drinkin' Mountain Dew! Mountian Dew Fell Off The Mountian! Now We're Drinkin' From The Fountain. Oh-No The Fountian Broke! Now We're Drinkin' Plain-Old, Ice-Cold, Regular, Diet Coke! (By: **!!Enforcers Cheer Girl!!** Date Recited: ?-2007 Recited By: Me, My Friends, And A Lot Of Other People (Boys And Girls) Category: Hand Clap
-Cheer Girl; 2/2/2007

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #11)
down by the river by the hanky pank where the bull frog jumps from bank to bank sayin E I O U yo mama stinks and so do you so ping pong ding dong your daddy smells like king kong on your feet and on your toes your brother wears pink panty hoes coca cola stir it up now you've got 7-Up 7-Up has no caffeine so now you are caffeine free so 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10!
-chelsea ; 3/27/2007

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #12)
i learned this from chole,elizibeth1,elizibeth2,abby

Down by banks of hankey-panky were the bullfrogs jumps from bank to bank sayin' eeps iips ohp sacadillain - kerplunk!

1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 mickey mouse had a house dohnald duck messed it up who shall pay the caonceacuences mouse or duck (or duck or mouse)1 person said duck or mouse and if it ends up on you you pull your hand away so the other person is out then but if they hit your hand your out

-Guest; 6/21/2007; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034&messages=168 ; 6/21/2007; Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #13)
this is a game that me and my friends play down by the banks of the hanky pank where the bullfrogs jump from bank to bank singing eeps iips oops ummps chilly willy ding dong i plege alligence to the flag micheal jack makes me gag coca-cola burned it's butt now we're talkin 7-up 7-up has no caffeine now we're talkin billy jean billy jean is outta sight now we're talkin dynamite dynamite blows up the school now we're talkin really cool 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
-Allie ; 7/14/2007

Editor:
I'm sure that everybody else reading this knows that it isn't safe to play with dynamite. And of course I'm sure that you and everyone else reading this knows that blowing up the school or any other place without the proper authority and safeguards is a definite no no. See Cocojams Teacher Taunts page for other rhymes that also aren't meant to be taken literally.

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #14)
Down by the river with the hanky bankys
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
say an
epp
opp
epp
bop
bop
Skittle dittle curly pop
I pledge allegence to the flag
That Micheal jackson makes me gag
Diet Pepsi came to town
Coca-Cola pushed him down
Orange soda picked him up
Now I'm drinking 7 up
7up caught the flu
Now I'm drinking Moutain Dew
Moutain Dew fell off the moutain
Now I'm drinking from a fountian
Foutain Broke
Now I'm drinking plain old Coke
-Guest; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=940347/15/2007 ; Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky;7/15/2007

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #15)
down by the bank with the hanky panky where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky with the e i o u eastside westside ding dong see that house on top of that hill that's where me and my boyfriend live smell that chicken smell that rice come on yall let's shoot some...dice
-Guest; 12/15/2007; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=940347/15/2007; Origins: Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky

Editor:
Click on the Mudcat link provided above to read many other examples of "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" rhymes and while you are there, add your own version :o)

-snip-
Here's a link to a video of this rhyme from a children's orphanage in Ghana. West Africa http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2G34WUpAMyY [Sorry. The video itself isn't embedding. As the video's uploader is from the USA, it's likely that she or other volunteers from the USA taught this rhyme to these children.

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DOWN BY THE BANKS RIVER AND THE HANKY PANK (Version #16)
Down by the river and the hanky pank
Where the bullfrog jumps from bank to bank
Goin’ “Ee Ei Oh U
Your mama smells and so do you
Ping pong ding dong
Your daddy smells like king kong!”
Teacher teacher comb my hair,
Polka dotted underwear
Not too big Not too small
Just the size of city hall!

[I am white. This was taught to me by a Hispanic girl. This is a hand slap game].
-Liz; 9/24/2008

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #17)
Down by the river with the hanky bankys
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
With a hip hop soda pop
And the last one out is a bull frog *
-3kaylasue; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2CSWmfiNKM; July 28, 2009; transcribed by Azizi Powell

* I'm not sure if the words are "the first one out" or "the last one out".

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #18)
Down by the river with the hanky banky
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
With an oops ops
oops opps
Opps go tiddley [??]
and don't go stop [??]
-RacheyraE;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpiVE72Itgg&feature=related ; May 25, 2007; attempted transcription :o) Azizi Powell [The question marks in brackets mean that I'm not sure what the girls were saying.]

Down by the Bay

"That song with the hand jive... Jazmine vs. Kaitlin for the ultimate victory. Jazzy won".

Editor: Note that the title "Down By The Bay" that the video uploader gave for this rhyme is incorrect. "Down By The Bay" is an entirely different children's song.

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #19)
Down by the park you say hanky panky
say ooh la ooh la hanky panky
say fe fi fo fum
pass it to the sound of the
a e i o u bulldog
Mickey Mouse built a house
Donald Duck messed it up
Who will pay the consequences Y-O-U

And whoever got hit on the last “U” was out. It got violent!
-bee ; http://kateharding.net/2009/10/02/miss-lucy-had-friday-fluff/ Shapely Prose: October 2, 2009

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #20)
Mid-late nineties. Central New York

Down by the banks of the hanky panky
where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
with an ee ee ah ah oh oh um
down by the riverside, kerplunk! (you’re out it they hit you on kerplunk)
bippity; http://kateharding.net/2009/10/02/miss-lucy-had-friday-fluff/ Shapely Prose: November 4, 2009

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #21)
Down by the banks of the hanky panky
Where the bull frogs jumped to bank to bankies
with ah eeps opps I wanna piece of pie.
Piece of pie too sweet. I wanna piece of meat.
Piece of meat too rough. I wanna ride a bus.
Bus too full. I wanna ride a bull.
Bull too black. I want my money back.
Money back too green. I want a jelly bean.
Jelly bean not cooked. I wanna read a book.
Book too red. I wanna go to bed.
Bed not made. I want some lemonade.
Lemonade too sour. I got that funky power.
-hanzie99 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpVeoxwDGcY, October 2, 2010; (transcription by Azizi Powell from the video)

Here's that video:

hanzie99 | October 02, 2010
Down by the banks of the hanky panky, Tucson version,

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #22)
im from the Virgin Islands, St.Croix to be exact...our rhyme goes like this
down by the river hankey pankey
25$ dollars hankey pankey
he said, he said,
he said, he said ding dong
your mother smell like king kong
(count 1-10)
-Guest (Virgin Islands, St. Croix, Origins); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=94034&messages=333 ;Down by the Banks of the Hanky Panky; October 23, 2010

-snip-

Also, an example that begins with lines from "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" is located in the "Oah Ah I Wanna Piece Of Pie" section of this page.

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #23)
Down by the banks of the hanky panky
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
With a heeps, hops, soda pops
Hey Mr. Willy and he went kerplops
With a cherry on top
Here comes Noah walking in the dark (dark)
steps on a hammer and builds the ark (ark)
Here comes animals two by two
Hippopotamus kangaroo
Kaboom on you
Deep in the jungle where nobody knows
There's a big fat gorilla picking his nose
And he picks, picks, flicks, and it lands you!
Kaboom!
- Av5a and Rya2n; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43683MEh8j4 June 25, 2010 ; (posted on Cocojams on January 4, 2011)

[This video features the girls chanting several other rhymes.] As of 7/12/2013 I noticed that this video is no longer available.
-snip-
The line "Deep in the jungle where nobody knows" is usually given as "Deep in the jungle where nobody goes." The first lines of a very old African American narrative poem (also known as "toasts") called "The Signifying Monkey" are "Deep in the jungle where nobody goes/lives the signifyingest monkey the world ever knows". The rest of that toast is decidedly not for children as it contains a great deal of profanity and sexual references.

It's possible that that first line of The Signifying Monkey was a source for a children's camp song and a handclap game that also has that first line. See examples of "Deep In The Jungle Where Nobody Goes" on this page.

Also, click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/137 The Jubailaires -"Noah"
for a 1940 film clip of a quartet singing "Noah" which may have been a precusor for the Noah's ark section of this rhyme (and other such rhymes).

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #24)
Down by the banks of the hanky panky
Here comes ___ * with the great big stick.
Wonder what we go for arithmatic.
1+1=2
2+2=4
Now it's Spanish*
Spell cat C A T
Spell dog D O G
Now it's history.
George Washington never told a lie
Ran around the corner and he stole a cherry pie.
Now it's gym.
Hand's up.
Shake shake shake.
Hands down.
Shake shake shake.
All around.
Shake shake shake.
-Naijah S.; (African American female, 9 years old; Hazelwood section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; January 14, 2011; Collected by Azizi Powell 1/14/2011

Editor: I specifically asked Naijah did she know "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky". She said yes, and began to recite these words. Naijah said she learned this from her friend Malaysia. Incidentally, that same evening. I asked her mother, Sharron (African American), did she know "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky". Sharron said yes, but said she only knew the first line (which she sang/sung with the same tune as Naijah. Btw, this is not the tune used with the group elimination game, but a standard sing song tune used for a number of handclap, jump rope rhymes). The only line that Sharron could remember was "Down by the river hanky panky". Sharron said that this was in the late 1970s, or early 1980s, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (West Philly neighborhood) . She also said that she remembers it as a jump rope rhyme).

* say a girl's name

**Naijah said that this is supposed to be "for spelling" but that she and her friends say "Spanish" instead. Naijah said that this was a two person handclap game.

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DOWN BY THE BANKS OF THE HANKY PANKY (Version #25)
I have yet another version of "Down by the Banks" that I thought you might be interested in. It goes:

Down by the banks of the Hanky Panky
Where the bullfrogs jump from bank to banky
With an eeps, ips, ops, oops
And an oop-flop-a-dilly and an oop-flop-flop
Pepsi-cola ginger ale
Ginger ale, ginger ale, ginger ale, ginger ale
Pepsi-cola ginger ale
7-up, 7-up, 7-up, you're OUT

It is performed seated in a circle, with your right hand on top of the person's next to you and your left hand underneath. When the person on your right taps your hand, you reach over and tap the person's on the left. Whoever's hand is tapped on "OUT" is then eliminated and you repeat the rhyme until there are only two people.
For two people, the performance is slightly different. The two players grab right hands. When the rhyme starts, they take turns bending their arm, sort of like a piston. Whoever's arm is bent on "OUT" is eliminated and the remaining player wins.

Thank you for looking at this. I hope you post it so that all who are interested may see how I learned the game....

I learned "Down by the Banks" in Carmel, IN. It was in this past decade, 2000-2010. My elementary school was mostly white, so I learned this rhyme from my white friends. We were around 8 or 9.

Thank you once again.
-Celia G., June 16, 2013

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DOWN DOWN BABY

Editor:
"Down Down Baby" is a large family of rhymes which (like many other children's rhymes) is made up of a number of independent or semi-independent (stand alone) verses. "Down Down Baby" is also known as "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pop" or similarly rly sounding titles. For the purpose of this collection, I'm including examples of "Shimmy Shimmy CoCo Pa" in this section of "Down Down Baby" rhymes. I also am including a closely related rhyme that is titled "Checkoslovakia" in this section.

Lines from "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa" have been included in several R&B and Rap hit recordings, most notably Little Anthony and the Imperials' 1950's hit song "Shimmy Shimmy Ko-Ko Bop" and Nellie's 2000's hit hip-hop recording "Country Grammar" which is definitely not for children (though a lot of children chanted along with and danced to that record).

Also, many "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa"/"Down Down Baby" rhymes are very closely related to the "I Love Coffee I Love Tea" family of rhymes. Examples of "I Love Coffee I Love Tea" are found in the "I" section of this page.

Some "Down Down Baby"/"Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa" verses are also found in certain examples of "Last Night, The Night Before" and "Not Last Night But The Night Before" rhymes. In addition, some versions of "Apple On A Stick", "Take A Peach Take A Plum" and "Eeny Meenie Epsideenie" include lines from this rhyme.

Since at least the early 1980s, "Down Down Baby" rhymes appear to usually be performed as handclap games. Previously, "Down Down Baby" rhymes were chanted while jumping rope. Also, since around the late 1980s, some versions of "Down Down Baby" include confrontational language and a specific pattern of racial references. This pancocojams post focuses on that pattern: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/01/racialized-versions-of-i-like-co... Racialized Versions of "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" Rhymes.

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/12/sources-of-big-movie-rap-shimmy-... and the other two parts of that series for the meaning of certain lines from
"Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa" that are found in the movie Big..

And click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/11/the-real-meaning-of-spades-go-sp... for a post on the phrases "The Spades Go" and "the space goes".

Here are multiple examples of "Down Down Baby" rhymes:

DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #1)
Down, down baby
Down by the roller coaster
Sweet, sweet baby
I'll never let you go.
Shimmy shimmy coco pa
Shimmy shimmy pow!
Shimmy shimmy coco pa
Shimmy shimmy pow!
Grandma, Grandma sick in bed.
Called the doctor and the doctor said,
Let's get the rhythm of the head.
Ding dong.
Let's get the rhythm of the hands
Clap, clap.
Let's get the rhythm of the feet
Stomp, stomp.
Let;s get the rhythm of the
Hot dog.
Put it all together and what do you get?
Ding-dong, clap, clap. Stomp, stomp. Hot dog.
Say it all backwards and what do you get?
Hot dog. Stomp, stomp. Clap, clap. Ding dong!
-multiple sources, including the editor's (Azizi Powell)'s memory of childhood in Atlantic City, New Jersey in the 1950s. (This was a movement rhyme,and not a partner handclap rhyme) See Example #14 below of a "Down Down Baby" rhyme from Atlantic City in the 1970s.

Editor:
A version of the verse beginning with the line "Grandma, Grandma sick in bed" was collected by Thomas W. Talley, and included in his 1922 bookNegro Folk Rhymes, Wise & Other Wise.

**
A hip shaking winding movement is usually performed for the phrase "Hot dog". That movement and others are shown in this old Sesame Street video of a group of girls performing Down Down Baby:

Sesame Street: Handclapping Chants

SesameStreet | March 27, 2009
-snip-
Another video of "Down Down Baby" is found on this page under the entry for "Lemonade"

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SHIMMY SHIMMY COKE CA POP (Example #2 of "Down Down Baby")
The Blacks go down down baby
Down by the roller coaster
Sweet sweet baby
I don't wanna let you go

Shimmy shimmy shimmy shimmy
shimmy shimmy-pop!
Shimmy shimmy shimmy shimmy
shimmy shimmy coke-ca-pop!
-John Langstaff, Carol Langstaff, editor Shimmy Shimmy Coke-Ca-Pop!, A Collection of City Children's Street Games & Rhymes (Garden City, New York, Double Day & Co; p. 76; 1973)

Editor:
In my opinion, the phrase "The Blacks go" in the first line of this rhyme means "this is the way Black people say this rhyme". I also believe that "The spades go" and "the space go" that is used as introductory phrases in the movie Big;s version of "Down Down Baby" and used in other rhymes, are other ways of saying "The Blacks go", However, it's likely that the children chanting these rhymes aren't aware of the orginal meanings of any of these phrases. (See examples of "The Space goes, and The Spades go" in the rhyme "Two Lips" on this Cocojams page: http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2

Also, read my comments about the racialized meaning of "the spades go and the space goes in this post on Cocojams' sister website: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/12/sources-of-big-movie-rap-shimmy-...

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #3) Jump Rope Rhyme
[Editor: This initial comment is in response to a person's request for the words to a song he heard his children sing that he called "Downtown Baby".]

Rex, I hate to stir things up, but I wonder if the song in question is something your kids heard at school, maybe what they heard was what I'm remembering as a "jump rope song" instead of this 50's song Shimmy Shimmy Ko-Ko-Bop. What I remember from memory (we're talking LONG term memory here...) goes like:

Down, down baby
Down by the roller coaster
Sweet sweet baby
I'll never let you go
Shimmy shimmy ra
Shimmy shimmy ko ko bop
Shimmy shimmy ra
I met a girlfriend a triscuit
She said a triscuit a biscuit
Ice cream, soda pop,vanilla on the top
something, something
Walking down the street, 10 times a week
I said it, I meant it
I stole my momma's credit
I'm cool, I'm hot
something, something

Then again, this may be totally NOT what you're kids had in mind. The reason I think so is because you are calling it "Downtown Baby" and that is the first line to this jump rope song.
-rosebrook; "Downtown Baby"; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=6600; 9/21/1998

Editor:
Here's a video of two young children reciting a version of "Down Down Baby":

"down down baby"
Posted by bubblegumpunk72
May 16, 2006

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #4)
Down Down Baby
Down by the Roller Coaster
Ah Biscuit
Shimmy Shimmy Coco Pah
Ah Biscuit
Um Shar Shara
Uh she she ahwa
Ah Biscuit
I had ah boyfriend*
Ah Biscuit
He’s so fine **
Ah Biscuit
Like a cherry pie
AH Biscuit
Shimmy Shimmy Coco Pah
Um Shar Shara
Uh she she ahwa
I wanna tickle you.
-Diamond, Quala. Ashley, (African American females) ; Quinton, Javonte (African American males); Duquesne, Pennsylvania, 7/1999; Collected by Azizi Powell

*Boys said “girlfriend”
** Boys said “she”

Editor: This rhyme was performed as a three person, and two person handclap game. The word "pie" in the line "like a cherry pie" was probably originally "wine" since "wine" rhymes with "fine". The children probably changed the word to "pie" since they are more familiar with "cherry pie" than with "cherry wine". If my conjecture is correct, this is an example of children changing the words of a rhyme so that the rhyme makes more sense to them.

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #5)
Down, down baby
Down down the roller coaster
Boom Boom baby
I never let you go
Jimmy Jimmy Coco Puff
Listen to me now.
Down down the roller coaster
Listen to me now.
-Donald (9 years old African American male, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania); May 2000; collected by Azizi Powell

Editor:
Changing “Shimmy” to “Jimmy” is a delightful example of folk etymology. Donald also changed the phrase “cocoa pop” to “Coco Puffs”, the name of a commercially sold sweetened breakfast cereal. The command “Listen to me now” shows the influence of the 2000 hip-hop song "Country Grammar" by Nellie. That recording has very explicit (x rated) lyrics that includes this revised version of lines from the "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa"/"Down Down Baby" children's rhyme: "I'm goin down down baby/yo' street in a Range Rover/ Street sweeper baby...Shimmy shimmy cocoa what?/listen to it pound."

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Examples # 6 & #7)
The version I know goes:

Down, Down Baby
Down by the rollercoaster
Sweet, Sweet Baby
Please won't you hold me closer

(then some vague stuff about Ooo, Ahh)
-Kari

**
Well, "hold me closer" sure makes more sense.

The next lines (for the version I know) were:

Caught you with your boyfriend,
Naughty! Naughty!
Wouldn't do the dishes,
Lazy! Lazy!
Jumped out the window,
Crazy! Crazy!
-Kari (June 11, 2003) and Halifax (June 13, 2003); http://octopuses.chaoticinsanity.com/000518.ph "Schoolyard games"; [The Octoblog website is no longer accessible]

Editor:
I'm guessing that Kari's comment "then some vague stuff about Ooo, Ahh" refers to the verses "Ooh Ah I wanna piece of pie". Examples of those rhymes are found on this page under the title "Take A Peach (Piece) Take A Plum".

Since Halifax's comment refers to Kari's example, I'm reposting them together on this page. In 2003, I posted rhyme examples on the Octoblog website along with a request to reposts selected examples from that website on Cocojams. I was given blanket permission to repost examples from Octoblog by Halifax, one of that blog's members. According to a private email message that Halifax sent me, that small blog's members were university friends and the "Schoolyard games" section of that blog was the only section that accepted posts from non-members. From the comments that accompanied many of those examples, it appeared that quite a number of the rhyme examples were posted by pre-teens, and teenagers.

Unfortunately, the web address that I have for that website http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php no longer leads to that website and I can't locate the email for Halifax to identify the current email address, if one exist.

Notice the similarity between Halifax's example and the rhyme "ABC" (Version #1) that is found on this page.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #8)
Down Down Baby,
Down By the Rollercoaster,
Sweet sweet Baby,
I'll never let you go,
Shimmy Shimmy Coco Pop,
Shimmy Shimmy Rock,
I met a girlfriend,
A triscit,
She said a Triscit a Biscit,
I ce Cream,
Soda pop,
Vanilla on the top,
OOOH Johny,
Walkin down the street,
Ten Times a week,
I met it I said it
I stole my momma credit,
I'm cool,
I'm Hot,
Sock me in the stomach one more time...
I think that's how that goes, at least it does on the movie BIG....
-Ashley, Octoblog; August 10, 2003

Editor: The version of this rhyme that was recited in the movie "Big" is found on this page as Example #18.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #9)
Down, down baby
Down, down the roller coaster
Sweet, sweet baby
I'll never let you go
Chimey chimey cocoa pop
Chimey, chimey pow
Chimey, chimey cocoa pop
Chimey, chimey pop
I like coffee, I like tea
I like a colored boy and he likes me
So lets here the rhythm of the hands, (clap, clap) 2x
Let hear the rhythm of the feet (stomp, stomp) 2x
Let's hear the rhythm of the head (ding dong) 2x
Let's hear the rhythm of the hot dog
Let's hear the rhythm of the hot dog
Put em all together and what do you get
(Clap clap, stomp stomp), ding dong, hot Dog!
-Yasmin Hernadez; memories of a New York City Latino/ African American neighborhood in the 1980s; 3/2004

Editor:
Visit http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Articles_Essays/creole_art_african_a... for a 1987 example of "Down Down Baby" that includes the line "I like a colored boy".

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #10)
down down baby
down by the roller coaster|
sweet sweet baby
ill never let u go
shimmy shimmy cocoa puff
shimmy shimmy wow .
shimmy shimmy cocoa puff ..
here we go now -cassi; http://octopuses.chaoticinsanity.com/000518.ph School yard rhymes; Octoblog; May 6, 2004

Editor: The "here we go now" line is from the definitely not child friendly hip-hop record, Country Grammar" by Nelly. That record also includes lines from the "Down Down Baby" rhyme.

"Cassi" was a frequent, very creative poster on Octoblog. She described herself as a teenager living in the USA. Unfortunately, I don't know anything else about her, but I got the sense that she was White from some of her postings (particularly those examples of teacher taunts, as my experience has been that few African Americans, particularly African Americans in majority Black schools, recite teacher taunts). Unfortunately, that Octoblog website is no longer accessible.

Here's a video of another example of "I Like Coffee I Like Tea". This example comes from Australia:

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #11)
I asked my sons (ages 8 and 10) if the girls play "hand clap" games at their school. They don't!

Here's one I remember from the 1970s in NW Ohio that had hand motions. From looking online today, I think we combined a bunch into one long rhyme:
Down, down baby
Rocky-rocky roller coaster
Sweet-sweet baby
I don't wanna let you go (make arm motions like rocking a baby)
Shimmy shimmy cocoa-cola
Shimmy shimmy swirrrrrrl (make swirl motion with hand)
Shimmy shimmy cocoa-cola
Shimmy shimmy swirrrrrl
I like coffee
I like tea
I like a little boy
And he likes me
- W. Lomano, http://octopuses.chaoticinsanity.com/000518.ph School yard rhymes; Octoblog; November 10, 2004

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #12)
I remember
Down Down Baby Down Down the rollercoaster
Sweet Sweet Baby I'll never let you go
Shimmy shimmy cocoa puff shimmy shimmy I
Shimmy shimmy cocoa puff shimmy shimmy I
I like coffee I like tea
I like a colored boy and he likes me
so step back white boy
you don't cause a cool colored boy gonna bet your behind
He'll beat it once he'll beat it twice
He'll beat it beat it beat it
So let's get the rhythm of the head
Ding dong
Sho' got the rhythm of the head head
Ding dong
Let's get the rhythm of the hands
(Clap,Clap)
Sho' got the rhythm of the hands
(Clap,Clap)
Let's get the rhythm of the feet
(Stomp, Stomp)
Sho' got the rhythm of the feet
(Stomp, Stomp)
Let's get the rhythm of the Hot Dog (While doing the snake)
Sho' got the rhythm of the Hot Dog
Ding dong, clap,clap,stomp,stomp,Hot Dog
-Guest ,Pazzion; "I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes" http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350 ; 5/26/2005

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #13)
Down down baby
down down the roller coaster
sweet sweet baby
sweet sweet i love you so
Jimmy Jimmy coco puffs
Jimmy Jimmy pow
Jimmy Jimmy coco puffs
Jimmy Jimmy pow
take a peach
take a plum
take a stick of bubblegum
no peach
no plum
just a stick of bubblegum
I like coffee and i like tea
I like a colored boy and he likes me
So step back whiteboy you don't shine
I'll get my colored boy to beat ya behind
He beat ya high
he beat ya low
he beat you all the way to Mexico
-Aiakya; Octoblog; April 4, 2006

Editor:
Here's my take on that "you don't shine" phrase:

In this context, "shine" means to be someone special (to shine like the sun or stars. Saying "you don't shine" to a boy means that you don't think that he is anything special.(

A somewhat related use of "shine" is when a person says "I took a "shine" to him (meaning "I liked him").

It should be noted that the word "shine" in "Down Down Baby" children's rhymes doesn't have the same meaning as the word "Shine" in African American male urban "raps" or toasts. In those toasts "Shine" is the name of the anti-hero who is the central character in those oral narratives. The name "Shine" probably has its origin in the derogatory view that Black skin is thought to shine just like boot black [black shoe polish] makes shoes shine. Of course black skin doesn't really shine. However, that doesn't change the meaning of that name in African American toasts. In those toast the character Shine is a bad guy who is celebrated because of his exploits. Some of the most documented toasts about Shine feature him as a worker on the ill-fated ship named the Titantic. For more information about the character "Shine", read "The African American Toast Tradition"
by Mona Lisa Saloy. http://www.louisianafolklife.org/LT/Articles_Essays/creole_art_toast_tra...

Also read this comment in the Mudcat Discussion thread: "Folklore: Who's this 'Shine' guy?" http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97381#1916154 as well as my other comments in that thread.

*****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #14)
Down Down Baby, down by the roller coaster
Sweet Sweet Baby, my heart's in love
Ooh, che-chihuahua
Biscuit
I solemnly love her
Biscuit
She is so sweet
Biscuit
Like a cherry treat
Biscuit
Touche Turtle, pull down your girdle
Biscuit
-Ruth Archer (White femaie, Atlantic City, New Jersey); "Down Down Baby-Race in Kid's Rhymes"; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653 ; 4/10/2007

Editor: I started this Mudcat thread to provide an opportunity for posting examples of "Down Down Baby" rhymes that included racial references or did not include any racial references. I was surprised to learn that this Mudcat member was born & raised in my hometown of Atlantic City, New Jersey, though she is at least a decade younger than me. For the record, I don't recall this version of "Down Down Baby" from my childhood.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #15)
Hand Jives I've learned as a kid living in VA. Please Post some that you know!!!

Down down baby, down by the rollercoaster
Sweet sweet baby, mama never let you go
Shimmy shimmy coca pop, shimmy shimmy pow!

I like coffee, I like tea,
I like a color boy and he likes me
So step back white boy, you don't shine
I'll get the color boy to beat yo' behind

Let get the rhythm of the hands (clap, clap)
We've got the rhythm of the hands (clap, clap)

Let's get the rhythm of the feet (stomp,stomp)
We've got the rhythm of the feet (stomp, stomp

Lets get the rhythm of the head DING-DONG
(move head side to side)
We've got the rhythm of the head DING-DONG (move head side to side)

Let's get the rhythm of the HOT-DOG
(move body around)
We've got the of the HOT-DOG
(move body around)

Put all together and and what do you get....
clap, clap, stomp, stomp, ding-dong, hot-dog
Say them all backwards and what do you get....
hot-dog, ding-dong, stomp, stomp, clap, clap!
-Guest, Natasha W.; "Folklore: Play Ground Hand Jives" http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055; 5/30/2007

****
CHECKOSLOVAKIA (Example #16 of "Down Down Baby")
In Brooklyn, in the late 50s and very early 60s:

"Checkoslovakia" (A circle clapping game)
Checkoslovakia, boom, boom, boom
Now, Yugoslavia, boom, boom, boom.
Let's get the rhythm of the hands (clap clap)
We've got the rhythm of the hands (clap clap)
Let's get the rhythm of the feet (clap clap)
We've got the rhythm of the feet (clap clap)
Let's get the rhythm of the eyes (clap clap)
We've got the rhythm of the eyes (clap clap)
Let's get the rhythm of the number nine (clap clap)
We've got the rhythm of the number ... (clap clap)
(Then you count one at a time by fives starting with 5 until someone is out.)
-Guest, "Folklore: Play Ground Hand Jives" http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055; 7/27/2007

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #17)
For 'Down Down Baby' our ordering was different here in Atlanta
we did
Let's get the rhythm of the head ding dong... etc (the ding dong part came first)
"put it all to together what do ya get
ding dong (head side to side)
clap clap
stomp stomp
hooot dooog (move your body like a snake)"
and then did it all in reverse of course
"do it all backwards and what do you get
hooot doog
stomp stomp
clap clap
ding dong, other than that everything was the same (except we didn't say color, we said black, must be an era thing)
-Guest, CutieFromGA, "Folklore: Play Ground Hand Jives" http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055; 12/5/2008

Editor:
"CutiefromGA" (Georgia) was referring to an earlier posted example-reposted here as Example # 15. I believe she meant "Colored" when she wrote "we didn’t say color, we said black”.

"Colored" is a now retired reference for Black people (African Americans). This comment references another example that was posted on that thread. From the examples I've collected, it seems that these confrontational racial references date from the 1990s and are likely a reflection of the racial tensions that were (are still?) associated with school integration.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #18) The Big Movie version
The space goes down, down, baby, down, down the roller coasters
sweet, sweet baby, sweet, sweet, don't let me go
Shimmy shimmy cocoa pop, shimmy shimmy rock
Shimmy shimmy cocoa pop, shimmy shimmy rock
I met a girlfriend, a triscuit
She sad a triscuit, a biscuit
Ice cream, soda pop, vanilla on the top
Ooh, Shalita, walkin' down the street
Ten Times a week
I read it, I said it,
I stole my momma's credit,
I'm cool, I'm hot
Sock me in the stomach three more times
- transcription, Cocojams editor October 17, 2009 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p9z2hJwJuqg “Tom Hanks does the 'Big' rap - Friday Night with Jonathan Ross - BBC One; May 2009

Editor:
Most of the transcriptions of the "rap" from the 1988 movie "Big" give the "Oh Shalita, walkin down the street" line as "Oh, Shelly's out, walking down the street". However, it seems clear to me from listening to that particular interview that Tom Hanks is NOT saying "Shelly's out". Some people give the word "Shalita" (which I think is a female name) as "Shelita" or Shalida" or Shalitah". Any of these names fit what Hanks is saying better than "Shelly"s out".

I think that "Shelly's out" is given so frequently in this rhyme/rap because it's given so frequently. What I mean by this is that it seems that many people have copied what they found posted elsewhere without carefully checking to see if that was what was actually chanted in that movie. I believe that another reason why the phrase "Shelly's out" is given so often is that it appears to makes more sense and is more familiar to some people than the word "Shalita", "Shelita" or "Shalida". These words remind me of many contemporary African American female names. Those names may be modifications of the Arabic female name "Shahida".. In that interview, Tom Hanks mentions that he got this rhyme from his son, who, in turn, learned it in camp. Tom Hanks didn't mention this in that interview, but he may be aware that "Down Down Baby" is a children's rhyme from African American traditions. The fact that "Down Down Baby" is an African American rhyme may be reflected in the inclusion of a personal name from contemporary African-American practices.

bhackett777, one of the viewers of that video whose link is given above wrote this statement about the introductory phrase "the space goes: "i think its spades (black men) in the movie "Big". I think bhackett777 is right about this.

For more discussion of Down Down Baby (from the movie "Big") visit this Cocojams' page: http://www.cocojams.com/content/text-analysis-down-down-baby-movie-big

Also, see examples of "I like Coffee I Like Tea" (I Love Coffee I Love Tea") rhymes that are posted on this page. Those rhymes contain lines that are very similar to some lines in "Down Down Baby" rhymes. In addition, for other "floating verses" from "Down Down Baby" ("I like coffee, I like tea", see examples of ""Down Down Baby I Know Karate" and examples of "Eenie Meenie Justaleenie" that are posted below.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #19)
I went downtown to see Charlie Brown
He gave me a nickle to buy a pickle
The pickle was sour so he gave me a flower
The flower was dead so this is what he sai
Down Down Baby
Down Down The Roller Coaster
Sweet sweet baby sweet sweet I love you so
Shimmy Shimmy coco pop
Shimmy shimmy rah
Shimmy shimmy coco pop
shimmy shimmy rah
I had a boyfriend
a biscuit!
He's so cute...
a triscuit!
Apples on the table,
Peaches on the floor
Step out baby I dont love you anymore!
To the front
To the back
To the side side side
To the front
to the back
to the side side side
Abraham Lincoln sat on a bench
tried to make a dollor out of 50 cents
He missed
He missed
He missed like this !
-KaitlynReneeG; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdl8NVSJ_Jo&feature=related; 5/03/2009

Editor: The words to this version were included in the video summary. Unfortunately, they are difficult to decipher in the video. However the video gives a sense of the actions that some people do while reciting this rhyme.

Here's that video

"Blast from the Past"
-snip-
Examples of the beginning verses that are used for this rhyme are found below under the titles "Down Down Baby I Know Karate" and "I Went Downtown To Meet Charlie Brown". Additional examples of those verses are found in under the title "Shimmy Shimmy China".

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #20)
Down Down baby
Down by the roller coaster
Sweet sweet [charity?]
I love you.

Eenie meenie
[Pepsa deenie
Oh ah a lolly pop]?
I love you.

Apple on a stick
They makes me sick
They make my heart go 2-4-6
Girls girls have a lot of fun.
Here's come a boy with a big fat bum
[???]
[?? I bet he'll take me out ???]
Close your eyes and count to ten
You mess up you're a big fat hen.
1-2-345
6-7-8910
You didn't mess up
So that's the end.
-Lily Georgia Shinice Natasha; (t3delrowland-video uploader) [United Kingdom]; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sckxlhL4Abw&feature=related ; July 03, 2009 [retrieved on September 10, 2010]

Editor:
This is my attempt at transcribing this rhyme from the video. The brackets and question marks in the rhyme are posted where I was uncertain about what words were said.
This rhyme is a combination of two widely known handclap rhymes-"Down Down, Baby" and "Apple On A Stick".

Here's that video:

Clapping Song Lily Georgia Shinice Natasha

Editor:
"Forget That Boom" found on this page is another example of a handclap rhyme and video that was posted from the same video uploader.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #21)
down down baby
down by the rollorcoaster
sweet sweet baby i'll never let ya go
scooby doo scooby doo
scoobydoo WAH!!
scooby doo scooby doo
scooby doo WAH!!!

Thank for looking bye!!
-Guest, abi, Down Down Baby-Race in Children's Rhymes; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653 ; July 10, 2009

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #22)
down down baby down down the river side
pop pop
sweet sweet baby cherry on
top top
turn around touch the grond
pop pop hop hop x2
-Guest, meesha; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653&messages=20 ; Down Down Baby-Race in Children's Rhymes; August 29, 2009

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #23)
down down baby, down down the rollercoaster,
sweet sweet baby ill never let u go.
shimmi shimmi coco puff shimmi shimmi pow
shimmi shimmi coco puff shimmi shimmi break it down,
i like coffie i like tea i like a white boy and he likes me.
so step back girl cuz he is mine.
i bet u five $ i can beat ur behind
.. to the front to he back to the side side side.
to the front to the back to the side side side.
i can beat u with ur head ding dong(repet)
i can beat u with ur feet ((stomp stomp)) repet.
i cant beat u with ur hands ((clap clap)) reapet.
i can beat u with my hot stuff(hands on hips)reapet
now put it all together and c what u got.
ding dong, stomp stomp, clap clap, hot stuff.
now lets put it all backward and c what u got.
-http://hubpages.com/hub/Recess-is-BACK-Hand-Clapping-Games ; summmm13lzs; July 2010 (retrieved August 21, 2010)

Editor:
Note the line "I like a white boy and he likes me". I've usually seen this line given as "I like a black boy". I'm not surprised to see this "I like a White boy" version. If the "I like a Black boy" version came first-as I think it did since this rhyme is of African American origin, then it was only a matter of time that children of other races would substitute their race for "Black".

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #24)
… I learned a version of Down down baby that went like this:

Down down baby, down by the roller coasters
Sweet sweet baby, I'll never let you go
Shimmy shimmy coco pop
Shimmy shimmy rye
Shimmy shimmy coco pop
Don't make me cry
I like coffee, I like tea
I like the ??? boys, and they like me.

Now as I sang this to my daughter, I could not for the life of me remember what the adjective on "boys" was. Having read a bit about the rhyme on your site and on Mudcat, I am now pretty sure that the missing word was "colored". Now, I am white and the little girls who taught me the rhyme were mostly white, and this being the late 80s, in liberal Seattle, I don't think we had any idea what "colored" meant. My guess is that when I grew up and learned about the term and our country's history of racism, I mentally blocked out the "racist" term from my memory of the rhyme. Interesting.
-Emma M; (Greenlake Elementary School; Seattle Washington, late 1980s) ; May 10, 2010

Editor:
I exchanged several emails with Emma M. She confirmed that the version of this rhyme she remembers stopped after the last line given above. As part of my response to Emma's email, I wrote that the referent "Colored boy" isn't inherently racist. I also wrote that since "Colored" hasn't been used since the 1960s as a referent for African Americans, if any young African American (or if anyone else) used that phrase now, it's very likely that they don't know what it means. That goes double for the phrase "I like a color boy". Children who chant those lines may have been doing so from rote memory, vocalizing the rhythmic utterances without thinking about what the words they are saying really mean.

Emma responded to that email by writing "I agree with you that the term "colored" isn't inherently racist, but as soon as I learned about it, I certainly I would have perceived its use in the modern era by a bunch of little white girls as, at the very least, very embarrassing, if not outright racist."

end of quote

Emma also shared with me that she had talked with another (White) female friend of hers who went to another Seattle school at the same time as she did, and who also remembered saying the line "I like a colored boy" with the "Down Down Baby" rhyme. Emma also wrote that "the 1980s there was bussing and [Seattle] schools were fairly well integrated." end of quote

Here is an expansion and, partially a rethinking of additional comments that I shared with Emma M:

Unlike "the n word" and some other racial & group referents, the racial referent "Colored" isn't inherently racist or pejorative. As it is used in those "Down Down Baby rhymes, "Colored" (or "Black" or "White") are adjectives which describe a population of boys who are favored. Because those boys are favored or disfavored because of their race, then, yes, that line is (probably unconsciously) racist in the following way- the girls who chant this are reflecting the societal expectation that they favor boys who are the same race or ethnicity* as they are. *"Ethnicity" here meaning the United States definition of Latino/Hispanic.

-snip-

Those lines further emphasis the societal expectation that females should only be romantically interested in males from their own race. The girl who is approached by a boy from another racial/ethnic group, does more than tell that boy that she already has a boyfriend from her racial group. She ups the ante by putting him down ("you don't shine" can be interpreted into standard English as "you aren't anyone special". The girl also threatens the boy from another racial group, saying that she's going to get a boy from her race/ethnic group to fight him ("beat your behind"), presumably if that boy "bothers her" (approaches her with romantic intent) again.

I consider these "Down Down Baby" rhymes to be "racialized playground rhymes". Just as I don't think that every mention of race or ethnicity is racist, I don't think that every mention of race in children's playground rhymes is racist. It will be interesting to see how these rhymes evolve over time as they will probably provide clues to that particular society's views on interracial relationships.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #25)
The version I learned was:
This train goes down down baby,
down by the roller coaster,
swish swish baby,
I'll never let you go,
Shimmy shimmy coconut,
shimmy shimmy wow,
shimmy shimmy coconut,
shimmy shimmy break it down.
I met a boy mamacita,
he was so cute mamacita!
I met him, I fed him, My sister won't forget him,
he's mine, he's mine, so do the cherry line.
Pizza's on the table, pretzles on the floor,
back off, baby I don't want you no more.

If there's more, I don't remember it.
-XxmcrroxmysoxoffxX; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTFdsz8llOI Down Down Baby July 2010

Editor:
The lines that start with the words " I met a boy mamacita" are a folk procesed version of the lyrics of a 1990s R&B song by Troop called "Mamacita". A line from that song's chorus is "Mamacita/so glad to meet ya".

The "pizza's on the table, pretzles on the floor" line is a form of the verse " apples on the table/ peaches on the floor". And that line is from several often used endings to old folk songs and folktales. Here's a version of that verse from the now classic 1922 book Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise & Otherwise by Thomas W. Talley:
I has apples on de table
An' I has peaches on de shelf;
But I wish I had a husband-
I'se so tired stayin' to myself.

[from "Mama's Darling"; p. 188; Kennikat edition of Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise & Otherwise

-snip-
That line is probably even older than the early 1920s as it's likely to be a form of the song & story ending "bridle and saddle are on the shelf. If you want any more you must sing it yourself." That rhyme is sometimes used at the ending of the "Frog Went A' Courtin" folk song. Endings like are found in many Caribbean, and African American folk tales/folk songs and probably originated in West African storytelling customs.

-snip-

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 to find a handclap rhyme called "Mamasika".

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #26)
me and my friends do down down baby like this even when we are still 6 years old so it goes like this

down down baby
down down the rollacouster
sweet sweet baby
sweet sweet don't let me go
i have a boyfriend a BISQUIT
he so cute a BIQUIT
apples on the table petch in the frot
step on baby i don't love you any more
to the front to the back
to the side to the side
to the front to the back
to the side to the side and . . . FREEZE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
-TIFFINILE ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTFdsz8llOI ;July 2010

Editor: I reformatted this example into poety format]

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #27)
its

down down baby down down the rollercoaster
sweet sweet baby sweet sweet dont let me go
shimmy shimmy coco puffs shimmy shimmy raw
shimmy shimmy coco puffs shimmy shimmy raw
i had a boyfriend a biscut hes so cute a biscut
apples on the table peaches on the floor
step off baby i dont want u anymor
to the front to the bak 2 the side side side
kiki983159; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTFdsz8llOI Down Down Baby; 2010

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #28)
... we never did down down baby like that in elementary school. we always started off with charlie brown

charlie brown walking down the street,
he gave me a nickel
so i bought me a pickle,
the pickle was sour
so i bought me a flower,
the flower was dead so this is what i said,
i said "down down baby..." and so on...

also we never did the dingdong/hotdog thing with down down baby, but rest assured we did it! thank you so much for bringing that back into my life!
XxmcrroxmysoxoffxX; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTFdsz8llOI Down Down Baby; October 2010

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #29)
Down down baby down by the roller coaster
Sweet sweet baby, I'll never let you go
Shimmy shimmy coco puff
Shimmy shimmy rock
Shimmy shimmy coco puff
Shimmy shimmy rock

I like coffee I like tea
I like the black boy and he likes me
So step back white boy you aint shy
I bet ya five dollars I can beat yo behind
I said last night or the night before
I met ma boyfriend at the candy store
He bought me ice-cream
He bought me cake
He bought me home with a belly ache
I said momma momma Im so sick call the docter quick quick quick
I said docter docter shall I die
He said close your eyes and count to five
I said ah1,ah2,ah3,ah4,
I said Im alive on channel 5
Scooby Doo on channel 2
Frankinstien on channel 9
And a big fat lady on channel 80

All the rest on CBS

(Hope this helps!)
-jamaicamonkey; http://www.minti.com/questions-and-answers/discussion/419032/little-girl... ; August 2010

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #30)
down down baby down by the rollercoaster
sweet sweet baby, I'll never let you go
shimmy shimmy coco pop, shimmy shimmy rah!
shimmy shimmy coco pop, shimmy shimmy rah!
I like candy, I like tea, I like a little boy
and he likes me.
so step off jack, your hands are black
your looking like a monkey on a rail road track
To the front to the back to the side by side
To the front to the back to the side by side,
Ladies and gentlemen children too
this old lady's gonna boogie for you
she's gonna turn around
touch the ground
boogie boogie boogie till her pants fall down!!!

this version i remember from when i was little..i loved it!!

- Guest..jenna; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653&messages=18 ; Down Down Baby-Race in Children's Rhymes; October 1, 2010

Editor:
This is another example of a racialized version of "Down Down Baby"
I've seen the verse "step off jack/your hands are too black/you look like a monkey on a railroad track" in other rhymes. Also, see "get your black hands off of me" in Wooble Wooble Wooble" posted above in "I am a pretty Dutch girl" rhymes.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #31)
I always heard it as...

Down, down baby down down the rollercoaster
Sweet sweet baby, mama never let you go,
shimmy shimmy cocoa puff
shimmy shimmy pow
shimmy shimmy cocoa puff
shimmy shimmy wow
i like coffee, i like tea,
i like a white boy and he likes me
so stand back black boy you don't shine,
i got a white boy to kick your behind,
kick it rough, kick it tough, kick it till you get enough

I am VERY saddened that we said this in elementary school.
-Guest, Guest; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653&messages=22 ;
Down Down Baby-Race in Children's Rhymes ; December 12, 2010

Editor:
Guest, guest, with regard to your ending comment, I believe that children's playground rhymes often reflect the mores of the society in which children live, move, and have their being. Therefore, girls who recite rhymes with racial content are probably just echoing what they have absorbed from society in myriad (often unconscious) ways.

Unfortunately, it was (and to a large extent still is) the norm for children to believe that race/ethnicity (and gender) limits who they will be involved with romantically. And unfortunately, confrontational attitudes toward other races/ethnicities are all too frequently still the norm in the USA and elsewhere. In my opinion, the fact that you, and I (and I'm certain others) recognize this, regret it, and challenge this as a norm, is a hopeful sign.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #32)
I used to do a chant/clap game similar to that with my friends in elementary school when I lived in Indiana, it went something like this:

Down, down baby, down by the rollercoaster
Sweet, sweet baby, too sweet, I'll let you go
Shimmy Shimmy coco pop
Shimmy shimmy down
Shimmy Shimmy coco pop
Break down, break down
Two Chinese, sitting on a bench,
Tryin' to make a dollar outta 15 cents
You miss, you miss, you miss like this
This is how me and my boy friend kiss
Like this

Looking back on it now, years later, it seems racist, but I didn't really think about it when I lived in an area that was virtually just Caucasian, even though I, myself, am hispanic.
-Guest ,Alexis ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653&messages=24 ;
Lyr Add: Down Down Baby-Race in Children's Rhymes; Dec 22. 2010

Editor: See Ching Chong China", "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", and Shimmy Shimmy China on this page for my comments about the part of the above example that begins with the line "Two Chinese, sitting on a bench".

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #33)
I remember those rhymes. The Shimmy Shimmy Co-Co Pop (not pa) came from a song by Little Anthony and the Imperials. Now, he might have gotten it from a children's game, but we got it from his song. When I was a kid, it also reminded me of the cereal Cocoa Pops.

I remember the cheer, Aw Beep-Beep. I think that came from a song as well, although I can't remember which one.
Your version is interesting. Here's the one we did in Nashville, around 1962:

Down Down baby, down by the rollercoaster
Sweet, sweet baby, don't ever let me go
Shimmy, Shimmy Co-Co Pop, Shimmy Shimmy Pop
Shimmy, Shimmy Co-Co Pop, Shimmy Shimmy Pop

I don't ever remember racial language, but your version is newer than the one I'm sending.
- Afi S. (African American female, from memories of childhood in Nashville. Tennessee, between 1962 and 1965) ; February 21, 2011

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DOWN DOWN BABY (Example #34)
Hello, I actually grew up in Bloomfield, CT and I sometimes I sing the rhyming games I used to play in elementary school and middle school when I'm going about my day. I recently realized the words I was saying and I decided to look into if this was really a thing or just something in my town because most of my college friends have never heard it before. So I searched "down down baby down down the roller coaster" to see what came up and none of the versions came up, so then I searched "white boy white boy you don't shine I'll get a black boy to beat your behind" and I found your article. I'm not sure if you're still working on it however it intrigued me to see someone else from my small town had responded. I started school in 1999 and we had several handclap games such as old numbers, new numbers, down down baby, I don't wanna go to Mexico, and many others. Our version of down down baby went like this:

"Down down baby
Down down the roller coaster
Sweet sweet baby I'll never let you go
Shimmy shimmy cocoa boy
Shimmy white (where white is pronounced more like a loose why)
Shimmy shimmy cocoa boy
Shimmy shimmy white
White boy white boy you don't shine
And I'll get a black boy to beat your behind"
Sometimes we would continue it with
"Wait come back
You need a tic tac
Not a tic not a tac
But the whole darn pack
Matter of fact
You need some listerine
not a sip not a swallow
But the whole dang bottle"
I never even looked at is as racism as a child it was just a game to all of us.
-A Quinn, December 20, 2014

****
DOWN DOWN BABY, I KNOW KARATE (Version #1)
Down, down baby,
I know karate.
Down, down baby,
I can shake my body.
Down, down baby,
I can call my mommy.
Oops! I’m so sorry *
Down, down baby,
to the front,
to the back,
to the side, side, side **
Watch me do the butterfly ***
-Teneisha (female, 11 years) and Antoinette (female, 10 years); Pittsburgh, PA., 1999

* both girls simultaneously “accidentally” tap each other player on the forehead
** to the beat, both girls jump to the front, then to the back, then to the right, then to the left, and back to the right
*** both girls do “the butterfly”, a hip wiggling Reggae/R&B dance that was popular around 1994.

Editor:
"Down Down Baby I Know Karate" is a variant form of the widely known rhyme "Down Down Baby" which is also widely known as "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa".

I've posted a number of comments below about the probably unconscious racial implications of this rhyme. I want to focus on the line " tryin to make a dollar out of a 15 cents" (or some lesser amount of money, an amount that has increased over time from 15 cents to upwards of 75 cents).

This line is prefaced by the line about two Chinese men sitting on the fence (or in most contemporary versions, "the bench"). Given that playground rhymes & old songs about Chinese were almost always uncomplimentary, I sense that that "tryin to make a dollar out of 15 cents" doesn't refer to those men being resourceful in how they stretch what little money they have.

One meaning for this verse was given by the blogger Sinsull in this discussion about American rhymes & songs that referenced Chinese people:

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=89534
"RE: Origins: Chink a Boo Man
From:SINSULL
Date: 10 Mar 06 - 01:04 PM
I haven't heard the term "Chink" in 40 years. And would not hear it without speaking up. In my childhood we recited:

Ching Ching Chinamen
Sittin' on a fence
Trying to make a dollar out fifteen cents.

Nasty little bit of racist ridicule of a foreigner trying to make sense of our money and appearing to be a cheat in the process. "...

"Being a cheat in the process" carries with it the implication that men were scheming, gambling, or otherwise engaged in some illegal or at least not middle class activity to make more money out of what they have.

The "sitting in the bench (or sitting on the fence) line may imply that the men were just lazing their time instead of engaging in legitimate work like "regular Americans" do.

Note that this "Tryin to make a dollar out of fifteen cents" line is also found in the Hip-Hop song "Keep Ya Head Up" by Tupac. http://rapgenius.com/2pac-keep-ya-head-up-lyrics#note-30059 indicates that that is "A popular phrase in rap music for get-rich schemes (even used as the title of a Master P song*), usually illegal, and almost always referring to selling crack cocaine." -snip- However, in the video of this song http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfXwmDGJAB8 [at 2:19], the scene is of a mother trying to figure out which bills to pay with the little money she has ("stretching" her money.]

So, that verse in the rhyme could mean something complimentary. But I'm not convinced that it originally was in any way complimentary.

*The above referenced Master P song is definitely about selling dime & nickel bags [of weed] or otherwise selling dope. That song contains profanity & references which, in my opinion, are definitely not for children's reading or viewing.

****
DOWN DOWN BABY I CAN DO KARATE (Version #2)
I have one, my cousin told me and she is only 7...

down down baby i can do karate
down down baby i can call my boyfriend
down down baby oops i did it again

my hands up high
my feet down low
thats the way i gigilo
-posted by K; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php ;June 25, 2005

Editor:
Unfortunately, that blog appears to no longer be active. Click to find other examples of "Gigalo" http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0

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DOWN DOWN BABY, I KNOW KARATE (Version #3)
A two-person game!

Down down baby
I can do karate (do some judo chops here)
Down down baby
I can shake my body (wiggle around)
Down down baby
I can phone my mommy (pretend you're phoning someone)
Down down baby
Oops! (smack the other person LIGHTLY on the forehead)
I'm sorry!
-Charlotte; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php ; February 4, 2007

****
ELMO'S VERSION OF DOWN DOWN BABY l CAN DO KARATE (Version #4)
Down down Baby
Elmo do karate
Down down baby
Elmo call his mommy
Down down baby
Elmo shake his body
Down Down Baby
Elmo eat salomi
Down Down Baby
Oops! Elmo sorry.
outspokenone1; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44qLwfFEJ7w&feature=related September 01, 2007 (transcription from the video)

Here's that video of a little girl moving to this song while it is sung on Sesame Street:

outspokenone1 | September 01, 2007
-snip-
Read other versions of this rhyme below under the title "I Went Downtown To Meet Charlie Brown".

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DOWN IN THE VALLEY THE GREEN GRASS GROW (Example #1) Jump Rope Rhyme
Down in the valley where the green grass grows
There sat [girl's name] as sweet as a rose
She sang she sang she sang so sweet
Along came [boy's name] who kissed her on the cheek.
How many kisses did she get?
Ah 1, Ah 2, Ah 3 {keep counting until you miss}
-Azizi; memories of childhood, 1950s; Atlantic City, New Jersey

Editor:
This jump rope rhyme can be sung while jumping rope by yourself or while jumping rope with other kids. As I remember jumping rope with a group of other kids, the jumper didn't sing, but concentrated on jumping. The people who sang were the "enders" who turned the rope, and-sometimes-other kids waiting for their turn as jumper{s}. Once in a while, boys also jumped rope with the girls. If the person jumping was a boy, the gender was changed to "he sang he sang he sang so sweet & along came {girl's name} & kissed him on the cheek" etc.

****
DOWN IN THE VALLEY WHERE THE GREEN GRASS GROWS (Example #2) Jump Rope Rhyme
Down in the valley where the green grass grows along came (a name) as sweet as a rose he sang, he sang, he sang so sweet, how many kisses did he get on his cheek? (start counting until they get out with the jump-rope or you could step to it)
-Daelon, age 8; & Shacora, age 11; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania}; 3/21/2006

*****
DOWN IN THE MEADOW WHERE THE GREEN GRASS GROWS (Example #3) Jump Rope Rhyme
Down in the meadow where the green grass grows, there sat (name of person jumping) as sweet as a rose. She/He sang he/she sang she/he sang so sweet and along came (other person of opposite sex) and kissed her/him on the cheek. How many kisses did he/she get that week. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, .............. keep going until they mess up on jumping
-miley ; 11/21/2007

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DOWN IN THE VALLEY WHERE THE GREEN GRASS GROWS (Example #4) Jump Rope Rhyme

Here's my transcription of a version of this rhyme that is featured on a YouTube video.. The (?) means I'm unsure about that word or line. The word in brackets means that I think that word isn't said but is understood..

1st verse:
Down in the valley where the green grass grows
There's a lady green (?)
She grows {?) like a rose.
She grows (?), she grows, she grows so sweet
That she calls for a ladder (?)
At the end of the street.

2nd verse
Sweetheart, sweetheart
Will you marry me?
Yes, love, yes love
[at] Haft past three.
3nd verse Ice cake
spice cake
soft parfait (?) [pronounced "partee"]
And we'll have a wedding
At half past three

4rd verse
Pomp Pomp
Here comes the taxicab
Pomp Pomp
Here comes the taxicab
Pomp Pomp
Here comes the taxicab
[We're] ready for the wedding at half-past three
- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3KDVbKU7is
The Singing Street: children playing in Edinburgh (1950s)

(Sorry, embedding this video isn't permitted)

Editor:
I was surprised to see girls in 1950s Scotland playing Double Dutch. Note that the style of jumping Double Dutch is quite different than the acrobatic, dance style that African American girls were (are?) known to do for fun. The jumping style shown in the video is also different than the style used in competitive Double Dutch competitiions.

Btw, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_Dutch_(jump_rope) indicates that "Double Dutch began in the inner cities of America" Inner city" as used in that sentence is a euphemism for "Black communities" But that article also notes that "It is debated whether Double Dutch came over with the first Dutch settlers or appeared in the first half of the 1900s" . Where and when did the street game Double Dutch (as opposed to the compettitive sport Double Dutch) originate?

****
DOWN IN MISSISSIPPI
[This is] A jump rope rhyme I remember that probably has an African American origin: Down in Mississippi where the boats go "pushy-whooshy" (Two girls would jump together, and one would pretend to push the other out at the end of the "rhyme." I'm 60 years old and learned these on the playground in Waterbury Connecticut in the early 50s.
-Ellen R.; 11/9/2007

Editor:
Thanks, Ellen R., for sending in that example. I've never "heard" that rhyme before. Thanks, also for sending in an example of "Little Sally Waters" which I posted on Cocojams' Games Children Play page. I also appreciate the fact that you included demographical information {your age, and when & where you remembered learning these rhymes}. Keeping a record of demographical information helps researchers track & study the continuity & changes that may occur in rhymes over time and space. Also, Ellen R., thanks for including your opinion about the African American origin of this rhyme. Since I've never heard or read this rhyme before, I have no opinion, and haven't seen any documentation that can support or disprove your opinion about the origin of this rhyme. If any Cocojams readers know this rhyme or know one like it, please send in those examples and remember to include demographical information & other comments. Thanks!

****
DOWN IN THE JUNGLE
Examples of this rhyme are posted together regardless of their title.

DEEP IN THE JUNGLE WHERE NOBODY GOES

Editor: This children's action song and its handclap game version is not the very old African American toast (narrative poem) "The Signifying Monkey" which starts with that same line. The Signifying Monkey is decidedly not for children as it contains a great deal of profanity and sexual references. It's possible that the first line of the children's song/rhyme was lifted from that adult toast, but there may be no way to verify that.

The camp song "Deep In The Jungle Where Nobody Goes" is also called "Deep In The Valley Where Nobody Goes", "The Washer Woman"; "The Washy Washy Washerwoman" , "The Boogie-Woogie Washing Woman" and simiar titles.

The children's version of "Down In The Jungle Where Nobody Knows" (and not the adult toast) probably started as a camp action song or a camp song that was sung as a "round". However, I've found some examples of the handclap game version of this song that are very much like performance activity that is most often associated with "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky". Indeed, "Down In The Jungle" has the same tune as "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky". And some versions of "Deep In The Jungle" include a verse of "hanky panky" and vice versa. See "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" version #21 below for an example of this.

****
DOWN IN THE JUNGLE WHERE NOBODY GOES (Version #2)
Brownies were sitting cross legged in a circle so their knees were touching, with their hands on their knees. The palm of their left hands were facing upwards, the palm of their left hands resting on top of the hand of the Brownie next to her.

The leader (who should know better frankly!) asks the first girl to hold up her hand and pretends to slosh into her hand a huge dollop of lovely, green, slimey gorilla snot. As the song begins, each brownie passes on the 'snot' from her hand to the Brownie next to her, and so on. This is accompanied by much urggghhhh-ing, squealing and laughter, with big, sweeping movements of hands through the air:-

"down in the jungle where nobody goes,
a great big gorilla sits,
picking his nose
he picks it
and he flicks it
and sees where it goes -
who's going to catch it,
who's going to catch it,
who's going to catch it?
nobody knows"

Whichever unfortunate Brownie gets the 'snot' in her hand as the song finishes is out, and has to put her right hand behind her back. Then if she's out again, she puts the left hand behind her back and has to pass it on with her head. If she's out again she has to sit with her back to the circle, and so it carries on until one Brownie remains and she's the winner.

Needless to say children of a certain age love it - nothing like singing songs about bodily functions usually frowned upon by grown ups is there?

As for EYPS evidence - definitely leading practice in discussing activities which promote children's problem solving, reasoning and numeracy development, I'd say! [smile icon]
-HappyMaz ; http://www.foundation-stage.info/forums/lofiversion/index.php/t12746.html ;
March 31, 2008

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THE WASHER WOMAN (Version #2 of Down In The Jungle Where Nobody Goes)
We used to sing

Down in the jungle where nobody goes
There's a big fat gorilla picking his nose
With a pick - pick here and a pick - pick there
Who going to catch his bogie?

We would stand in a circle hands laying in each others - and then as we sang the Leader/Chosen girl would start by moving their right hand onto the girl on their lefts right hand, who would do the same and so on. When the verse ended whoever 'caught the bogie' would be out. Then you keep going, making the circle smaller until you are left with the winner.

Hoping that made sense!

(oh and when we played with the younger girls, when they were out they went and made another circle to carry on playing 'for fun' - so no-one wins/loses in the second circle. Though it's just as much fun for them to watch the first circle play to the end.)

We tended to like disgusting songs and games.
-Pompey_Ranger (Portsmouth, Hampshire East, The United Kingdom); http://www.guiders.co.uk/showthread.php/11639-washer-women ; "washer women ????????"; March 23, 2009

Editor: On the next day, another poster (fenris from Edinburgh) wrote this comment:

"We have a first verse too -
Down on the banks of the hanky-panky
Where the bullfrogs leap from bank to banky
With an eep, ipe, ope, arp,
Leaps off a lily and he goes ker-plop
fenris (Edinburgh); http://www.guiders.co.uk/showthread.php/11639-washer-women/page2?s=d8f45...
"washer women ????????"; March 24, 2009

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DOWN IN THE JUNGLE WHERE NOBODY GOES (Version #3)
We sing this one too, but the words are slightly different,

Down in the jungle where nobody goes
There's a big fat gorilla picking his nose
He picks it, and he flicks it just to see where it goes
Now who's gonna catch, who's gonna catch, who's gonna catch, his smiley SNOT!

All the while the song is being sung the girls are clapping round in a circle (as described above) and this gets faster and faster throughout the song, especially with the last line. Then you shout the word "SNOT" and the final clap indicates who is out! -mmwwaahh211 (London) http://www.guiders.co.uk/showthread.php/11639-washer-women/page2?s=d8f45... ; "washer women ????????"; March 24, 2009

E,F
EENEY MEENEY MACARACA (Jump Rope)
For us it was always, and will always be

Eeney meeney macaraca
Air-eye dominaca
Chickaraca boomaraca
Bom bom French

This chorus was usually skipped to. We never gave a thought to the meaning of course, and never saw it written down. If it had been written, there would naturally have been fewer variations around the country.

Don't you love this kind of reminiscence? Mind you, I wouldn't want a whole morning of it.............off to work!
- Guest, wystan ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=47148 ; eena meena mackeracka (children's rhymes) ; September 17, 2008

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/choosing-it-rhymes to find examples of Eeney Meeney Macaraca as a counting out (choosing it) rhyme.

EENIE MEENIE OOP PAH LEENIE and similarly sounding/spelled words are often used as the introduction to "Take A Peach, Take A Plum" and "Ooh Aah, I Wanna Piece of Pie" rhymes. However, I remember this verse independent of those other lines. See examples of "Oah Aah, I Wanna Piece Of Pie" and "Take A Peach, Take A Plum" rhymes on this page.

EENIE MEENIE OOP PAH LEENIE (Version #1; Jump Rope)
Eenie Meanie epsodeenie
Ooh aah umbaleenienee
Ashie Mashie Koh kah lashie
I_ love_ you
-Azizi Powell, childhood memories (Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s)

Editor:
This rhyme is sometimes titled "Take A Peach Take A Plum". These words are written phonetically. I have no idea what the correct spelling is. The underscore means that there is a space before saying the next word.

See examples of "Eenie Meenie" choosing it rhymes on http://www.cocojams.com/content/choosing-it-rhymes

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EENIE MEEINE JUSTA LEANIE (Version #2)
Eenie Meanie Justa Leanie
Ooca laca Trackalacka, I love you.
Take a peach, Take a plum
Take a piece of bubble gum.
Teacher, Teacher, Dummy Dum
Gimme back my bubble gum.
Saw you with your boyfriend last night.
How do you know?
I was peekin' through the keyhold.
NOSY
Wash them dishes
LAZY
Jump out the window
CRAZY
Peaches on the tree, Bananas on the floor
Jump back baby. I Don't Love You No More!
-Donetta A. (Pittsburgh, PA 1984); collected by Azizi Powell,
1998; posted on Cocojams by Azizi on 2/26/2006

Editor:
Donetta, an African American woman I know, said she learned this rhyme when she was growing up from her cousin who visited her from the South. There are many versions of this rhyme. For instance, I've seen the line "Jump back, baby I don't love you no more", often given as "Step back, baby etc". See "Ooh Ah" rhymes below for other examples that I believe are related to this large family of rhymes.

****
EENIE MEEINE PEPSA DEENIE (Example #3)
Under the Hand Clapping rhymes right after the ABC rhyme is part of a song I learned from an Elementary music teacher in Jackson, TN in 1977! I was a student teacher and she taught it as such.

X X X X
Eenie meenie pepsa deenie
X X X X
Be bop, bop a deenie
X X X X
Education, liberation
X X X X
I love you. Tootie Fruitie,
X X X X
Down, down su-gar
X X x x
Down by the roller coaster
X X X X
Sweet sweet honey -
X X X X
no place to go _ _ _ _
X X X X
a-oh _ _ _
X X X X
Shamrock, Shamrock
X X X X
shammy shammy shamrock
X X X X
Caught you with my girlfriend
(scrape your pointer finger at each other)
Naughty naughty
X X X X
Didn't do the dishes
(two hands together and place beside head, tilted as in sleeping)
Lazy, Lazy
X X X X
Ate all the candy
(Open palms facing partner fingers spread out squeezing the outer digit)
Greedy, Greedy
X X X X
Jumped out the window
(right hand pointer finger circle the ear)
Crazy, Crazy!
samirich (Sammy R.) ; private electronic message to Azizi via Mudcat Discussion Forum; 3/2006

Editor:
My assumption is that the Xs represent the clapping pattern that is used while reciting this rhyme. Notice that some lines in this rhyme are very similar to lines that are found in the "Down Down Baby" (Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa) and "I Love Coffee I Love Tea" family of rhymes

Here's a video of two grils doing a handclap game to a version of this rhyme:

Eenie Meanie Sassaleeny Clapping Songs

Posted by sharonmnich
October 02, 2009

"Kids Clapping Songs"

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EENIE MEEINE SYSA LEANNY (Example #4)
Hi I live in East Harlem in New York and hand games are very much alive.

Eeny Meeny
Sys a leeny,
ooh aah tumble leeny,
ochy Cochy Liver achy
I Love you.
Take a peach
take a plum
not a stick of bubble gum.
No peach no plum
just a stick of bubble gum.
I saw you with your boyfriend last night.
I looked through the window.
Nosey.
I ate a bag of cookies.
Greedy.
I didn't take a bath.
Dirty.
I jumped out the window .
Now I know you crazy.
I like icecream
I like tea
I like the color boys
and they like me
so step off white boy
you don't shine,
I'm gonna get my boyfriend
to kick your behind.
He'll kick you up,
he'll kick you down,
he'll kick you all around the town.

(very racial driven at the end I know)
-Guest, KLC (East Harlem, New York, New York) ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes? ; July 10, 2008

Editor:

Here's is part of the response that KLC posted to my request that she provide demographical information about who plays this rhyme and other rhymes she shared:
"The children that play these games range from 5 - 12 years old. Both boys and girls play these games but girls are more into it and know a lot more hand games then the boys. The children that I see playing these games are Hispanic, African American, Carribean, Caucasian and Asian because that is the population that I serve at my program."

****
EENIE MEEINE SISALANIE (Example #5)
another version :

Eennie Mennie
Sisalenie
achi achi livarochi .
take a peach
take a plum
take a stick of bubble gum
no peach no gum
no stick of bubble gum
saw you with your bf last name
looking through window
noisy
didnt watch the dishes
lazy
thats why they call u
eenie meenie sisaleny achie achie livarochi i hate u
italygirls2268 ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBVksBh0cLg&feature=related ; Eenie Meanie Sassaleeny Clapping Songs ; September 2010

Edited: "name" is probably a typo for "night"

****
ELEVATOR PLAYGROUND SONG
The first elevator said STOP!
The second elevator said STOP!
The third elevator said keep on going untll you mess UP!*

*Do fast handclap exchanges until one partner messes up
- Uploaded by irenekistler on Apr 7, 2011; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TzOM3jbqQAw&feature=relmfu

Here's that video:

Eeavotor Playground

Uploaded by irenekistler on Apr 7, 2011

-snip-
The "don't stop till someone messes up line" reminds me of the "don't stop till your hands get hot" line in the rhyme "Mama Mama Can't You See". Click http://cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 for examples of that rhyme.

****
ENGLAND, IRELAND (Version #1, Elastics)
I used to play this in Brisbane, Australia back in the early 90s. The rhymes I can remember are:

England
Ireland
Scotland
Wales
Inside
Outside
Inside
Out
-Guest; 2/14/2008; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=98 ; Child's Game: Elastics

****
ENGLAND, IRELAND (Elastics; Version #2)
Elastics used to be something everyone played... [Sidney, Australia]

Yeah, we used knickers elastics too, and it went from ankles, to knees, under-bums, hips, armpits then necks.

England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales. Inside outside inside on. Basically the same (as the movements she wrote for "Jingle Jangle) You basically, straddle one side, bounce until you get to the next word. At inside outside, you do just that, jump inside then out side, continue the bouncing, then step on it]
-Guest,Cath.; 3/1/2008; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=98 ; Child's Game: Elastics

Editor: See "Jingle Jangle" posted below.

****
ET FROM OUTER SPACE (Version #1)
ET. ET.
ET from outer space.
He has an ugly face.
Sittin in a rocket
eatin very tocket
watchin the clock go
Tick tock
tick tock shawally wally
ABCDEFG
You betta get your black hands offa me
You gotta smoooth cho
You gotta smoooth cho
You gotta smooth, smooth, smooth, smooth, smooth.
Now Freeze!

(alternative last line: My mama said "Black eye peas").
-Kiera, African American girl, 8 years old, (Pleasantville, New Jersey) and Kion, African American male, 6 years old, (Pleasantville, New Jersey), 11/8/2008

Editor:
I want to thank my great niece & great nephew, Kiera and Kion, for sharing this rhyme with me. Their mother, Kiemon, told me that she recited this same rhyme when she was a child. The "ET" in the rhyme is the lead character from the hit 1982 American science fiction movie, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E.T._the_Extra-Terrestrial for more information about this movie.

The rhyme "ET From Outer Space" is a version of the rhyme "Miss Sue From Alabama". In answer to my question, I learned that neither Kiemon nor her children knew the "Miss Sue From Alabama" rhyme. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 for examples of that rhyme.

If this were a more text analysis oriented page, I'd have quite a bit to say about the line "get your black hands off of me". But this page is mostly just for presenting examples of rhymes. So the only thing I'll say is that unfortunately, this version of "ET From Outer Space" isn't the only one example of a Black children's rhymes where "black" skin color is mentioned in an uncomplimentary way. For another example of this line, read Version #3 of "I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl" found below on this page.

****
ET FROM OUTER SPACE (Version #2)
E.T.::clap clap::
E.T.::clap clap::
E.T. from outer spaceee
he had an ugly face
sittin in a rocker eatin betty crocker
watchin the clock go tick tock
tick tock she walla wala
tick tock she walla wala
A. B.C.D. E. F.G.
YOU BETTA CET CHO BLACK HANDS OFFA ME
I gota smooth shaa(?_
I gota smooth shaa(?_
I gota smooth smooth smoth smooth shaa(?)
and then u say sumthin like ya name and then go FREEZE! LOL!
-SharmaineB; (African American female; no location given),
http://bn-in.facebook.com/notes.php?id=505682703&_fb_noscript=1; “HandClaps Throwbacks”; posted 2007; retrieved 9/15.2009

****
ET FROM OUTER SPACE (Version #3)
ET
ET
ET from outer space.
He had an ugly face.
Sitting in a rocket.
Eating chocolate.
Watching soap operas
All day long.
A B C D E F G
Get your black hands off of me. *
Now freeze! **
-Naijah S.; (African American female, 9 years old; Hazelwood section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; January 14, 2011; Collected by Azizi Powell 1/14/2011

Editor:
Naijah recited this rhyme without my asking for it by name. She said that that "ABCDEFG" part is used in another rhyme which she later recited. See "I Am A First Grader" on this page.

* I said to Naijah that I heard that "get your Black hands off of me line before in other rhymes and I wondered if if meant that people were ashamed of being Black. Naijah looked shocked and said "I enjoy my heritage".

** Naijah said that "freeze" meant that whoever moved first, loses.

****
F,G,H
FLEA FLY FLOW (CUMALA VISTA)
Examples of this rhyme are given without regard to their title.

FLEA FLY FLO (Example #1)
...Used to sing it as a brownie and guide. the rhythm is done by slapping your thighs then clapping your hands.

FLEA
(All lines are done by the leader then echoed)

Flea
Flea fly
Flea fly flo
vista

Cumala, cumala, cumala vista
Oh no no no no da vista
Eeney meaney decimeaney ooh wala wala meaney ex a meaney sal a meaney ooh wala wa
Beat biddley oten doten bobo da beeten doten Shhhhht.

Then you do it FAST!!!
-alison,- http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8951 meaning -musha ring dumma do dumma da, February 1, 1999
-snip-
Brownies and guides" are levels of the "Girl Scouts". The rhyme "bobo sku doten botten" or similar titles is found on this page.

****
FLEA FLY FLO (Example #1)
My version is the same as Alison's until the first line that ends with vista (but I learned vistey not vista).
FLEA

Each line is echoed back to the leader.

Flea (Flea) Flea fly (Flea fly) Flea fly flo (Flea fly flo) Vistey (Vistey)

Cumala, cumala, cumala vistey

Oh no no no not the vistey

Vistey ( and then it really changes!)

Eeney meney dis a leenee, ooh ahh ahh meleenee Otchicotchee oochirachee, ooh ahh ooh. Ish bibili oaten doten, why not in doten toten, bo bo ski doten toten hey don areema!

This was always a camp song that was lots of fun because you got faster each time until everyone just collapsed in laughter. I've heard other versions but this is the only one I've ever been able to learn.
-karen k, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8951 meaning -musha ring dumma do dumma da, February 1, 1999

****
FLEA FLY FLEW (Example #3)
flea (flea)
fly (fly)
flea fly flew (ditto)
coomalata coomalata coomalata beestay
no no no no not the beestay

and ended in a sort of scat-rhythm: eee-biddlety-oaten-doaten-wahbat-skee-watten-tatten-SHHHHHHHHHHHHH !!!!
-Bonnie S.; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=47148 RE: eena meena mackeracka (children's rhymes);7/1/2006

****
FLEA (Example #4, #5, #6)
In this song, the song leader sings (says) a line and the audience repeats the line. Keep the beat by alternately slapping thighs and clapping hands:

Flea!
Flea Fly!
Flea Fly Mosquito!
Oh no no no no Mosquito!
Get that big bad bug with the bug spray!
PSSSSSSSSSSH (spray can sound)

Repeat three or more times, each time a little faster.

Another Version:

Flea!
Flea Fly!
Flea Fly Flo!
Eenie, meenie, decimeenie, oo wall a wall a meenie!
Ex a meenie, zoll a meenie, oo wall a wall!
Beep billy ott in dotten oh bo ba beaten dotten shh!

Flea!
Flea fly!
Flea fly flow!
Kumalata kumalata kumalata veeslay!
Oh, no no no, not the veeslay.
Ich a mini, satch a mini, oo walla walla mini.
Des a mini, satch a mini, oo walla wall.
A beat billy oaten bobin obo a boatin bobin obo a boatin bobin boatin bobin boatin bobin boatin bobin sssshhh...

Fleas (audience repeats)
Fleas Flies (audience repeats)
Fleas Flies Mosquitos (audience repeats)
Calimine, calimine, calimine lotion
Oh no, no more calimine lotion
Itsy bitsy, teeny weeny, itty bitty
Nasty bitey mosquito -- SQUASH (squash is yelled at top of lungs)

Flea!

Flea Fly!
Flea Fly Flo!
Vista
Coo-ma-la, Coo-ma-la, Coo-ma-la Vista
Oh no-no, no, not the vista
Eenie, meenie, decimeenie, oo walla walla meenie!
Ex a meenie, zoll a meenie, oo walla wall!
Beep billy ott in dotten oh bo ba beaten dotten shh!
- Susan Best, Ev Holm, Cathy Porter, http://www.macscouter.com/songs/Repeat.asp [retrieved 1/27/2013]

Click http://cocojams.com/content/flea-fly-flow-cumala-vista-sources-and-examples for information about the probable sources, and for additional examples (including videos) of this song. Here's a link to a shortened version of that page on my cultural blog:
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/01/flea-fly-flow-cumala-vista-rhyme... The Flea Fly Flow (Cumala Vista) Rhyme & Songs That Helped It Grow

****
FORGET THAT BOOM BOOM BOOM
Editor: This example comes from a YouTube video. I'm adding it because I want to document and show the different patterns of handclaps that the girls use. I've attempted to transcribe the words that two girls in a YouTube video are chanting, but wasn't able to understand all of the words. The information from the video uploader's YouTube profile indicates that she is from the United Kingdom. It's therefore likely that these girls are also from the UK. "Down Down Baby, Version #21, is another video from the same video uploader that I've posted on this page. Several more videos of rhymes from the same uploader can be found on YouTube.

In addition to [what I consider to be] an accent, the girls are speaking fast, and only one part of the rhyme is familiar to me. I've placed brackets around the lines that I don't understand, dashes for words that I believe are missing, and question marks after the brackets to designate the lines of this rhyme that I'm not able to understand. I've also written a message to the video's uploader asking her for help in transcribing this rhyme. I'll ammend this example if and when I receive additional information. If you are familiar with this rhyme (which I think is more than one rhyme combined together), please send in the words that you know to cocojams17@yahoo.com. Thanks!

Here's that rhyme:

Forget that boom boom boom
Forget that boom boom boom
Forget that boom boom boom
Forget that boom

[Some people may thing I’m nothing
But I just think I’m pretty
Sitting on the back peacefully
No one better not talk to me
- - - -
No lie ]???

My name is Elvis Presley.
Girls are sexy
sitting in the back seat drinkin Pepsi.
Had a baby
Named her daisy
Do me a favor
Drop dead.
-Courtney & Shinice (t3delrowland-video uploader) ;United Kingdom; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QreglYFswJ4&NR=1 ;July 08, 2009 [retrieved on September 10, 2010]

Here's the video:

Courtney & Shinice Clapping Game

t3delrowland | July 08, 2009

-snip-

Editor: I believe that this rhyme is actually a combination of three seperate rhymes, or more accurately, introductory lines, and two seperate rhymes. In my opinion, the repeated phrase "Forget that boom boom" are introductory lines and the first rhyme begins with the words that I have difficulty understanding I think this first rhyme, or that portion of the rhyme begins with the words "Some people may thing I’m nothing/but I just think I’m pretty". The third portion of the rhyme (or the second and last rhyme) is the widely known "Girls are sexy" rhyme. Other examples of that rhyme are found on this page.

****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #1) Jump Rope rhyme
From my eleven-year-old daughter come these jump rope rhymes. She says they don't sing them, they are more of a chant than a song. They do this at school during recess.

Fudge, fudge, call the judge, (Sally's*) having a baby.
Wrap it up in toilet paper, send it down the elevator,
What shall it be?
Boy, girl, twins, triplets, boy, girl, twins, triplets...
(repeat until jumper misses)
*substitute jumper's name
-Jon W; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300#23452 Cinderella Dressed in Yella; March 10, 1998

Editor: This rhyme is sometimes called "Mommy's Having A Baby". However, from this example and the following examples, you can also see the practice of using a girl's name (the one jumping?) as the one who is "having a baby".
.
****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #2) Handclap Rhyme
Two African American girls behind me on the 86B bus [Pittsburgh, PA} were happily chanting:
Oh My! Don't Cry! Mommy's having a baby!
Daddy's going crazy!
If it's a boy I'll give it a toy!
And if it's a girl! I'll give it a curl!
wrap it up in toilet paper! send it down the escalator.

It was accompanied with clapping and gestures. There was also some discussion of wrapping babies in toilet paper, the conclusion being that this would not be a good idea.
-LadyJean; "Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes ; September 22, 2003

****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #3) Jump Rope Rhyme
fudge, fudge!
call the judge!
_______'s havin a baby,
_______'s goin crazy!
wrap it up in toilet paper,
send it down the elevator.
boy, girl, twins, triplets?
repeat until jumper screws up, and that is what she supposidly had, lol!
- lexy; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php ; June 24, 2005

Editor: Unfortunately, this website isn't accessible anymore.

****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #4) Jump Rope Rhyme
Fudge, gudge, call the judge!
[girl's name] Is having a baby!
Hey boyfriend's going crazy!
Wrap it up and toiliet paper,
Send it down the elevator.
what will it be?
A boy?
A girl?
Twins or aliens?
A boy?
A girl?
Twins or aliens?
[Jumprope game. Player jumps until they mess up. Whatever they land on is what they have.]
-Liz again. http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php ; April 12, 2005

Editor:
I think that 'grudge' maybe a typo. But it may not be..

****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #5) Jump Rope Rhyme
Growing up in suburban Detroit in the fifties, many of the ones you post are familiar to me.

[other examples].

And,
Oh fudge, oh joy
Momma's got a baby boy
Wrap him up in tissue paper
Put him in the 'frigerator.
-Barbara (Detroit ,Michigan) http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350 I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes; May 26, 2005

****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #6) Jump Rope Rhyme
This rhyme was heard in Athol, MA in the 1950's:
Fudge, fudge, call the judge,
Mama's got a new-born baby
It's not a boy
It's not a girl
It's just an ordinary baby
Wrap it up in tissue paper,
Send it down the elevator,
First floor - Miss! [skipper to catch to rope between legs]
Second floor -Miss! [Continues until skipper fails]
- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipping-rope_rhyme

Edito: The editors ot this Wikipedia page preface this example and several other examples of "Fudge Fudge Call The Judge" with this statement:
"Many rhymes consist of pure nonsense, often with a suggestion of naughtiness”
-snip-

I don't think that this rhyme is an example of nonsense at all. It might be an example of naughtiness, bu it also could be considered an expression of children's insecurity and fear that a new sibling will cause them to be replaced in their mother's affection. In addition, I believe that the "send it down the elevator, first floor-Miss!, Second floor Miss!" lines showcase the wit & creative word play of children (or whoever composed these rhymes),

Furthermore, it's likely that this rhyme has it's source in the old American folk songs "What'll I Do With the Baby-O" and that song has even older American roots. Here's the text to a version of that song:

What'll we do with the baby?
What'll we do with the baby?
What'll we do with the baby-o?
We'll wrap it up in calico,
Wrap it up in calico,
And send it to it's pappy-o.

Source: Sharp's EFSSA No 228
Mrs. Alice Wilson Pineville, Ky. 1917

Hat tip to Richie who wrote this comment on January 18, 2007 about that song:

"This may be the earliest collected version of "What'll We Do With the Baby?" from Cecil Sharp. The "What'll We Do With the Baby?" songs are part of the song family that includes "Prettiest Gal in the County-O" and "Sugar in my Coffee-O." All three songs originate indirectly from "Dandy Jim From Caroline" and similar parodies from the 1800's."

http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=98173&messages=13 What Shall We Do With The Baby-O.

-snip-

Visit that Mudcat thread for more examples of the folk song "What'll We Do With The Baby".

****
FUDGE FUDGE CALL THE JUDGE (Version #7)
I know:

Fudge Fudge Call the judge,
Mamma's hav'n a baby.
Not a boy
Not a girl
Just a plain ol' baby
It better not cry
It better not scream
Or 'ill kick it into the
washing machine.
Up and Down she blowsssssss.
Fudge Fudge call the judge,
Mamma's hav'n a baby
It's a boy
Its's a girl.
(Clap Clap Clap)
She got twins and a big ol' chin.

REPEAT ENTIRE ONCE MORE THEN SING:

She got one, two, three little ones 4, 5, 6, little ones (And so on.)
-Emma.
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/12/fudge-fudge-call-judge-twins-tri... , 3/15/2012

****
GIMME A BREAK (Version #1)
Gimme a break,gimme a break, break me off a piece of that kit kat bar
Gimme a break, gimme a break
Break me off a piece of that
Kit Kat bar
-anonymous, October 20, 2005 (Alberta Canada)

****
GIMME A BREAK (Version #2)
We do this in Grade 5

Gimme a break,gimme a break, break me off a piece of that kit kat bar
choclaty taste, makes my day, break me of a piece of that kit kat bar
i don't care what people say, just break me off a piece of that,gotta have a piece a that, gimme a piece of that KIT KAT BAR!
- Guest, me; Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes? http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097; June 22, 2009

****
GRANDMA GRANDMA SICK IN BED
grandma grandma sick in bed
Called the doctor n the dr. Said
Get up old lady! U aint sick
All you need is a pepperint stick
Hands up! Shake shake
Shake shake
Hands down. Shake shake
Shake shake
all around.Shake shake
Shake shake
-Guest, ty; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300&messages=171 Children's Street Songs; January 6, 2011

Editor: The early 20th century version of this rhyme was "Get up grandma/you ain't sick/ all you need is a hickory stick' (meaning a beating with a hard stick). This rhyme harks back to times of African American enslavement when the enslaved person had to work no matter how sick she or he was.

This verse is often recited as part of "Down Down Baby".. Examples of that rhyme are posted above.

*****
HAMBONE
Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/african-american-secular-slave-songs to find text examples, commentary, and a video of "Hambone". Also, see "Hey Concentration" below for a rhyme that includes the line "where you been/round the corner and back again"

****
HANDS UP EIGHTY-FIVE
See the entry for Concentration

****
HELLO HELLO HELLO SIR (Jump Rope & Elastics Jumping)
Hello Hello Hello sir
meet you at the show sir
no sir
why sir
'cause I've got a cold sir
where'd you get the cold sir
at the north pole sir
what you dioing there sir
catching polar bears sir
how many did you catch sir
one sir
two sir
three sir
four sir
.... ten sir
all the rest were dead sir
how did they die sir
eating apple pie sir
what was in the pie sir
three dead flies sir
what was in the flies sir
three dead germs sir
what was in the germs sir
I don't know sir
shall we start again sir
no sir
why sir
because I've got a cold sir....
-Guest; 1/2/2007; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=98 ; Child's Game: Elastics

****
HEY BURRITO
This is a fun repeat rhyme that my friend taught me in 6th grade.

Leader: Hey, Burrito! (followers repeat each line)
Leader: Hey, hey, hey burrito! (echo)
Leader: Mmm yeah, burrito yeah (echo)
Leader: Taco bell taco bell! (echo)
Leader: Guacamole, cinnamon twist! (echo)
Ish bibbly oken tokon
no no paroken token no not paraken taken shhhh….

(the last part we just added on because it was fun to say)
-Katie S. (White female, 17 years old, Dallas, Texas), 10/6/2009

Editor:
I'm not sure if this is a handclap rhyme or not, but I wanted to add it to a Cocojams page, and this page fit it the best. Other examples of "bibbly oken tokon" are found above under "boo boo bin oten toten" or similarly spelled words.

****
HEY CONCENTRATION (Double Dutch Jump Rope rhyme)
Hey concentration
Where have you been
Around the corner
And back again
Stole my money
Stole my honey
Mama's got the hiccups
Daddy's got the flu.
Now come on boys
Let's slice the ice.
Slice it 1
Slice it 2
Slice it 3 4 5
Slice it 6
Slice it 7
Slice it 8 9 10
Hey everybody
Come on and do your thing.
2 up bop, bop.
2 down bop, bop
2 up bop, bop.
2 down bop, bop
2 up
-Elnora Fulton and Pat Smith "Let's Slice The Ice" (St Louis, MO.; Magnamusic-Baton, 1978, p 27)

Editor:
The authors noted that this is a Double Dutch Jump Rope rhyme. Here are the performance directions for jumping double dutch that the authors included with this rhyme:

"Two players face each other, holding two ropes, one in each hand. The right hand of one player turns one rope counterclockwise, and his left hand turns the other rope clockwise.

The right hand of the second player turns counterclockwise and his left hand turns clockwise. The right hand and left hands of each player correspond in moving.

One child "jumps in" when one rope is up in the air and the other is down. His foot pattern is a skip from side to side."

-snip-

It's interesting that the authors used the pronoun "his" instead of "her" since traditionally most Double Dutch jumpers have been female. I think the use of that male pronoun reflects 1970s grammatical practices, and shouldn't be read to mean that the players were males.

In the context of this rhyme,"slice the ice" is probably a rhymical movement or dance step in which the person slides from one side to another.

Here's a very brief YouTube video of girls doing Double Dutch and chanting a rhyme which appears to me to be the same rhyme as "Hey Concentration" above. Instead of "Come on boys" the girls say "Come on girls" .And then, unfortunately, that YouTube video ends.

Rhyme Talk in their Street Games

nickyd75 | May 29, 2010

"Small clip to go with a 3 part article on the history of Double Dutch and it's connection to Hip Hop culture. www.holyrollerproductions.com/featured/ready-your-ropespart-3-rhythm-and... "
-snip-
Some videos showcased in this online article contain profanity.

Note that the commentator in the video indicates that "It's an overnight phenomenon-rapping to the beat". Of course, chanting rhymes while jumping rope isn't "an overnight phenomenon". Yet connecting the activity of chanting jump rope rhymes with rapping is astute. Unfortunately, the custom of chanting rhymes while jumping Double Dutch and single rope appears to be a dying art, perhaps because Double Dutch. is now largely considered a competitive sport. Although some adults are attempting to revive the custom of children and teens jumping Double Dutch, regretfully, the practice of chanting rhymes while jumping appears to largely have been omitted from that revival.

****
HIGH LOW PICCALO / HIGH LOW JACKALOW
Editor: Featured examples from this family are posted together regardless of their "titles".

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-rhyme-gigalo-examples-probable... for a post on this rhyme/cheer. Also click http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 to find examples of "Gigalo" . Those cheers include the lines "my hands up high/ my feet down low/ and this is the way I gigalo". Additional video examples of "Gigalo" can be found on http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-camp-songs

HIGH LOW PECCALOW (Version #1)
my name is high low peccalow,
peccalow,high low high low
peccalow peccalow yo
thats my name don't ware it out..
high low peccalow peccalow Yo

(try to tap the other person on the forehead before they tap you)
-Guest-me and my friends love this one; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 "Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?"; 6/5/2007

Editor:
Here's a video example of the handclap game "(My Name Is) High Low Jackalow":

Han and Rhys - High Low Jackalow

Uploaded by hanyakebanya on Nov 19, 2009

-snip-
I believe that the card game “High Low Jack” is most likely the source of the hand clapping game “High Low Jackalow” and the foot stomping/movement rhyme “Gigalo” (or “Jigalo”). Other names for the “High Low Jack” card game are “Pitch”, “All Fours”, Old Sledge etc

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HIGH LOW JACKALO (Version #2)
Very interesting how these rhymes etc. are spread across continents.

Version of the above, called "Jackalo", as a handclapping song, played by middle-class white British girls in private school, Essex, just outside Greater London, end 20th/beginning 21st century:

My name is [each partner holds hands together, palm to palm, as if "praying", then each pair of hands brushes the other]

Hands now parted. Partners face each other.
[Whilst the rest of the song is sung, left hand is held straight out, as if waiting to shake hands. Right hands meet, high and low, to match the rhythm of the song]:

Hi, low, Jackalo, Jackalo, Jackalo,
Hi, low, Jackalo, Jackalo and HIGH !
- jeanie; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807; Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers; 4/15/2007

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HIGH LOW PECCALOW (Version #3)
We have a different version of "high low peccalow" here (Herts, England).
Instead of peccalow it reads:

My names is ....
High Low Jigga-low
Jigga-low high Low

High Low Jigga-low
Jigga-low high

You hold onto your friend's right hand with yours and your left hands make contact.
When the song says high, you clap above the joined hands, when the song says low you clap below and when the song says Jigga you clap on the joined hands.
The aim is to run through the song as fast as possible without mucking up the clapping.
We're 17 now, but we still sometimes play it if we've nothing better to.
Usually the most muck ups happen on the second line where it goes low high.
-Guest ,Amon; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097
"Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?"; 11/25/2007

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HI SUE ELLA
I know a little Dutch girl
Called
Hi
Shoe
Ella
All the boys at the football club say
Hi
Shoe
Ella
How is your father
All right
Died at the chip shop
Last night
What was he eating
Raw fish
How did it happen
Like this
DevilBunny; http://msgboard.snopes.com/message/ultimatebb.php?/ubb/get_topic/f/95/t/... Skipping and clapping rhymes ; February 13, 2003

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HOLLYWOOD GOES SWINGIN' (Hand clap Version #1)
[Both girls]
Hollywood.
Hollywood.
Hollywood goes swingin.
Hollywood goes SWINGIN.
Swingin for the good times.
Swingin for the bad times.
[One girl]
My name is Teneisha
and I’m number 9.
I’m kickin it with Ginuwine.*
If you ever see me on the street,
you better speak.
“Long time, no see.”
Sexy as I wanna be.
Some hittin me high.
Some hittin me low.
Some hittin me in my-
Don’t ask what.
My b u t t b u t t butt.
That’s what.
-Teneisha (10 years) and Antoinette (11 years) (African American females, East Hills section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1998; collected by Azizi Powell, 1998
Editor:
* Kickin it" means "relaxing with" ; "hangin" with (socializing with).

"Ginuwine" is a popular young African R&B singer. Three other late 1990s variations of this line that I have heard are “Kickin it with Busta Rhymes (the name of a popular male Hip-Hop star) “Kickin it with Scooby Doo (the name of a canine cartoon figure) and “Kickin it with Winnie the Poo” (the name of a fictitious bear in children's stories).

The lines "If you ever see me on the street/you better speak" is taunting/braggadocio statement that the presence of that girl should be acknowledged by all those who see her. "Long time, no see” is a common saying that African Americans (and other Americans) use when greeting a person. The line "sexy as I wanna be" isn't something that a person would say out loud. Instead, I believe that that line just reflects why the chanter believes that she is worthy of attention from people walking down the street. That line can be interpreted to mean "I'm real sexy".

I was surprised to see this rhyme performed as a hand clap routine as I had previously seen it performed as a foot stomping cheer. Those two girls don’t remember that “Hollywood Goes Swinging” ever being performed as a foot stomping cheer. As a matter of fact, no one I've asked remembers that rhyme being performed as a cheer. As a matter of fact, no one I've asked remembers that rhyme being performed as a cheer. That includes my daughter who is the source of most of the mid 1980s foot stomping cheers that I've collected, and who has a very clear memory of those other foot stomping cheers. But she only vaguely remembers "Hollywood Goes Swingin" being performed as a foot stomping cheer. However, apart from the performance of the earliest example of that rhyme that I've found (the 1978 Mother Hippletoe record) being described as "girls imitating cheerleaders", it seems to me that the foot stomping roots of "Hollywood Swinging" rhymes are evident in the fact that some of its lines are recited by one person at a time. In contrast, hand clap rhymes almost always recited in unison. In the case of this example of "Hollywood Swinging", the first girl says most of the rhyme while she and the other girl does hand clap routine. The girls then repeat the rhyme with the other girl saying the same words or slightly different words.

I asked Teneisha and Antoinette if they ever chanted "Hollywood Swinging" while doing foot stomps. They weren't sure what "foot stomping" meant so my daughter who was part of the game song program that I'm conducted demonstrated how to do the steppin performance that I call "foot stomps". The girls said that they didn't ever "do" "Hollywood Swingin" that way nor did they remember ever seeing anyone else perform that rhyme in any way other than as a hand clap game.

****
HOLLYWOOD GOES SWINGIN' (fragment; Hand clap Version #2)
Hollywood
Hollywood
Hollywood goes swingin
Hollywood goes __ swingin
Swingin for Northside.
Swingin for the Eastside.
My name is Rita.
I'm Number 9
Going down Chicago line.
If you see me on the street
You better speak [uncertain about the next words]
Hey hey, you think you cool.
Hey hey, cool enough to rule your school.
Hey hey, you think you bad.
Bad enough to [didn't remember the rest of the words to this rhyme]
-African American girls and boys; Northview Heights Buddy Program, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 19, 1999; collected by Azizi Powell

Editor:
This rhyme was performed as a hand clap routine. The girls who shared this rhyme said that the line might be "Hollywood keeps swingin". The dash means to pause one beat.

The girls said that another version is "swingin for the good times /swingin for the bad times/ swingin every time.

****
HOLLYWOOD GOES SWINGIN' (fragment; Hand clap Version #3)
Hollywood (clap clap clap)
Hollywood (clap clap clap)
Hollywood goes swingin.
My name is Shanika.
I'll bust it out.
I'll party to the left
I'll party to the right.
I'll party all night.
I'll party all day.

My name is Sandra.
I'm number one [don't remember the rest]
I'm busting all day.
I'm busting all night.
She's busting to the left.
She's busting to the right.
-Shanika and Sandra (African American females, under 11 years old) ; Garfied section of Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania; November 1, 2000; collected by Azizi Powell, November 1, 2000

****
HOLLYWOOD GOES SWINGIN' (Version #4)
Both girls:
Hollywood, Hollywood
Hollywood goes swingin
Partner #1:
My name is Raya and I'm number 2
Kickin it with Scooby Doo
Hit me high
Hit me low
Hit me where you wanna go.
Repeat the entire rhyme with the partner #1 saying the lines that partner #1 said, but substitute her name or nickname and (preferably) change the number rhyme
-ConRaya E. (11 years); Sha'Ona K. (11 years); African American girls; Pittsburgh, PA; 6/12/2008

Editor:
There are a number of similar titles for this rhyme. Among them are "Hollywood", "Hollywood Rocks Swingin", and "Hollywood Keeps Swinging". The rhyme is based on the 1973 R&B song "Hollywood Swinging" that was recorded by Kool & The Gang. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kz2evj6YfS4&feature=related for a YouTube video of this song. The tune for the handclap rhyme (and the foot stomping cheer with the same name) is very similar to this song, although the tempo is somewhat faster.

****
HOLLYWOOD (Version #5)
Here's a handclap called hollywood!

(person 1) My name is (your name) im number one my reputation's just begun so turn around and touch the ground get back up and break it down

(person 2) you think you're bad

(1) b-a-d i know im bad

(2) you tink you're cool

(1) cool enough to rule the school

(2) you think your fine

(1) fine fine blow your mind mind take em up take em back give the man a heart attack

(2) you think you're hott

(1) hott anough to blow your pot!

That's it....there's clapping and all but its too hard to explain on this...good luck!
-DC; 12/9/2005 ; http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php

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HOLLYWOOD (Versions #6.#7, and #8)
Editor: The following examples came from the same web page, and were posted one after another without any assigned numbers or without any indication of their performance activity. It appears that they were posted by the same person who may have been sharing different versions of this cheer from more than one other perrson. I'll cite that person's screen name & the web address at the end of version #7. I'm reposting these examples on Cocojam's foot stomping cheer page because of their very close similarities to examples of this cheer that have already been posted.]

[Version #6]

many differt ways to sing it but this is how i sing it:

Hollywood Hollywood
Hollywood go swinging
ooh she think she bad
B.A.D i know im bad
ooh she think she cool
cool cool like scooby doo
ooh she think she fine
fine fine like lemon lime
she think she cute
cute cute like gin and juice
my name is (insert name)
and im a super fly girl
it takes (#) boys to rock my world
go sexy go sexy go.
(then the person playing with you sayd the same thing.

[Version #7]
this is how i sing it

hollywood hollywood
hollywood go swinging
hollywood go swinging
my names (insert name) on the phone
with my daisy dukes on
if you see me in the streets
boy you best speak to me
uh she thinks shes b.a.d ,
at least i use a wash rag ,
ooh she thinks she cool
coolest girl in high school
ooh she thinks she fine
fine number nine
take me home bring me my man
back besta have my cadalicc back
bang bang choochoo train
come again another day
why not
because i can't
why not
cause my back hurts
from my bra to tight
my booty shake
to the left to the right
left right
shake that booty all night

[Version #8]
This is how i sing it

Hollywood Hollywood
Hollywood go swinging
Hollywood go swinging
my name is (Ur name) on the my cell
with my apple bottoms on
if you see me in the club
boy you better speak to me
uh she think she bad:
B.A.D i know I'm bad
uh she think she cool:
coolest girl in (whatever one Ur in elementary, middle etc)
uh she think she:
fine fine fine # 8
take your man up on a date
bring him home
bring him back
he best have my Cadillac
he bought me 1
he bought me 2
he married me
divorced you
bang bang choochoo train
come on girl lets do our thing
(other person) i cant
(you) why not
(other person) because i cant
(you) why not
(other person) because my back is ache-ing
and my bra is to tight
and my booty shaking
from the left to the right left right left right
-ID1122325703. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_the_words_to_the_hollywood_hand_clapp...
retrieved on September 20, 2010
-snip-
Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 to find foot stomping examples of "Hollywood Swingin' "

I,J
ICE CREAM
Ice Cream,
ice cream,
cherry,on top
how many boyfriends do you got
1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16..…

cntinue til sum 1 messes up jumprope game
-Guest, 17yr old kid at heart:); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300&messages=171 ; Children's Street Songs; July 20, 2010

****
i'M A LITTLE BUBBLE CAR (Elastics / Chinese Jump Rope)
One skipping rhyme I remember was :
I'm a little bubble car,
my number's forty eight,
I live around the cooooooooorner,(at which point, with the rope still being swung you'd jump out run around one of those swinging the rope and jump back in)
and I forgot to shut the gate. (you were supposed to time it so on the word gate you deliberately jumped to land with one foot either side of the rope trapping it)
-JudeL; Elastics; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932 ; April 28p 2002

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HAD A LITTLE CAR (Double Dutch Jump Rope)
...the one I recall goes like this (seems to be from the same original rhyme, whatever that was):

Had a little car
In Nineteen-forty-eight
Took it round the coooooooooooooner (same move, you jump out and run around one of the girls holding the rope and back in)
And slammed on the brake. (trap the rope with your feet)

Bumped into a lady, (make "bumping" moves with your hips while jumping)
Bumped into a man,
Bumped into a police car,
Man oh man! (raise up hands to face in shocked expression)

Policeman caught me,
Put me in jail,
All I had was
Ginger ale.
How many bottles did I get?
1...2...3...
At that point we'd be skipping double-Dutch rapidly, and continue counting skips till the skipper misses.)

That was from Kingston, Ontario, Canada in the mid-1970s.
- Diana, 3/16 /2012

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I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE (Jump Rope Rhyme)
I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe,
I won't be back til broad daylight,
if you let the witch get little sister Sue,
I'll spank you black, I'll spank you blue,
I'll spank you with the heel of my old rubber shoe

This is the version we used to jump rope to. Back in the 50's, Saginaw, MI
-Guest,blaine; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753&messages=46; "kids' game: I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe" ; February 27.2009

Editor:
A number of people remember this rhyme being recited not while jumping rope but while playing a running, hiding game. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-game-songs-and-movement-rhymes for additional examples of that rhyme and descriptions of its game activities.

Also click the above Mudcat address to read a number of other versions of this rhyme. It's interesting that most of the versions of "I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe" that are posted in that thread are from the state of Michigan. I'm not sure why that is.

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I'M A LITTLE NAVY GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE (Version #1 of I'm A Little Dutch Girl Dressed In Blue ; Jump Rope Rhyme)
I'm a little navy (or sailor) girl dressed in blue,
This is what I have to do:
Salute to the captain, (salute & jump)
Curtsey to the queen, (curtsey & jump)
Touch the bottom of the dirty submarine!

(bending over and touching the ground without missing my jump was always difficult for me)
At this point, the jumper had to escape without being hit by the rope.

Jump rope rhymes mid 1960s, Oxon Hill, Maryland
-Ann N; 4/30/2007

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I'M A LITTLE DUTCH GIRL DRESSED IN BLUE (Version #2) ; Jump Rope Rhyme
Hi All,

In Brooklyn, in the late 50s and very early 60s

I'm a little Dutch girl dressed in blue
Here are the things I'm taught to do
Salute to the captain
Bow to the queen
Turn my back on the US Marines
(No idea what this meant)
-Guest, Folklore (Brooklyn, New York); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055; Play Ground Hand Jives; July 27, 2007

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I'M A LITTLE DUTCH GIRLDRESSED IN BLUE (Version #3) Jump Rope Rhyme
(Act out the different things as you're jumping rope)

I'm a little Dutch girl dressed in blue,
Here are the things I like to do:

Salute to the captain (salute)
Bow to the queen (bow)
Turn my back on the submarine (turn around and face the other direction)
I can do the tap dance (dance)
I can do the splits (jump up high with legs apart)
I can do the hokey pokey (turn yourself around)
Just like this!
-http://www.fungameskidsplay.com/jump-rope-rhymes.htm ; retrieved September 1, 2010

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I AM A PRETTY LITTLE DUTCH GIRL [as pretty as can be]

Editor:
Examples of this rhyme are posted in this section regardless of their first line or title. Examples of the "I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl" family of rhymes always include the lines "my boyfriend's name is ___/He comes from __ (a city whose name rhymes with the boyfriend's name).

Many contemporary (post 1990s) versions of these rhymes that I've collected often start with the line "I'm a little __ grader" or "I'm a pretty little __ grader". This may be because the children know that they are not of "Dutch" descent, or the children don't know what "Dutch" means. The chanters recite the grade that they are in (for instance one girl might chant "I'm a pretty little second grader" while at the same time her partner might chant "I'm a pretty little third grader").

I'M A LITTLE DUTCH GIRL (Version #1)
I'm a little Dutch girl,
As pretty as can be,
And all the boys on the baseball team
Are crazy over me.

They gave me all their apples.
They gave me all their pears.
They gave me fifty cents
And kicked me down the stairs.

My mother wanted peaches.
My brother wanted pears.
My father wanted fifty cents
To fix the broken stairs.

My boyfriend gave me peaches.
My boyfriend gave me pears.
My boyfriend gave me fifty cents
To fix the broken stairs.

My mother ate the peaches.
My brother ate the pears.
My father ate the fifty cents
And fell right down the stairs.

My mother gave me peaches.
My father gave me pears.
My boyfriend kissed me on the cheek
And fell right down the stairs.

I am a little Dutch girl
As pretty as can be be be
And all the boys around my block
Are crazy over me me me.
-http://www.mudcat.org/jumprope/jumprope_display.cfm?rhyme_number=133; sources given Abrahams (1969), Knapp (1976), Hastings (1990)

Editor: Note the similarities between the references to "_gave me 50 cents/and kicked him down the stairs" and those lines in the "Miss Suzy Had A Steamboat" rhymes.

Here's a video clip of "I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl". In this clip the little girl recites "My boyfriend's name is Mello/He comes from the land of Jello":

"My little sister, singing Pretty Little Dutch Girl."

Posted by thebexperson
May 02, 2007

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WOOBLE WOOBLE WOOBLE (Version #2 of I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl)
Wooble Wooble Wooble
And ah 1, 2, 3
I am a lit tle first grader
as pretty as can be be.
and all the boys around my house
go crazy over me me.

My boyfriend's name is Yel low.
He comes from Ala ba ma
with 25 toes
and a pickle on his nose
and this is how the story goes

One day I was ah walk ing
I saw my boyfriend talk ing
to a very pretty girl
with strawberry curls.
And this is what she said

"I l. o. ve love you."
"I k. i. ss kiss you."
"I a d.ore adore you"
So s .t .o .p. STOP!
-female first grade students Tarea, Kayla, Kaylin (African American), and Ha and Hung (Vietnamese, ages 5-7 years old); Fort Pitt Elementary School {Pittsburgh Pa, 2000}; collected by Azizi Powell, 2000

Editor:
"Wooble Wooble Wooble/ and ah 1 2 3" is an introductory phrase. This line is also given as "Wooble Wooble Wooble and the deep blue sea". This rhyme is performed as a competitive handclap game. The group formed a circle and each person held the "pinky" (small finger) of the person standing next two them on each side. In unison, the group recited the introductory line "Wooble Wooble Wooble and ah 1 2 3" while swinging their arms back and forth in rhythm with each word. The words "Deep blue sea is chanted faster than "Wooble Wooble Wooble." The group then let go of their little fingers and in unison, begans chanting the rhyme.

At an acknowledged starting point in the circle, one person lightly slapped the hand of the person to her right as she and the group chanted one word of the song. With each word or syllable {such as "lit tle"}, the next person lightly slapped the person to her right. With no change in the tempo of the recitation, the person whose hand had been slapped then slaps the hand of the person on her right. The action continues around the circle. The person whose hand is slapped at the last word "Stop" is out.

When the number of players was down to two people, these two stood facing each other and took turns slapping each other's hand with each word. At some point in the recititation, one of the 'competitors' moved her hand away to soon, or otherwise missed her slap, and therefore was out. The object of the game is to be the last person in the game.

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ZING ZING ZING AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA (Version #3 of I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl)
Zing Zing Zing
at the bottom of the sea.
I am a little __ second grade
as pretty as can __ be be. ("___" indicates one beat before recitation begins again).
And all the boys around my house
go crazy over __ me me.

My boyfriend's name is __ Yellow.
He comes from Ala__bama
with 25 toes
and a pickle on his nose
and this is how the story goes.
One day I was ah __ walkin
I saw my boyfriend __ talking
to a very pretty girl
with cherry pie curls
And this is what she said
"I L-O-V-E __ love you."
"I K-I-S-S __ kiss you."
"I A-D-O-R-E __ adore you"
So S-T-O-P. STOP!
1-2-3-4
Get your black hands off of me!
- Diarra, K'azsa, and Michelle (African American girls), Fort Pitt Elementary School, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Septemperr 2004; collected by Azizi Powell, September 2004

The dashes indicate that you pause for a beat before saying the next word or the next syllable.

Editor: I collected this example while visiting my daughter’s after-school classroom in the
beginning of a new school year. Zing Zing Zing/at the bottom of the sea" is an introductory phrase similar to "Wooble Wooble Wooble/ and [in] the deep blue sea". "I Love Coffee, I Love Tea (Version #4) which is found on this page below begins with similar lines "Zing Zing Zing, and ah 1 2 3".

In this "Dutch Girl" rhyme, two of the girls started to sing “I’m a little first grade”, but changed to “second grade” because they remembered that they had moved up to that grade. After they had finished, I asked them which grade they usually use and was told that grade mentioned depending on the grade of the girls reciting this song. "First grade” and “second grade” probably mean “first grader” and “second grader”.

This rhyme was chanted as a three person handclap game. The three girls stood in a triangle formation and took turns clapping each other's hands and their own hands. I have also seen this same rhyme-without that last line-performed as a two partner handclap routine and as a group routine (more than four people). In this rendition, when they said “Get your black hands off of me”, the girls did a chest high, flicking motion with their right hand as if to say "get out of here.

At this same school, I have also heard this line given as "strawberry curls". However, because almost 100% of the students in the school are Black, and, because I don't believe that any White teacher in that school has red hair, the students may not have known that strawberry curls means "red hair". That said, the phrase "cherry pie curls" was probably almost as meaningless as "strawberry curls". But, at least these children had probably heard of-even if they may not have tasted-cherry pies.

"1 2 3 4" at the end of the rhyme was probably originally was "1-2-3" since "three" rhymes with "me". The "Get your black hands off of me!" line suggests that "black" skin color may still be viewed as a negative.

Note: In April 2010, I collected the same rhyme from two 9 year old African American girls Takeya and Alexus) who live in the same neighborhood as Fort Pitt Elementary School (now titled Fort Pitt Accelerated Learning Academy). When the rhyme called for the girls to give their grades, one girl chanted "I am a second grader" and the other girl chanted "I am a third grader". Both girls said the "get your black hands off of me" line.

I also heard the beginning of this same rhyme chanted by a third grade African American girl in the lunchroom of the same school in May 2010 when I was substitute teaching there. That girl said "I am a third grader"/as pretty as can be be be". Unfortunately, I wasn't able to hear the rest of the rhyme.

****
I'M A LITTLE SIX GRADER (Version #4 of I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl)
imma little six grader
as pretty as can be be
my boyfriend name is bow wow
he lives in ohio
and this is how my story goes
one day I was walking
I saw my boyfriend talking
to the ugliest girl
in the whole wide world
and this is how my story goes
k-i-s-s kiss you
l-o-v-e love you
m-i-s-s miss you
and this is how my story goes
a b c d
so keep yo hands away from me.
- http://www.home-school.com.au/resource/skipping-rope-jump-rope-hopscotch... 3/21/2005
*"bow bow" here is probably the young African American R&B singer.

****
I AM A PRETTY LITTLE DUTCH GIRL [as pretty as can be] Version #5
I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl (Pretty as pretty can be)...Longview Washington in the 1950s...23rd street, St. Rose School...

I am a pretty little Dutch girl
Pretty as pretty can be
And all the boys around my house
Are crazy over me me me

My boyfirend's name is Patty
He comes from Cincinatti
With 28 toes and a pickle in his nose
And that's the way my story goes

First he gave me peaches
And then he gave me pears
And then he gave me fifty cents
And kissed me on the stairs

My father he was .>>>>>>>>>>
My mother she was too
My sister was so jealous that
She didn't know what to do....
-Mary Garvey (Longview Washington); Folklore: Skipping Rhymes & Playground Games; March 07. 2007

Editor: “>>>” stands for words that are forgotten

****
MY BOYFRIEND'S NAME IS NICO (Version #6 of "I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl")
I grew up in NYC the 1970s and remember hearing this one:

My boyfriend's name is Nico
He comes from Puerto Rico
With four flat toes and a turned up nose
And that's the way my story goes
One day when I was walking
I heard my boyfriend talking
To a little girl with a strawberry curl
And this is what he said to her:
I K-I-S-S kiss you
I L-O-V-E love you
Then he fell in a lake and ate a snake
And ended up with a belly ache.
-kmoser ; 3/19/2008

****
I AM A PRETTY LITTLE DUTCH GIRL [as pretty as can be] (Version #7)
I am a pretty little Dutch girl
As pretty as I can be
And all the boys
In the neighborhood
Are crazy over me
My boyfriend’s name is Patty
He comes from the Cincinnati
With 48 toes
And a pickle for a nose
And this is how my story goes
One day as I was walking,
I saw my boyfriend talking
To a pretty little girl
with a strawberry curl
and this is what he said to her
I L-O-V-E, love you
I'll K-I-S-S, kiss you

Then I pushed him in a lake
And he swallowed a snake
And ended up with a tummy ache
Dad called the doctor
Mum called the nurse
Sister called the lady with the alligator purse

In came the doctor
In came the nurse
In came the lady with the alligator purse
"Measles", said the doctor
"Chicken-pox", said the nurse
"Smallpox", said the lady with the alligator purse
Out went the doctor
Out went the nurse
Out went the lady with the alligator purse
-multiple sources including http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pretty_Little_Dutch_Girl; assessed 5/23/2010

Editor:
The Wikipedia page for "I'm A Pretty Little Dutch Girl" indicates that "The earliest record found so far is for New York around 1940. It seems to have spread over the USA by the 1950s and reached Britain in 1959, where it was taken up very quickly across the country to become one of the most popular skipping rhymes among girls"...

The editors of that Wikipedia page indicated the lyrics they presented were "common versions". However, I think that only the first verse of the example given above is most often chanted for that rhyme. The other two verses appear to be familiar versions of the "Miss Lucy Had A Baby" rhyme. Examples of that rhyme are found on this page.

****
SEA SEA SEA (Version #8 of I'm A Pretty Little Dutch Girl)
Sea Sea Sea To the bottom of the sea Hey! Hey!
I'ma little FRESH GIRL as pretty as can BE BE
all the guys in the nieghborhood just wanna get with ME ME
my daddys name is JUMBO he lives in alaBAMA
whatca gonna cal him DADDY
whatcha gonna feed him CANDY
my mommy told me if i was goode then he would buy me a rubber dolle my auntie told her i kissed a souldier she didnt buy me that rubber dolle
3 6 9 ur momma aint fine she looks liek a monkey form a telephone line
BACK IT UP 2 3 4
RAISE THE ROOF 2 3 4
FREEZE!(U freaze) thanks!
-Alexandria; http://hubpages.com/hub/Recess-is-BACK-Hand-Clapping-Games ; 2009; assessed August 29, 2010

Editor: Examples of "My Mother Told Me" are found on this page.

****
SEA SEA SEA (Version #9 of I'm A Pretty Little Dutch Girl)
I have another version of Sea:

Sea sea sea at the bottom of the sea!
I am a little __ 3rd grader
As cute as can__ be
My boyfriend's name is ___ Jell-o
He comes from Ala__bama
With a booger from his nose
All the way to his toes
And this is how my story goes!
One day when I was __ walking
I heard my boyfriend __ talking
To the prettiest girl
With strawberry curls
And this is what he said:
I L-O-V-E Love you!
I K-I-S-S Kiss you!
S-T-O-P STOP! Don't move!
-Becky; http://hubpages.com/hub/Recess-is-BACK-Hand-Clapping-Games ; 2009; retrieved August 29, 2010

****
I'M A PRETTY FIRST GRADER (Version #10 of I Am A Pretty Little Dutch Girl)
I am a pretty __ first grader*
As pretty as can___ be be.
My boyfriend's name is__ Chris Brown**
He lives in Ala__bama.
One day when I was___walking
I saw my boyfriend __ talking
To the ugliest girl in the whole wide world.
And this is what he said.
I K-I-S-S
I M-I-S-S miss you.
I L-O-V-E love you.
ABCDEFG
Get your black hands off of me.***
I K-I-S-S Kiss you!
-Naijah S.; (African American female, 9 years old; Hazelwood section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; January 14, 2011; Collected by Azizi Powell 1/14/2011

The dashes indicate one beat before the next word or the next syllable.

Editor: Naijah recited this rhyme without my asking for it by name. She said "Girls say the grade they are in when they say this rhyme (like first grade or second grade or fifth grade). Naijah also said that when she was in the second grade she forgot and said "I am a pretty first grader".

**"Chris Brown" is a currently popular young African American R&B singer and actor. besides his popularity, his last name "Brown" is the reason why he joins a long line in children's playground rhymes of other people or characters whose last name is "Brown"-for instance "Buster Brown", "Charlie Brown", "James Brown", and probably others.

***Naijah said "The reason why she said that ["Get your black hands off of me] is that she was mad at him because he was cheating on her". See my comment and Naijah's comment about "Get your black hand off of me" line in the editor's comments for "ET".

****
I AM A PRETTY LITTLE DUTCH GIRL [as pretty as can be] (Version #11)
Here is a street song the Jewish girls on my block in East Flatbush, Brooklyn, sang while playing a hand-clapping game:

I am a pretty little Dutch girl, as pretty as pretty can be,
and all the boys around my block are crazy over me.
My boy friend's name is Paddy, he comes from Cincinnati,
with a freckle on his nose and two black toes and this is how my story goes....
MerlePsyA; 8/24/2011

****
I CAN DO THE TURN AROUND (Jump Rope)
From late 1940s - early 1960s; Manchester UK

Girls were active participants in skipping, boys merely sometime interested observers - the following skipping rhyme gives a clue. Each line was accompanied by appropriate actions:

I can do the turn around
I can do the splits
I can do the crouch down
Picking up sticks
I can do the hootchy-cootch
Sister showed me how
The girls show their knickers
And the boys say, "Wow!"

A flash of female knickers [underpants] was a BIG DEAL in those [slightly] more innocent times!
-Meic; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2998&messages=112 ; Naughty kids' greatest hits II; 3/30/2007

Editor:
In England & other parts of the United Kingdom (UK), and elsewhere, "jumping rope" is known as "skipping".

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO SCHOOL
Shame shame shame
I don't wanna go to school no more more more
There's a big fat teacher by the door door door
If she grabs you by the collar
Lord you better holler
I don't want to go to school no more more more

I've also heard a version of this where it was Mexico and a policeman
-Pogo; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350 "I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes":
5/22/2005

Editor:
"I Don't Want To Go To School" is a member of the "I Don't Want To Go To Macy's No More" /"I Don't Want To Go To Mexico No More" rhyme family.

****
I DON'T WANNA GO TO MEXICO NO MORE (Example #1)
Shame Shame Shame.
I don't want to go to Mexico
no more, more, more.
There's a big fat policeman
at door, door, door.
If he pulls you by the collar
girl, you better holler.
I don't want to go to Mexico
no more, more, more.
Shame.
-African American girls & boys, ages 5-12; (Pittsburgh, PA)
collected in 1998 by Azizi Powell, posted on Cocojams 5/12/2004

Editor:
"I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" was originally named "I Don't Want To Go To Macys". "Macys" was the name of a big department store in New York City, and other cities. Because children weren't familiar with that store name, the word "Macys" was (probably accidentally) changed to "Mexico", and the change stuck. Incidentally, I've never seen any contemporary (post 1980s) examples of this rhyme with the "Macys" name. But I have read examples of this rhyme with the first line "I don't want to go to school", and "I don't want to go outside". See below on this page for an example with the first line "I don't want to go to Hollywood".

Many of these rhymes start with the phrase "Shame Shame Shame". Because I consider "Shame Shame Shame" to be an introductory phrase, I've placed these rhyme under "I" since I think that's the beginning of the actual rhyme.

I collected this version in 1998 from a number of school aged African American girls and boys living in various Pittsburgh, PA. neighborhoods.

"I Don't Want To Go To Macy's" (and similarly worded titles that include the word "Macy's") is probably the source for "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" and other related children's rhymes. Roger Abraham notes in his collection Jump-Rope Dictionary that "I Don't Want To Go To Macy's" was documented as being performed by American children in 1938. "Macy's is the name of a chain of department stores. The most famous Macy's store is located in New York City. My theory is that these children substituted "Mexico" for "Macys" since they weren't familiar with the "Macy's" store or the word "Macy's". This is an example of "folk etymology." Folk etymology occurs when people change foreign words or unfamiliar words into familiar words or sounds that are similar to the word they don't know.

Here's a video with the same words:

Shame Shame Shame (hand game)

Uploaded by jerving on Jul 29, 2010

Here Irene and her Dad demonstrate how to do the hand game (simple version) known as "Shame Shame Shame" or "I Don't Want to Go to Mexico." The written directions for this appear in the print edition of the August/September 2010 IRENE magazine (online at http:\\irenemagazine.wordpress.com).

-snip-

The hand placement shown in this video is the same as that which I have observed used by African American girls for this rhyme. (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania late 1990s to 2007, when I stopped most of my direct collection of playground rhymes).

****
I DON'T WANNA GO TO MEXICO NO MORE (Example #2)
Shame Shame Shame.
I don't want to go to Mexico
no more, more, more.
There's a big fat policeman
at door, door, door.
He'll grab you by the collar
and make you pay a dollar.
I don't want to go to Mexico
no more, more, more.
Shut the door!
-Bree'ana W. & Tonoya W. (Philadelphia, PA);
collected in 2001 by Azizi Powell, posted on Cocojams 5/12/2004

Editor:
I asked several of my young cousins at a family reunion if they knew any handclapping songs. They performed this one as a partner handclap (two people stand still, facing each other and alternately clap or slap one or two of the other person's hands). Each partner tries to be the first to say "shut the door!" Whoever says it first, lightly flicks the other player on the side of their forehead and then points to them in a "Got ya!" manner. Each girl leans back to try to not get flicked or tapped on the forehead. It's possible for both of them to get flicked or tapped at the same time. But no one is supposed to get angry about this. This is just one of several rhymes that I have collected that involve children getting flicked, tapped, hit, or pushed during a rhyme or at the end of a rhyme.

"Shame Shame Shame" is a common introductory phrase for children's rhymes from African American traditions. Although this phrase may have originally meant "You should be ashamed" (of the words that follow that phrase), I think that "Shame Shame Shame" is chanted now just as a formulaic phrase. Some rhymes that begin with this phrase also end with the word "Shame" instead of the phrase "Shut the door". That word is usually a signal to try to flick or hit or push your partner before she touches you.

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO (Example #3)
I don't want to go to mexico no more more more.
there's a big fat person's name ______ at the door door door. if you
pull em by the coller man she/he is gonna holler! i don't wanna go to mexico no more more more.
-grhzsr; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350 "I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes"; 11/25/2008

Here's an example of how some children do the handclap rhyme "I Don"t Want To Go To Mexico" Note that in where I live Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and also in its surrounding communities, African American children say that they do hand claps. They don't say that they "play" or "perform" hand claps.

I dont wanna go to Mexico no mo mo m o

Posted by PencilComput
March 28, 2007

"New Orleans students doin they rhyme thang".

**
Editor: Notice the slightly different way these two adults do hand movements to this same rhyme:

I Don't Wanna Go to Mexico No More.

PakPrincess92
February 16, 2009

"My friends Alex and Michael showing their amazing skills at old nursery rhymes. "

-end of quote-

Editor: For the record, the title of this video is mistaken. "I Don't Want To Go To Mexico" is a children's recreational rhyme and not a nusery rhyme.

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO (Example #4)
Heres another one I use to sing as a little girl.
I dont wanna go to mexico no more more more
theres a big fat policemen at the door door door
if you pull him by the collar ooo you better hollar
if you pull him by the pants ooo you better dance
I dont wanna go to mexico no more more more
SHUT THE DOOR!

(while your singing you do a hand slapping type thing and when you sing shut the door you try to clap your hands aroung the others, whoever claps the others hand in theirs wins.
- Catherine; http://blogs.herald.com/dave_barrys_blog/2005/05/a_readers_plea/comments... ; November 21, 2009

Editor:
I think that Catherine's mention of "the others" instead of "your partner" implies that this rhyme was performed by three clappers [standing or sitting in a triangle formation] or four clappers standing or sitting in a square [two sets of partners doing the routine together]. I've seen this hand clap rhyme and others performed this way, but almost always by girls (or much less often, boys) standing and not sitting.

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO HOLLYWOOD (Example #5 of I Don't Want To Go To Mexico)
shame shame shame,
i don’t wanna go to hollywood no more more more,
theres a fat michale jackson
at the door door door,
he grabbed me by the hips,
kissed me on the lips,
i don’t wanna go to hollywood no more more more
- Shasta; http://losemyway.wordpress.com/2008/02/06/hand-clapping-games/ No More 3x5's Hand Clapping Games; August 12, 2010

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO (Example #6)
I don't want to go to Mexico
No more, more, more.
There's a big fat policeman
At door, door, door.
He'll grab you by the collar
and make you pay a dollar.
I don't want to go to Mexico
no more, more, more.
Shut the door! *
-Naijah (African American girl, 9 year old; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, February 2011)

Editor:
Naijah shared this rhyme with me without me asking for it by name. She said 'When you say "Shut the door" you hit the person on the forehead".

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO (Example #7)
I don't wanna go to Mexico no more, more, more,
there's a big fat policeman at my door, door, door.
He took me by the hips, kissed me on the lips,
I don't wanna go to Mexico no more, more, more.

I WANNA go to Mexico some more, more, more,
there's a real cute guy at the door, door, door.
He grabbed me by the hips, kissed me on the lips,
I WANNA go to Mexico some more, more, more!"
-Guest, blondiegal397; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055 Folklore: Play Ground Hand Jives; March 21. 2011

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO HOLLYWOOD (Example #8)
I Don’t Want to go to Hollywood
no more more more
There’s two cute boys by the door door door
They’ll grab you by the hips
And kiss you on the lips
I don’t want to go to Hollywood no more more more
- Dora, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0WUdFTi2K1k [3rd rhyme recited], May 18, 2013

****
I DON'T WANT TO GO TO MEXICO (Example #9)
"I don't wanna go to Mexico also has a poor message about law enforcement and I guess Mexicans as well.

"I don't wanna go to Mexico
No more more more
There's a big fat police man
At the door door door
When I opened the door
He peed on the floor
I don't wanna go to Mexico no more more more"
-A Quinn, Bloomfield, CT, December 20, 2014
-snip-
The word "also" here refers to A. Quinn's comments about the rhyme "Down Down Baby", posted above as Example #34.

The "opened the door/peed on the floor" lines have their source in the folk song entitled "Old Shoe Boots And Leggings". Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/09/the-old-black-booger-folk-song.html for a pancocojams post about a version of that song.

****
I LIKE (LOVE) COFFEE . I LIKE (LOVE) TEA
"I Like Coffee I Like Tea" is a large family of playground rhymes which has been documented as a jump rope rhyme as early as 1869. Like most other children's rhymes, "I Like Coffee I Like Tea is made up of a number of independent or semi-independent (stand alone) verses. The title for these rhymes is also commonly given as "I Love Coffee I Love Tea". (For the convenience sake, in this comment, I will sometimes use "ILC" or "I Like Coffee" in place of the full title of that rhyme or verse.)

"ILC" is often found in "Down Down Baby" rhymes. "Down Down Baby" is also known as "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pop" or similarly sounding titles. "I Like Coffee" verses are also found in several other rhymes, particularly versions of "Last Night, The Night Before", "Not Last Night But The Night Before", "Apple On A Stick", "Take A Peach, Take A Plum, and "Eeny Meenie Epsideenie".

Since the 1970s, "I Like Coffee" rhymes appear to usually be performed in the United States by girls playing handclap games. Previously, that playground rhyme appeared to be most often performed by girls jumping rope.

Since at least the late 1980s, or early 1990s, racial references and confrontational lines (lines about fighting) have become a part of some versions of the "Down Down Baby" / "I Love Coffee I Love Tea" rhymes. I'm not sure why that is. However it's my guess is that these these lines reflect the racial tensions between school children that often occurs with the increased school integration. This pancocojams post focuses on that pattern: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/01/racialized-versions-of-i-like-co... Racialized Versions of "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" Rhymes.

****
I LIKE COFFEE I LIKE TEA (Version #1; Jump Rope Rhyme)
29 June 1869, Port Jervis (NY) Evening Gazette, pg. 2, col. 3:
The following amatory epistle from a little eight-year-old girl to her “bow” was picked up in one of the schools of Oswego, a few days ago. (...) I love coffee I love tea I love you if you love me.

posted in http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/i_love_coffee_i_...

Editor:
A number of other early examples of "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" can be found on the webpage given above. I also learned of the example given as #2 below on that page.

****
I LIKE COFFEE AND I LIKE TEA (Version #2; Jump Rope Rhyme)
July 1888, The American Anthropologist, “Games of Washington Children” by W. H. Babcock (also in Lippincott’s Magazine, March and September 1886), pg. 251:

I like coffee and I like tea;
I like boys and the boys like me.
I’ll tell my mother when I get home
The boys wont let the girls alone.
O sweet beans and barley grows,
O sweet beans and barley grows,
Nor you nor I nor nobody knows
How O sweet beans and barley grows.

http://books.google.com/books?id=3SwCAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA251&dq=i-like-tea+%22...

****
SOME LIKES COFFEE SOME LIKES TEA (from "Such A Getting Upstairs"; Version #3)
Some likes coffee, some likes tea
Some likes a pretty girl, just like me
Such a getting upstairs and a playing on the fiddle
Such a getting upstairs I never did see

portion of [United Kingdom] Morris dance as quoted in http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37741&messages=14 Such a Getting Upstairs by pavane August 14, 2001]

Editor:
The blogger pavane mentioned that the [United Kingdom] Morris dance song "Getting Upstairs," was collected by Cecil Sharp and published in 1909. I'm not sure if Sharp collected the tune or also the words given above.

The song "Such A Getting Upstairs" is a minstrel song from the United States. Whether that song was "lifted" from a Black plantation song or not is an open question. Many "black faced" minstrel songs intermingled with Black plantation songs & vice versa. It's very difficult to know which came first. Be that as it may, it is known that in the 19th century White "black faced" minstrels and later, Black "black faced" minstrels extensively performed in Great Britain, Australia, and South Africa. Those tours greatly influenced folk songs & dances and other customs in those nations.

Here's a video of that dance (without any singing, but with an exchange of hand claps)

Getting Upstairs - Hinton-in-the-Hedges

Note that this video line is from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sich_a_Getting_up_Stairs
That link was posted along with this comment: "Video of Morris dancers; clapping, when they are clapping tune is very much like the tune of the hand clapping game; nick nack paddy wack"

Also Click http://web.mac.com/geoff.bowen14/ydw/MORNOTES.htm for general information about Morris Dancing. Here's an excerpt from that page:

"Hand and arm Movements
Very many of the dances involve hand movements, usually with handkerchiefs being waved, flourished or swung up and down in particular patterns depending on the particular village tradition. A small number of dances use hand clapping.

In some Cotswold Morris dances the dancers use sticks to hit out a rhythm on their partner’s stick and also on the ground."

****
I LOVES COFFEE AN' I LOVES TEA (Version #4)
Some loves coffee, some loves tea,
Some loves money, but they don't love me.
Singing in the lonesome cowboyee,
Singing in the lonesome sea.

sung by Mrs. Laurel Jones at Brurnsville, N.C., Sept. 17, 1918 quoted in recorded in Cecil J. Sharp's English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians (1932; 1966), no. 272 (the last song of the volume)

The same version is also in Cecil J. Sharp's Nursery Songs from the Appalachian Mountains [1st series] (Novello, n.d.) with piano accompaniment, with copyright year 1921. The title given by both books is "Some Love Coffee" (with grammatical agreement corrected). The nursery song book version has the "Some love coffee" line; the rest is the same

Source: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37741&messages=18 Lyr Req: Such a Getting Upstairs; posted by masato sakurai on August 18, 2001

****
I LOVES COFFEE AN' I LOVES TEA (Version #5)
I loves coffee, an' I loves tea.
I axes you, Vinie, does you love me?

Source: Portion of the song "Vinie" that is included in Thomas W. Talley's now classic book Negro Folk Songs, Wise And Otherwise

http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/negro-folk-rhymes/negro-folk-rhymes%20...
song # 130 [page 0230] in Charles K. Wolfe ‘s 1991 revised edition of Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise & Otherwise (originally published by Macmillan Company in 1922)

Editor:
Note that "Vinie" is a female's name or nickname.

"Java Jive" ("I Love Coffee I Love Tea") was first recorded as a "pop" song in 1940 by the Inkspots (a popular African American singing group). That song has since been recorded by numerous vocal groups. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iP6IUqrFHjw
Uploaded by RReady555 on Jul 12, 2008 [with song’s full lyrics]

****
SOME LIKES COFFEE SOME LIKES TEA (from "Such A Getting Upstairs"; Version #6)
Some love coffee, some love tea, But I love the pretty girl that winks at me."

…“ Such a Getting Upstairs" [described] as a going-up-to-bed song from Indiana is in Ruth Crawford Seeger's American Folk Songs for Children (Doubleday, 1948, p.53) with music. In her notes, Ruth says: "It is the refrain of a play-party tune whose second section can be whistled or hummed or played, or sung with varying words like the [these words] from Virginia:

Source: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37741&messages=18 Lyr Req: Such a Getting Upstairs; posted by masato sakurai on August 15, 2001

****
I LOVE COFFEE. I LOVE TEA (Jump Rope Rhyme, Version #6)
I love coffee
I love tea
I love the boys and they love me
-multiple sources, including from my childhood in the 1950s in Atlantic City, New Jersey

****
I LOVE COFFEE. I LOVE TEA (Jump Rope Rhyme, Version #7)
I love coffee
I love tea
I want [insert another girl or boy's name]
to come jump with me.
-multiple sources, from around 1950s-1980s?

****
I LIKE COFFEE. I LIKE TEA (Version #8)
Zing, Zing, Zing,
and ah 1-2-3.
I like coffee, I like tea.
I like a black boy and he likes me.
So step back, white boy, you don't shine.
I'll get the black boy to beat your behind.

Last night and the night before.
I met my boyfriend at the candy store.
He bought me ice cream he bought me cake.
He brought me home with a belly ache.

Mama, mama, I feel sick
Call the doctor, quick, quick, quick
Doctor, doctor, will I die?
Close your eyes and count to five
1-2-3-4-5
I'm Alive!

See that house up on the hill.
That's where me and my baby live.
Eat a piece of meat
Eat a piece of bread.
Come on baby. let's go to bed
-Kayla. (African American female, age 5; recited for Alafia Children's Ensemble, Fort Pitt Elementary School chapter, (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), 2000; collected by Azizi Powell, 2000; posted on Cocojams, 2003

Editor:
This example of "I Like Coffee. I Like Tea" was collected during the "Show & Tell" segment of the after-school game song group, Alafia Children's Ensemble that I started and coordinated from 1997-2007. In these portion of the group, children were invited to share rhymes and game songs that they knew. A girl or boy could share these examples along, or with one or more other members of the group. It was customary for children to "sing" along if they knew the "song" that the child or children presented.

The rest of the group enthusiastically recited the words to "I Like Coffee I Like Tea with 5 year old Kayla. The girl ended her show & tell turn with the words "I'm Alive" and then started to go back to her seat. However, she stopped and continued saying the rest of the rhyme. It appeared as though the rest of the group didn't know the words to that part of the rhyme because they didn't say those words along with her as they had previously done. Furthermore, many children in the group started sniggering when Kayla chanted the lines "Come on baby, let's go to bed. Kayla looked around in confusion. It seemed clear that she didn't understand why the other members of the group were laughing. I thanked Kayla and said some innocuous grown-up thing like "They were married", and quickly moved on to the next child who wanted to share a rhyme with the rest of group.

Before Kayla left the group session that day, I privately asked her where she learned that rhyme. She said her mother had taught it to her. Interestingly enough, in the ten years that I conducted once a week after-school game song groups or special event (one time) game song sessions throughout many African American neighborhoods of Pittsburgh and some other surrounding communities, only one other child recited that entire verse. Coincidentally, that child was also a five year old girl who said she learned it from her mother.

For the record, the two neighborhoods where these girls lived were very distant from each other (Garfield & Northview Heights). As was the case in first time this entire rhyme was recited, the other group members who were older had recited the rest of the rhyme along with the girl who volunteered to share it, but appeared not to know the last, somewhat risque', verse.

Also, note that the performance activity for this rhyme had changed from jump rope to hand clapping. A number of hand clap rhymes were originally jump rope rhymes.

****
I LIKE COFFEE. I LIKE TEA (Version #9)
Does anyone remeber the one that has
I like coffee i like tea
i like a black boy and he likes me
so stand back white boys
i know your shy
I'll get a black boy to beat your behind
he'll beat it rough
he'll be it tough
he'll beat it till you almost had enough.
-Guest, Kerry; "Children's Street Songs", http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300; 8/26/2005

****
I LOVE COFFEE. I LOVE TEA (Example #10)
I love coffee
I love tea
I love a Black boy and he loves me
so step back White boy
you don't shine
I'mma get a Black boy to beat your behind

I met my boyfriend at the candy store.
He bought me ice-cream, he bought me cake,
he brought me home with a belly-ache.
Mamma, Mamma, I feel sick.
Call the doctor - quick, quick, quick.
Doctor, Doctor, will I die?
Count to five and you'll be alive.
1-2-3-4-5. I'm alive.
-African American girls (ages 6-12 years) in various neighborhoods the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area; collected by Azizi Powell, 1980s-2006; posted on 2/26/2006

Editor:
This version iappears to be widely recited among African American girls in the Pittsburgh, Penn area from about the late 1980s-early 1990s to date (2011). I've found the same or similar contemporary versions of this rhyme on various Internet sites for contemporary children's rhymes. I've also received the same version of this rhyme from persons in New York City, Georgia, Michigan, Conneticut, and Maryland. This leads me to believe that this version can probably be found throughout the United States, if not elsewhere.

Some examples of the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania rhyme that I've collected have this rhyming line at the end: "1-2-3-4-5. I'm alive." Less often, I've heard children say at the end "I'm Alive. And on channel 5".

[The "5" was added because it rhymed with the word "alive". I'm not sure that there is a channel 5 station in that city.]

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TAKE A PEACH TAKE A PLUM (I Like Coffee, I Like Tea (Example #11)
take a peach take a plum take a stick of bubblegum
no peach no plum just a stick of bubblegum
I like coffee and i like tea
I like a colored boy and he likes me
So step back whiteboy you don't shine
I get my colored boy to beat ya behind
He beat ya high
he beat ya low
he beat you all the way to Mexico
I saw you with ya boyfriend last night
How Do I know
I peeked out the window
Nosey!
I ate a bunch of candy
greedy!
I didn't take a shower
Dirty!
I didn't do my homework
Stupid!

*i forgot the rest*
- GeminiChix, Octoblog ; February 28, 2006 [The Octoblog website is no longer accessible]

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I LOVE COFFEE. I LOVE TEA (Version #12)
I grew up for part of my early years in the remote Ozarks area of North Arkansas where there were no African Americans. Yet in the 1950's and early 1960's a variation of that "I like coffee, I like tea" song was a common jump rope ditty in our area that went like this:

"I went down to Granpa's farm,
Billy goat chased me 'round the barn.
Chased me up an apple tree;
This is what he said to me:

I like coffee, I like tea,
I like pretty girls, they like me.
Hurry! Hurry! Kiss me quick,
Here comes Granny with a stick!"
(clap!) (Clap!)

This ditty ended with two loud hand claps. It was sung to that tune about "Down at Papa Joe's" . . . I don't know the name that song, but as kids we could always start with a black Eb key on a piano and easily pick it out using mostly the black keys.
-EuGene; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102055 ; Folklore: Play Ground Hand Jives; June 30, 2007

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I LIKE COFFEE. I LIKE TEA (Example #13)
i like coffee
i like tea
i like the other boy and he likes me
so step back white boy
you dont shine
i'll get the other boy to beat ya behind
last night
the night before
i met my boyfriend at the candy store
he bought me icecream
he bought me cake
he brought me home with a stomach ache
i said "momma, momma, i feel sick"
"call the doctor...quick quick quick"
"doctor, doctor. will i die"
he said "count to five and you'll be alright"
i said "1, 2, 3 ,4 ,5... i'm alive!"
-cryss; http://roughdraft.typepad.com/dotmoms/2004/05/theres_a_song_i/comments/p... ; November 23, 2007

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I LIKE COFFEE. I LIKE TEA (Example #14)
I was taught this version of -I like coffee, I like tea- when I worked at a summer camp in Inkster, MI (suburb of Detroit) in 2002:

I like coffee I like tea
I like the colored boy an' he likes me
so step back white boy
you ain't fly
i'll get the colored boy to beat your behind
last night the night before
i met my boyfriend at the candy store
he bought me ice cream
he bought me cake
he brought me home
with a belly ache
momma, momma will i die
close your eyes and count to 5
1-2-3-4-5 i'm alive
-Emily (Inkster, Michigan); December 26, 2007

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I LIKE COFFEE I LIKE TEA (Example #15; Jump Rope Rhyme [Skipping rhyme]
Hi, one skipping rhyme I remember, and now I cant think why. Today it would be very politically incorrect and something else besides, I'm not sure I should repeat it but here goes.
" I lke coffee I like tea
I like sitting on a Bl..k Mans knee" I don't remember any more.
-mariep; (Bordesley Green Rd/now Corfu; Great Britain); http://forum.birminghamhistory.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1047 November 24th, 2008

Editor: The word "Bl..k" = "Black".
There are a number of examples of "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" which end with the line "I like sitting on a black man's knee". All of those examples appear to come from the UK.

I believe that that lines were composed by White children to make the rhyme risqueAfter all, it wouldn't be risque for Black children to sit on a Black man's knee.

* See the example from http://odps.org/glossword/index.php?a=srch&d=3&id_srch=6cf49047eb45a26ad... Seedy Songs and Rotten Rhymes - the poetry of the playground that includes this line and ends this way:
"With a one and a two and a three (on three lift your skirt, turn tround quickly, bend over and show your bum)"

Also, note that the "sitting on a Black man's lap has nothing to do with child sexual molestation.

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I LIKE COFFEE I LIKE TEA (Version #16)
I went to elementary school starting in 1980, in Bloomfield, Connecticut (adjacent to Hartford). The girls (including my sister) did clapping games on the bus everyday it seemed, and when they hung out in the street, etc. Demographic note: my family is White; Blacks (including many Jamaicans) are a majority in the town, and were most of our playmates.

The version to this one went:
"I like coffee, I like tea
I like a Black/White boy an' he likes me
So step back White/Black boy, you don't shine
I'll get a Black/White boy to beat your behind."

The girls would switch the race of the boy, depending on who was singing. Sometimes there'd be confusion if a White and a Black girl were playing together, and they'd sort of get jumbled up on that word and try to push their version. Sometimes they would agree on a skin tone based on a previous conversion about who the girl whose "turn" it was actually "likes." The reason why I remember distinctly that they did it both ways was that as a little kid I tried to imagine what "you don't shine" meant. I'd try to reason what skin tone "shined" more! Needless to say, I never figured it out!
-Gibb (Bloomfield, Connecticut) Not Last Night But The Night Before-rhyme; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=115045&messages=66; 3/5/2009

Editor:
I was very interested to learn that "The girls would switch the race of the boy, depending on who was singing.". I found one example online in which the girl recited "step back white girl/you don't shine/ I'm gonna get a black girl to beat your behind". Unfortunately, I wasn't given permission to repost that example. However, Gibs comments are the first time that I've read that that children might say "step back Black boy/I'mma get a White boy to beat your behind. I think that's interesting and significant.

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I LIKE COFFEE I LIKE TEA (Version #17)
I like coffee
I like tea
i like the colored boy and he likes me
so stand back white boy you dont shine
I'll get the colored boy to beat your behind
- Guest, Mani; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653 Down Down Baby-Race in Children's Rhymes; May 12, 2010

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I MET MY BOYFRIEND AT THE CANDY STORE (Version #1)
Uno, dos, siesta *
I said a-east, a-west
I met my boyfriend at the candy store
He bought me ice cream, he bought me cake
He brought me home with a belly ache
Mama mama, I'm so sick
Call the doctor quick quick quick
Doctor, doctor will I die?
Count to five and you'll be alive
I said, a-one, a-two, a-three, a-four, a-five
I'm alive!
- Kyle Bryant & Dana Bryant ; (performing hand clap game on Season 1, Episode 22 of The Cosby Show; 1984; The Slumber Party, transcription from http://www.tv.com/the-cosby-show/slumber-party/episode/6816/summary.html

* This phrase is probably a folk etymology form of "uno dos tres" (Spanish for "one, two, three". "Siesta" is a Spanish word that means "nap" in English).

Click this link for a post about this rhyme on my pancocojams cultural blog: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/01/bill-cosby-show-hand-clap-segmen...

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I MET MY BOYFRIEND AT THE CANDY STORE (Version #2)
remember this...

uno deuce tres
i say east-west
i met my boyfriend at the candy store
he brought me ice cream
he brought me cake
he brought me home with a belly ache
mama mama i feel sick
call the doctor
quick quick quick
doctor doctor
will i die
close your and eyes and count to five
1
2
3
4
5
i'm alive!
-MaMaBuddha (Harlem); 7/31/2000, http://www.greekchat.com/gcforums/archive/index.php/t-5627.html ; "Remember When"

Editor:
See the "I Like Coffee, I Like Tea rhymes" that are posted above for very similar rhymes.

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I MET MY BOYFRIEND AT THE CANDY STORE (Version #3) (Jump Rope Rhyme)
Growing up in the ghetto I used jump rope with the girls sometimes. We would sing this one a lot, but I would replace girlfriend for boyfriend:

"Uno, dos, siesta
I said a-east, a-west
I met my boyfriend at the candy store
He bought me ice cream, he bought me cake
He brought me home with a belly ache
Mama mama, I’m so sick
Call the doctor quick quick quick
Doctor, doctor will I die?
Count to five and you’ll be alright
I said, a-one, a-two, a-three, a-four, a-five
I’m alive!
-Jayride; (male); http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/389058 Which playground rhyme do you remember most? ; February 8, 2008

Editor: Trisha, posted this comment about this rhyme on March 16, 2008: "i remember that one. they sang it on one of the cosby show episodes too."

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I MET MY BOYFRIEND AT THE CANDY STORE (Version #4)
I said a east, a west,
I met my boyfriend at the candy store
he bought me ice cream,
he bought me cake,
he bought me home with a belly ache,
mama mama I feel sick,
call the doctor quick quick quick,
doctor doctor when I die
just close your eyes and count to 5
I said a 1 a 2 a 3 a 4 a 5
I'm alive,
6,7,8,9,10
I'm dead again.
-Guest, KLC (East Harlem, New York City, New York); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 ; Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes? ; July 11. 2008
-snip-
Editor:
"I said a east a west" serves as an introductory phrase in this rhyme. Usually the hand movements for the introductory phrase is different than it is for the actual rhyme.

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I MET MY BOYFRIEND AT THE CANDY STORE (Version #5)
(count to two in spanish) i met my boyfriend at the candy store
he bought me ice cream he bought me cake
he took me home with a belly ache
i said momma,momma im so sick
call the doctor quick,quick
doctor doctor will i die
he said close your eye's and count to five
1...2...3...4..5...
im alive on channel five
see that house on top of that hill
thats where me and my boyfriend live
cookin that chicken cookin that rice
come on baby lets shoot some dice
-arlisa c.; 11/12/ 2009
-snip-
"Uno, dos" is how you count to two in Spanish. Those words serve as the introduction to the actual rhyme. My observations of girls performing this rhyme was that they did a back and forth swaying motion while saying these lines and then switched to an alternating handclap routine for the actual rhyme. Notice these movements in The Cosby Show video of Version #1 of this rhyme.

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INKY PINKY PONKY
Inky Pinky Ponky, daddy bought a donkey, donkey died, daddy cried, inky pinky ponky. We didn't play elastic though, we used that one for skipping or clapping games
-JennieG; Elastics; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932 ; April 25, 2002

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IN OUT STEP ON IT
Hey, I'm Asian and yes, I did play Chinese jumprope (called Chinese garter, since that was what we used instead of rubber bands) in my grade school years... I remember pestering my mom for shoes without buckles so I could get past the tricky bits...
Chinese jumprope - in, out, step on, in out, twist, out, twist, out, diamond, out, diamond, out.
- Guest cleod; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35850&messages=53 ; Chinese Jump Rope ; June 27, 2001

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INSIDE OUTSIDE (Elastics/ Chinese Jump Rope) Version #1
we always played that as kids, and would say...
inside, outside, side by side, on it, off it, chizzle
-Guest Sara; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35850&messages=53 ; Chinese Jump Rope ; December 23; 2003

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INSIDE OUTSIDE (Elastics/ Chinese Jump Rope) Version #2
I remember one that my sister and I used to do:
in, out, side by side, in, out, on
Hope this helps!
-Guest Chrissy ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=35850&messages=53 ; Chinese Jump Rope ; April 12, 2004

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IN THE LAND OF FRANCE
In the land of France
Where the elephants all dance
One wouldn't dance
so they kicked him in the pants.
The pants he wore
cost a dollar eighty four.
-Guest; 3/31/2008 ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932 ; Child's Game: Elastics

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IN THE PLACE ON MARS
Selected examples of this rhyme are posted under "There's A Place On Mars" regardless of their title.

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I PLEDGE ALLlANGE TO THE FLAG (Version #1)
I was reading along with my kids and laughing at ones I remember from when I was little... I particularly liked the one with Michael Jackson in it - it also asked if there were different versions we could share... I lived in Hawaii in 1984 when the "commercial accident" occurred and this was the version I learned: I pledge allegiance to the flag Michael Jackson makes me gag Pepsi-Cola burned him up And now he's drinking 7-Up!
-Rhonda; 6/28/2007

Editor:
"I Pledge Allegiance To The Flag" is often recited as a section of many "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky" rhymes. As you mentioned, the examples that refer to pop singer Michael Jackson allude to the accident that occurred when his head got burned while he was filming a Pepsi Cola commercial. (See examples of those rhymes above).

I'm curious if there are any examples of "I Pledge Allegiance To The Flag" that don't mention Michael Jackson or this incident. If anyone knows any examples like that, please send them in so they can be shared with Cocojams readers!

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I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG (Version #2)
i pledge alegence to the flag michael jackson is a fag coca-cola beat him up doctor pepper fix him up now you're drinking 7-up we use to say this in grade school in the 90's
-Samantha; 3/15/2008

Editor:
Samantha, thanks for sending in this rhyme. I would like to say, however, that I'm very much against people calling anyone a "fag".

My comment should definitely not be interpreted to mean that I think that Michael Jackson was homosexual.

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SOFT DRINKS (Version #3 of I Pledge Allegiance To The Flag)
I pledge allegiance to the flag
My cleaning lady used a rag
Coca cola got blown up
Now we're drinking 7up
7up got the flu
now we're drinking mountain dew
mountain dew fell of the mountain
Now we're drinking from the fountain
Broke the pipe
Fountain broke
Now we're drinking
Plain ol' COKE!
-Av5a and Rya2n; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43683MEh8j4 ;
June 25, 2010

Editor: This video can also be found in below Down By The Banks of The Hanky Panky, version #21.

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I STEP IN
I step in you step out. you hop in i hop out. When i jump in you hop out. When i spin in you spin out. When i jump in you sit down. When i clap one time you clap two times. You stand up i sit down. I jump clap i hop clap also i can spin and clap.
-Raaziq, age 8, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 3/24/2006

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I WENT DOWNTOWN TO SEE CHARLIE BROWN

Editor:
I’ve posted all of these "I went downtown to see Charlie Brown" rhyme together with their first line used as their title. It’s interesting to note how a number of these examples include “floating verses" from other playground rhymes.

I WENT DOWNTOWN TO MEET CHARLIE BROWN (Example #1)
heres one that me and my friends do:

i Went down town to meet charlie brown
he gave me a nickle that bought me a pickle
the pickle was sour so he bought me a flower
the flower was dead so this is what he said:
down down baby down by the rollercoaster
sweet sweet baby never wana let you go
just because i kissed you doesnt mean i love you
shimmy shimmy coco puffs
shimmy shimmy pow
shimmy shimmy coco puffs
shimmy shimmy pow
My momy your momy live across the street
18,19 Alligator street
Boom Bang Choo Choo Train
wind me up i do my thang
( hit the person beside you)
Oops i'm Sorry!"
-Sarah, Octoblog, Schoolyard games; 7/17/2005

Here's a video of a version of this rhyme

Uploaded by MikeInBA on Jun 26, 2009
Mallory and Samara playing a clapping game together along with a "chant"
-snip-
Here's another video of that rhyme which is recited with a lot of "attitude":

Shaylin Went down town

Uploaded by TheGenaille on May 30, 2010

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I WENT DOWNTOWN TO SEE JAMES BROWN (Example #2)
I went downtown to see James Brown
I gave him a nickel to buy me a pickle
The pickle was sour, so he gave me a shower
The shower was cold, so he gave me a bowl
The bowl was cracked, so he gave me a snack
Now I want my money back, Jack
-bettingonalice, http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php, Octoblog, Schoolyard Games, 1/1/2007

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I WENT DOWNTOWN TO SEE CHARLIE BROWN (Example #3)
i went down town to see Charlie Brown
he gave me a nickle so i bough a pickle
the pickle was sour so he gave me a flower
the flower was dead and this is what he said
"down down baby down by the ocean,
sweet sweet baby never should i let you go,
chity chity bang bang i know kar-out-tay,
chity chity bang bang show off your body,
chity chity bang bang freeze.
and never ever let your mama say tell you to say please
-Guest, Baby*Shake; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350 I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes; 1/31/2008

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I WENT DOWNTOWN TO MEET CHARLIE BROWN (Example #4)
i went down town to meet Charlie Brown
He gave me a nickle so i got a pickle
The pickle was sour so he gave me a flower
The flower was dead and this is what he said
Down down baby up on the rollercoaster,
Sweet sweet baby never should i let you go,
Just because I kissed you doesn't mean I love you.
Shimmy shimmy coconut I know karate.
Shimmy shimmy coconut, Oops I'm sorry.
That's not funny. I'm tellin mommy
Mommy!
-macdaddyeo1 on Feb 9, 2010 , http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY1r5Mr-XmM&feature=related (transcribed from video by Azizi Powell)

This rhyme is made up of three "stand alone" rhymes which are often combined together. "Stand alone rhymes" are rhymes which can be recited alone. Rhyme #1's first line is "I went downtown to meet Charlie Brown. Rhyme #2's first line is "Down down bably down by the rollercoaster. Rhyme #3's first line is "Shimmy shimmy coconut".

Here's that video:

i madi i went downtown to meet charlie brown

Uploaded by macdaddyeo1 on Feb 9, 2010 ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY1r5Mr-XmM )

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I WENT DOWNTOWN TO SEE CHARLIE BROWN (Example #6)
i know a different one, its sorta the same

i went downtown to see charlie brown
he gave me a nickle so i gave him a pickle
the pickle was sour so i gave him a flower
the flower was dead and this is wat he said
shimmy shimmy coconut i know karate
shimmy shimmy coconut oops im sorry
shimmy shimmy coconut dont tell mommy
shimmy shimmy coconut mommy mommy
shimmy shimmy coconut freeze

and then whoever moves first loses then the other person wins i mite mak a vid to show you with my sis k by
-Katie, 2013 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY1r5Mr-XmM)

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I WENT TO THE CHINESE RESTAURANT
As a long time collector of English language playground rhymes, it is my (non-scientifically researched) conclusion that East Asians are the public brunt of racist rhymes (and actions such as stretching the eyes while reciting the rhyme) MUCH more than Black people or any other People of Color or "minority". "I Went To The Chinese Restaurant" is one of the main English language playground rhyme which MIGHT have racist (prejudicial, insulting, ridiculing) lines about Asians, particularly East Asian people.

Regardless of the intent, these rhymes that negatively depict Asians can be hurtful to Asian children and other Asian people. And, in the long run, if not the short run, they are also harmful to those who say them, as it inculcates a disregard for other people’s feelings. In that sense, these rhymes are harmful to our entire society.

I believe that children shouldn't recite rhymes that ridicule or otherwise insult people's race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation etc. But, no matter how much parents and guardians may try to shield their children from these rhymes, the children are likely to hear them-on the school bus, or from their other children who may or may not have intended harm.

I also believe that parent & guardians of Children of Color (Asian, American Indian, Latino, Black etc) should not only help those children develop good self-esteem, but should help them develop good group esteem (meaning, feeling good about their race). Given the Anglo-Centric world we live in, most White children will grow up feeling good about their race, but this is far from easy for Children of Color. I also think that Children of Color need to learn what to do when faced with prejudice. "Sucking it up" and acting like it's no big deal is very toxic. I don't think that is always the right way to approach racist experiences.

Furthermore, I believe that it's important for parents & guardians to learn how best to advocate for their children. Sometimes it’s better to let their children deal with these kinds of matters themselves. Hopefully, those children will be strengthened by the self-esteem and (racial/ethnic) group esteem that their parents/guardians have helped them develop and the coping skills that their parents/guardians have taught them.

Here's a link to a post about a racist version of "I Went To The Chinese Restaurant" http://imaginationsoup.net/2011/01/innocent-hand-clapping-racist-song/ "Innocent Handclap Or Racist Song" by Melissa Taylor on 11 Jan 2011
Also, read the comments to that article, including a comment that I wrote in 2011.

Also, this Cocojams post may be of interest to those persons who study racism in playground rhymes: http://cocojams.com/content/racist-playground-rhymes

With that introduction, here are what I believe to be non-offensive examples of "I Went To The Chinese Restaurant":

I WENT TO THE CHINESE RESTAURANT (Version #1)
My daughter, who is eight, is still doing clapping rhymes, though the ones she does are different from the ones I did in the 50s and 60s. (These, by the way, are in England). The one she seems to do mostly is:

I went to a Chinese restaurant
To buy me a loaf of bread, bread, bread.
He wrapped it up in a five pound note
And this is what he said, said, said:

My name is
Elvis Presley,
Girls are sexy
Sitting in the back seat
Drinking pepsi.

Where's your father?
Died in a fishtank..Last night
What did he die of?..Raw fish.
How did he die..Like this.
-MBSLynne; 9/21/2003; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097#1022419 ; "Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?"

-snip-

There are a lot of different versions of "I Went To A Chinese Restaurant", Here is a YouTube video of one version of that widely known rhyme:

Chinese Restaurant

Posted by gdl121110
April 03, 2009

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I WENT TO A CHINESE RESTAURANT (Version #2)
I went to a Chinese restaurant to buy a loaf of bread bread bread.
And when he put it in the oven, this is what he said said said.
My name is nee-ay nee-ay nicka nicka-lodeon pom pom poodle willy willy whisker
My name is freeze
(At that point we'd freeze and whoever moved was out.)
-Sarah H., White female, from her memories of her childhood in Oil City, PA in the mid 1990s; collected by Azizi Powell, 4/23/2005

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I WENT TO A CHINESE RESTAURANT (Version #3)
I went to a Chinese resturant to buy a loaf of bread
The waiter asked my name and this is what I said:
My name is Eli Eli
Chickali Chickali
Pom Pom Beauty
Extra Cutie
I know karate
Punch you in the body Oops! I'm sorry
Tell my Mommy
Don't wanna miss yah
Don't wanna kiss yah
Chinese
Chapstick
Indian
Freeze!
(this one was soooo hard to memorize =__= first one to move loses)
-Grace Kim, http://battery-d.livejournal.com/87113.html; 12/17/2005

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I WENT TO A CHINESE RESTAURANT (Version #4)
This is a hand clap game that we always did in elementary school:

I went to a Chinese restaurant to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread.
They asked me what my name was and this is what I said, said, said.
My name is...
Elvis Presley
Boys are messy
Sittin’ in a hot tub
Drinkin’ diet Pepsi
My name is...
Eli Eli
Ikini, ikini
Pom pom poodles
Willy wally wiskers
My name is...
Chief! Roast Beef! (or bang bang you’re dead. Brush your teeth and go to bed) (or I know karate, punch you in the body, oops! I’m sorry, don’t tell my mommy)
-Katie S. (White female, age 17; Dallas, Texas), 10/6/2009

Editor:
I want to thank Katie and other persons who remembered to include demographical information. That information helps those folklorists who study which populations chant certain rhymes and when those rhymes are known in certain geographical locations.

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I WENT TO MCDONALDS
I went to McDonalds, got a big Mac, took a big bite and it bit me back, walked up to the counter, said whats the deal, she slapped me in the face with a happy meal, neh neh neh neh neh(McDonalds theme) I'M SUEIN DEM
-Julian M.; February 21, 2011

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JELLY ON A PLATE (Jump Rope Rhyme, Version #1)
We used to play skipping ropes to this song: Jelly on a plate, jelly on a plate, wibble wobble, wibble wobble, jelly on a plate. We would skip pretending we were wobbling like a jelly.
The next verse was: Sausage in a pan, sausage in a pan, sizzle sazzle, sizzle sazzle, sausage in a pan. To that we would cross and uncross our feet as we jumped. There were many other verses but I can't remember them. Anyone else know?
-Guest PM; 2/21/2000; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18352 Playground songs

Editor:
A related rhyme "Sweeties In The Jar" is posted below.

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JELLY ON A PLATE (Elastics; Version #2)
I have just remembered we used this rhyme for French skipping (elastics):
Jelly on a plate, jelly on a plate
Wibble-wobble-wibble-wobble, jelly on a plate.
(that was - left (straddle the left band)/ middle/ right/ middle/ left-right-left-right, middle/ stamp). The rhythm was filled out by little snatch-backs onto the balls of the feet (/).
-Greenacres; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=102 ; Child's Game: Elastics ; March 2, 2008

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JINGLE JANGLE (Elastics) Version #1
Jingle Jangle Silver Bangle Inside Outside Inside STAMP!

Two people stood at either end with a loop of tied elastic bands rounds their legs; first at their ankles, then knees, then waist, then "oxter" if your Scottish", then neck...

I used to love that...
-swirlygirl ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932 ; Elastics; April 25, 2002

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JINGLE JANGLE (Elastics) Version #1
Elastics used to be something everyone played... [Sidney, Australia]
Yeah, we used knickers elastics too, and it went from ankles, to knees, under-bums, hips, armpits then necks.

Some rhymes:
Jingle Jangle, inside outside, jingle jangle on. [You basically, straddle one side, bounce until you get to the next word. At inside outside, you do just that, jump inside then out side, continue the bouncing, then step on it.]
-Guest,Cath.; 3/1/2008; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=46932&messages=98 ; Child's Game: Elastics

K,L
KEEP THE KETTLE BOILING (Jump Rope Rhyme)
Diamonds, Rubies, Pearls and Aces
Keep the kettle boilin n leave no spaces.

We use to jump rope to this in the early 60's in Stow, Ohio. "Leave no spaces" meant as soon as one person in the double dutch jumping, another one in line had to jump right in behind her - without letting the rope come around again.
-Guest, Belinda; 8/22/2007

Editor:
I'd like to thank Guest Belinda and other Mudcat Discussion Forum guests for contributing examples to the Cocojams collection of rhymes. I've titled this example "Keep The Kettle Boiling" though it could be titled "Diamonds, Rubies etc" or "Leave no places".
Incidentally, I first heard this rhyme sung in 2007 by African American girls {about 9-12 years old} in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The rhyme was performed in the exact same way as is given above, except the girls were playing with a single rope. The Pittsburgh students told me that they had learned this rhyme from one of their female teachers.

The teacher and I both had recess duty, and I asked her about that rhyme. She said she sung "Keep The Kettle Boiling" when she was a child in Pittsburgh in the 1980s. During that conversation we both lamented the fact that, at least in this school, girls rarely sing any rhymes when they jump rope. Also, for what it's worth, girls in this inner city school don't do handclap routines or foot stomping cheers during recess. And it's not because they are shy around boys, because the girls and boys have separate lunches and recess. I've collected handclaps, cheerleader cheers, and foot stomps a number of these students so I know they know them. My sense is girls don't do them "in public" because they are concerned about being teased by their female (or male) peers.

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THE KISSING RHYME (Jump Rope; Handclap rhyme, Version #1)
X and Y sitting in a tree -- k-i-s-s-i-n-g
First comes love -- then comes marriage -- then comes X with a baby carriage.

Maybe kids today should sing that one -- love/marriage/children -- I think it would be good to go back to that order.
-seventythree ; http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&add... "Anybody remember jumprope rhymes?" ;Apr-23-05

Editor:
Here's a comment from Sparkly, another poster on that discussion thread on that same date: "Yes, I remember that one! That was a great one for teasing kids who had crushes on each other."

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THE KISSING RHYME (Jump Rope; Handclap rhyme, Version #2)
Susie* and Johnny* sitting in a tree,
K-I-S-S-I-N-G!
First comes love,
Then comes marriage,
Then comes Johnny with a baby carriage,
Suckin' his thumb,
Wettin' his pants,
Doin' the Hula-Hula Dance!

*Insert names of your choice.
-Shopping Sheryl - home from the hospital; http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/389058 Which playground rhyme do you remember most?; September 2nd, 2007

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(boy classmate’s name) and (girl classmate’s name) sittin’ in a tree
K-I-S-S-I-N-G
First comes love
Then comes marriage
Then comes (boy’s name) in a baby carriage!

The rest of that, where I grew up, is:

Get out the diapers
Get out the pins
(name) and (name)
Just had twins!
Twins, triplets, put them in the bath
How many babies did they have?

And then you counted until you stopped skipping. I am not sure why you put twins and triplets in the bath specifically, except that it sort of rhymes with ‘have’. Sort of. Not really. Oh well!
- Farore ; http://kateharding.net/2009/10/02/miss-lucy-had-friday-fluff/ Shapely Pose; October 5, 2009

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LAST NIGHT AND THE NIGHT BEFORE (Jump Rope Rhyme; Version #1)
Last night the night before
twenty five robbers at my door.
I got up to let them in.
and this is what they said to me.
Lady bird, lady bird
turn all around around around
Lady bird, lady bird
touch the ground the ground, the ground
Lady bird, lady bird
say your prayers, your prayers, your prayers
Lady bird, lady bird
step right OUT!
-Azizi Powell; childhood memories of Atlantic City, New Jersey; 1950s

Editor:
The person jumping does the movements as directed by the words, but does not sing the words. On the word "OUT", the jumper jumps out, and the next jumper jumps in. "Lady bird" probably originally was "lady bug".

See the related examples of "Not Last Night But The Night Before" and "I Love Coffee I Love Tea" on http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2

In addition, some lines from this rhyme are found in certain examples of "Down Down Baby" (also known as "Shimmy Shimmy Co Co Pa") that are posted on this page..

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LAST NIGHT AND THE NIGHT BEFORE (Version #2)
Here is a song we used to do on the playground in Birmingham, AL back in the 80s:

Last night and the night before I met my boyfriend at the candy store
He brought me ice cream he brought me cake
he brought me home with a stomachache
mama mama i feel sick
call the doctor quick quick quick
doctor doctor will i die
close you eyes and count to five
i said a one, a two, a three, a four, a five
I'm alive

[Optional part] we would do sometimes (a little risque for little girls):

see that house on top of that hill
that's where me and my baby gon' live
we gon' cook some cornbread
cook some meat
come on baby let's go to bed and do the boom boom boom.
-Joi; 3/23/2008

Editor: The R&B song "Jump Back" by Rufus Thomas includes this children's rhyme as well as rhyming verses from African American playground songs & dance songs from the 1920s and earlier (such as went to the river/couldn't get across/ paid 5 dollas for an old gray hoss). Variant forms of those lines are found in the African American children's rhymes "Take A Peach Take A Plum" and related rhymes. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPqcccmiOMc for that video.

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LEANZIES CLAPZIES [ball bouncing rhyme]
leanzies, clapzies,
turn around and backzies,
right hand, left hand,
highzies, lowzies,
touch your heel,
touch your toe,
touch your knee
and under we go.

I did this in Minn. in the late 50's early 60's. You bounced a ball and did the directions until you missed.
-M. Karas, January 4, 2014

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LEMONADE, CRUNCHY ICE (Version #1)
Lemonade (clap, clap, clap)
Crunchy ice (clap, clap, clap)
Beat it once (clap, clap, clap)
Beat it twice (clap, clap, clap)
Lemonade, crunchy ice,
Beat it once, beat it twice,
Lemonade, crunchy ice,
Beat it once, beat it twice (gets faster and faster and continues until someone misses a clap)
-Guest, Sharon; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097
"Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?" ; 9/22/2007

**
Here's a video of three girls doing handclaps to "Lemonade, Crunchy Ice" in Spanish:

sweetbeginnings
July 22, 2008

**
Also see an example of "Lemonade" performed in the video posted above for "Chinese Checkers".

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LEMONADE, CRUNCHY ICE (Version #2)
Duh silly we still do hand clappys, it makes us happy!!!!! Love ya`ll !

Lemonade ( clap clap clap )
Crunchy ice ( clap clap clap )
Beat it once ( clap clap clap )
Beat it twice ( clap clap clap )
Lemonade, crunchy ice
Beat it once, beat it twice
Lemonade, crunchy ice
Beat it once, beat it twice
Turn around ( literally )
Touch the ground ( literally )
Give that partner a high five ( literally )

We made 20 dollars at a lemonade stand
Just exactly as we planned
Now how should I should I spend the money with my friends
How bout the candy store
But daddy say don't spend it on that
Cause mommy say that will give you cavities and make you fat
Take it Back
Take it Back
The way you say that, gave me a slap
Right in the back
Slap Slap
Nick Nack
slap slap
aimed exactly too my back
candy bars ( clap clap clap)
lollypops (clap clap clap)
eat it once ( clap clap clap)
eat it twice ( clap clap clap)
Candy bars, jelly beans
now looky there our teeth turned green
now looky there my butt dont fit in my brand new jeans!
Slap Slap
Now I am fat
Mommy aint to happy, thats a fact!

From the Hot Hottie's from Europe
Love Ya`ll ! KISSY WISSY! Like Totally! DUH!
- Guest,The Hotties from Europe; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097 : "Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?"; 6/14/2007

Editor:
This example may be at least two rhymes strung together. If so, the 2nd rhyme might start at the line "We made 20 dollars at a lemonade stand". The word "literally" which is in parenthesis is probably not spoken but describes the movement that you are supposed to do when saying that word.

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LEMONADE CRUSHED ICE (Version #3)
lemonaid crushed ice
beat it once beat it twice
lemonde crushed ice beat it one beat it twice
turn around touch the ground break it down kick your boyfriend out
of town and freeze.
-Guest, Lex11; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=63097
"Folklore: Do kids still do clapping rhymes?" ; 10/29/2007

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LEMONADE CRUNCHY ICE (Version #3)
lemonade
crunchy ice
sip it once
sip it twice

lemonade
crunchy ice
sip it once
sip it twice

turn around
touch the ground
stand back up
& break it down
-MomWith3; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fObLyGkV_mA&feature=grec_index Lemonade; June 23, 2009

Here's that video:

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LEMONADE ICE TEA (Version #5 of Lemonade Chunchy Ice)
lemonade ice tea coca cola pepsi (faster) lemonade ice tea coca pepsi spin around touch the ground kick ur boyfriend outta town FREEZE!
-sk8tergal513,11/2/2009; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqzGuHSI7O4&feature=rec-r2-2r-4-HM (This video is posted on this page after Version #1 of this rhyme)

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LEMONADE CRUNCHY ICE (Version #6)
i have a nother hand claping gameits called lemenade

Lemanade (Clap Clap Clap) Crunchy Ice (Clap Clap Clap)
Beat it onece (Clap Clap Calp) Beat it twice (Clap Clap Clap)
Lemonade Crunch Ice Beat It onece Beat it twice Turn around
Touch the ground Frrrreaze America Chease Cha Cha Cha
izzy; -http://hubpages.com/hub/Recess-is-BACK-Hand-Clapping-Games ; 2010; retrieved August 29, 2010

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LEMONADE CRUNCHY ICE (Version #7)
lemonade crunchy ice beat it once beat it twice lemonade crunchy ice beat it once beat it twice turn around touch the ground freeze salt and pepper scobby dobby doo the boys go kiss and the girls go woooo coca cola pepsi cola boys got the mucles the teachers cant count the girls have the sexy legs u better watch out were going to hipmotise u parazle u turn around and faint
-http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_some_hand_clapping_games ; retrieved September 21, 2010

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LOOK AT THAT
Look at that girl
Walkin down the street
Her jeans so tight
I bet she can't breathe.
Her shirt so high
You can see her belly.

Look at that guy
Walkin down the street.
His pants so low
His underwear show.

Look at that child
Walkin down the street
With a toy in his hand
and nothin* on his feet.

Look at that baby
Crawlin down the street
With a diaper on his butt
And it's real soggy.

Look at that city-It's ghetto.
Look around teh corner
You see a drunk fellow.
-Maleka and Malikia; video posted by maleka911
September 13, 2008 & subsequently removed from YouTube
(transcribed by Azizi Powell, 3/28/2010)

* I'm not sure about this word.

** The title refers to the fact that there were two earlier "takes" for this video before this one was filmed.

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Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes-2 for selected examples of hand clap, jump rope, and elastic rhymes whose names begin with a letter from M-Z.

**
Please send examples of hand clap, jump rope (skipping), ball bouoncing, and/or elastic rhymes to cocojams17@yahoo.com for possible posting on this page.

Examples are posted for their creative, folkloric value.

Your email address is never posted or shared.

Or if you are on facebook, visit me at cocojams jambalayah, and befriend me, or send me a private message!

Please be aware that by sharing your examples or comments with me, you are giving me permission to include it in a book or in any other off-line publication

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