Children's Game Songs And Movement Rhymes

Sep
13

CHILDREN'S GAME SONGS & MOVEMENT RHYMES

This page contains selected examples & comments about English language children's singing games and movement rhymes*. In the United States, many of these examples would be categorized as "play party songs". In some of these games, the rhyme or chant may only be the first part of the game. In other examples, the rhyme is the entire game.

Ms. Azizi Powell, Founder/Editor
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Latest revision: March 9, 2014

COMMENTS ABOUT THE EXAMPLES ON THIS PAGE
This page also contains a limited number of chants that aren't connected to songs or movements. "Knock Knock" (also known as "What Do You Want"), "That's Tough", "What's Your Name Puddin Tain", and the chant "You Remind Me Of A Man" are all examples of those types of chants.

In addition to game songs & movement rhymes, other categories of children's playground rhymes & cheers are listed under this Cocojams section on the right hand side of this page. Click the title of the type of rhymes or cheers that you are interested in.

*Examples of the Akan language [West African game "Kye Kye Kule" ("Che Che Cole") are posted on this Cocojams page partly because of the song itself and partly because I collected English language versions of that song from children in the 1980s (see "Jay Jay Kukalay and J. J. Coolaid in http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 )

FOLKLORIC APPROACH TO RHYMES & CHEERS
Cocojams features multiple versions of examples of rhymes. I'm interested in posting multiple versions of specific rhymes as a means of documenting the continuity & changes that may occur with a particular rhyme over time and/or among different populations at the same time. I’m also interested in a folkloric approach to English language children's game songs, rhymes, and cheers. By "folkloric approach", I mean documenting and analyzing demographical, etymological, and sociological information about the lyrics and performance activities of these examples.

Sources of Examples
Many examples posted on this website were sent to Cocojams.com by this site's visitors. Other examples are from my personal recollections or my direct (face to face) collection. Some examples of children's game songs, rhymes, and cheers that are featured on Cocojams are from selected websites. Most of the examples from other websites are reposted with prior permission. A small number of examples are from published books and/or recorded songs.

I always acknowlege reposted material by including a hyperlink to its original site or by including offline publishing information. However, if any site manager, editor, or book publisher would like me to remove examples that I have reposted from their site or their published work, please contact me at cocojams17@yahoo.com , and I will remove those examples.

Note: Links to http://blog.oftheoctopuses.com/000518.php now leads to a page that is different than the small blog that included a thread on school yard games. For folkloric purposes, I'm retaining what appears to be an inactive link with examples from that blog. If anyone has information about the blog that used to be called The Octoblog, Whee! Blog, or blog oftheoctopuses, please contact me at cocojams17@yahoo.com.

Sources of Videos
All videos embedded on Cocojams .com are from http://www.youtube.com/ . Videos are posted on this site for educational, entertainment, aesthetic, historical, and folkloric purposes. All rights to these videos remain with their respectful owners.

I sincerely thank all the video uploaders whose videos I have reposted on Cocojams.com. I also sincerely thank YouTube.com for helping to make these videos available to the general public. If an uploader of a video sends a request to cocojams17@yahoo.com for me to remove his or her video from Cocojams.com, I will do so. Please note that links to YouTube videos or to other online resources may not remain viable. Please also be aware that comments posted on YouTube viewer comments threads may not be suitable for children.

How Examples Are Presented
Examples of game songs & rhymes are usually posted in alphabetical order in chronological order by date of example remembered, submitted, or found. given first. I have either used the title the example's contributor gave for that example or I have given a title to each of these examples. The title is usually the first word or the first couple of words of the rhyme or song. The exception to this title rule is that when I believe that the first word that appears in the rhyme is part of an introductory phrase such as "Blue bells, cockle shells, eevy, ivy, over", "Ready, set, go", or "Shame shame shame", I'll place the rhyme under the first letter of the first word of the actual rhyme.

Examples of rhymes & cheers are almost always posted the way that readers send them to this website. Some of these examples have typos and other accidental spelling errors or have text messaging, slang, or otherwise purposely misspelled words & phrases. Many of these examples are written without any capitalization at the beginning of a line or punctuation mark at the end of line. This free flowing writing style appears to be the prevailing way that many youth and young adults informally write on the Internet. Posting examples written this way may result in difficulty understanding the examples. However, I believe that it is important to keep the examples' original form for authenticity's sake and as a means of showcasing the examples' "flavor".

Multiple examples of the same words or of similar words to a specific rhyme may be posted as a means of documenting that this game is known by more than one group of people, and also as a means of documenting some of the locations where this game is known.

How To Send In Examples
Please send examples of rhymes, game songs and cheers to cocojams17@yahoo.com.

Your email address is never posted or shared.

Or, if you are on facebook, visit me at cocojams jambalayah, and befriend me, or send me a private message!

Please be aware that by sharing your examples or comments with me, you are giving me permission to include it in a book or in any other off-line publication.

Although it's not required, please include information about how this rhyme is performed. Also, for the sake of folkloric research, please include the following demographical information: where you learned the rhyme {please include the city & state if within the USA, and the nation, if outside the USA}; when you learned this rhyme (year or decade such as 2008, the 1990s, or the mid 1970s); and who performed this rhyme (age, gender, race/ethnicity). Thanks!

I reserve the right not to post examples of rhymes on this page that are exactly the same as a previously posted example. I also reserve the right not to post examples of rhymes that I feel don't meet the standards of this website.

Thanks to all those who have submitted examples for possible posting on this page. Thanks also to those websites from which I have found rhymes & game songs which I have reposted to this page. Special thanks to those who remember to include demographical information and/or performance instructions about tow the game is played.

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RHYME EXAMPLES (Children's Game Songs & Other Movement Rhymes)

24 BOXES

Jamaican children ring games

Uploaded by ochoriostube on Jun 13, 2009

"She can do the 24 boxes, up and down the 24 boxes"

-snip-
Here's my transcription of the words. Additions & corrections are welcome:

There she [he] goes around the ring
around the ring
around the ring
And if you see her [him] way over yonder
Tell him [her] you love her [him]
and give him 24 boxes
She can do the 24 boxes
Up and down the 24 boxes

-snip-

The way this game is played reminds me of the performance activity for the USA singing games "Little Sally Walker Walking Down The Street" and "Here We Go Ride That Pony". [Examples of those singing games are found below]

Here's the performance description for 24 boxes and the two other above mentioned songs:

The group forms a wide circle [also called "the ring"].

One person is selected to stand in the middle of the circle.

The people forming the circle begin singing while standing in place. They may also clap and stomp their feet in time to the beat.

The middle person doesn't sing, but runs or walks around the inside of the circle .

At a specific point in the song, the middle person stands in front of someone who, presumably, he or she randomly picks.

The middle person then does some type of movement which the person she or he is standing in front of has to exactly mimic.

After this action [or after doing this two times], the middle person exchanges places with the person in the middle, and becomes the new middle person.

The song begins again without any interruption. This continues until the group decides to stop or has to stop because game time is over.

A, B
ALL AROUND THE KITCHEN
(Chorus 2X)
All around the kitchen
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
All around the kitchen
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo

Now you stop right still
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
And you turn around
Then you touch the ground
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo

(Chorus 1X)

Now you stop right still
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
Put your hands on your hips
Cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
And let your right foot slip
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
(Chorus 1X)

Now you stop right still
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
Put your hands on your nose
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
And then touch your toes

(Chorus 1X)

Now you stop right still
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
Put your hands in the air
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
And wave them up there

Chorus 1X
(repeat previous verses and end with)

All around the kitchen
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
All around the kitchen
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
All around the kitchen
cock-a-doodle-doodle doo
- traditional African American children's movement game, with additional verses by Azizi Powell

-snip-
I taught this movement game from 1997-2006 to children as well as the teen & adult staff who were part of game song groups & events that I facilitated in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. "All Around The Kitchen" is a follow the leader game . The words have a call & response pattern. When I taught this game we moved in a zig zag fashion.

Click for http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=104001#2125148 for information about the earliest known documentation of this game from African American children in the 1940s.

Also click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/let-your-right-foot-slip-origin.... for Part I of a two part series on the verse "put your hands on your hips/and let your right foot slip".

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/let-your-right-foot-slip-videos-...
for Part II of this series.

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ALL HID (Version #1)
Honey, honey, bee ball,
I can't see y'all.
All hid?
"No-o-o!"
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"

I went to the river,
I couldn't get across.
I paid five dollars for an old gray horse.
One leg broke,
the other leg cracked,
And great Godamighty how the horse did rack.
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"

I went down the road,
The road was muddy.
Stubbed my toe
And made it bloody.
'S all hid?
"No-o-o!"
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"

Me and my wife and a bobtail dog,
We crossed that river on a hickory log.
She fell in, and I fell off,
And left nobody but the bobtail dog.
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"

One, two, I don't know what to do.
Three, four, I don't know where to go.
Five, six, I'm in a terrible fix.
Seven, eight, I made a mistake.
Nine, ten, My eyes open— I'm lookin
-Bessie Jones, vocal. (a Georgia Sea Isle version) recorded c. 1970 in Los Angeles by Bess Hawes on "Games and Dances from the Past Band 4, Item 1; Old Mother Hippletoe-Rural And Urban Children's Songs, New World BQ 291; http://www.newworldrecords.org/linernotes/80291.pdf [reposted on Mudcat by Azizi Powell 12/28/2008)

Editor: Here's an excerpt from the record notes written by Kate Rinzler: "The words of "All Hid" derive from three sources. The variations of the query "All hid?," the responses from hiding children, and the counting out by ones, twos, and so on are commonplaces in hide-and-seek as played in England and America; the countout formula ("One, two...") is a counting rhyme like the well-known "One, two, buckle my shoe"; and the verses about acquiring a lame horse to cross a river are borrowed from humorous songs of black tradition." (pp 29-30).

****
ALL HID (Version #2)
...I didn't grow up in Georgia. I grew up near San Francisco, CA. Our version was slightly different.

Honey, honey, you'd be all,
but I can't see y'all.
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"
Is all hid?
"No-o-o!"
Went to the river but we couldn't get across
We'd paid five dollars for an ol' dead horse.
It's back was broke and it's knee was cracked,
And God all mighty how the horse did rack.
Is all hid?"No-o-o!" Is all hid?"No-o-o!"
I went down the road, The road was muddy.
Stubbed my toe And made it bloody.
Is all hid?"No-o-o!" Is all hid?"No-o-o!"
Me and my wife and a bobtailed dog,
Crossed that river on a hick'ry log.
She fell in, and I fell off,
that left nobody but the bobtailed dog.
Is all hid?"No-o-o!" Is all hid?"No-o-o!"

[Tune changes:]

Well, I ain't been to 'Frisco,
I aint been to school,
I aint been to college
but I aint no fool.
To the left to the right
To the sa-sa-side.

Is all hid?
Nooo.
Is All hid...
Nooo.

One, two, don't know what to do.
Three, four I'm coming out the door,
Five Six Hide or be in a fix
Seven Eight It's getting really late
Nine ten Too bad 'cause I'm a coming

-end of rhyme-

I was looking for that [The "All Hid" rhyme that's posted as version #1] because I wanted to teach it to children who are in my game song group who can't seem to count long enough for the others to hide. I'd asked other people for the lyrics and they just looked at me like, "Huh?" I was beginning to think I imagined playing the game like that.

When playing as a kid we usually only got a few verses in before everyone would stop responding. Occasionally someone who not from our neighborhood wouldn't realize that silence meant everyone was hidden so they'd keep singing until some impatient kid would shout "YES, ALREADY! SHUT UP!" Also, the San Francisco lyric and the school lyric were both kind of ironic additions considering at the time we were all going to school in what was then the 415 area code, and everyone had been to the city.
-Guest, Allyn; Folklore: Hide and Seek, in other languages; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=117330&messages=5 ; 4/11/2010

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AUNT JENNY DIED
See "Sally Died" below.

****
BESE DOWN
Editor: This is a repost of a comment that I wrote for a Mudcat Discussion Forum thread:

Somewhat off topic: this may be of interest to those interested in the phrases "bessie down" and "bessy dung" used in this song and others.

I found the probable answer {or answers} in the book/CD "Brown Girl In The Ring, An Anthology of Song Games from the Eastern Caribbean",Alan Lomax,J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes
{New York, Pantheon Books, 1997, pp.66-67.

The song is as follows:

BESE DOWN*
Group: Lauren, Lauran, bese down,
Lauren, Lauren, bese down.
We no dry like a bambam
Bese down
We no neery, neeray.
Bese down,
We no dry like a bambam,
Bese down.

Lauren: Red rose, red rose, bese down.
Group: Red rose, red rose, bese down.
We no drylike a bambam,
Bese down etc.

Lauren: Green rose, green rose, bese down,
Group: Green rose, green rose, bese down, etc.
(sung by a group of children 9-11, Trinidad)

end of quote.
*Accents marks are written over the two e's in the word "bese",

To Play: Children stand in a ring [circle] with one child {Lauren} in teh center.Each child making up the circle has claimed a colored rose as a name ... Lauren bows down {bese down} as the first verse is sung, either by kneeling or winding her waist in a downward upeard spiral. At the beginning of the second verse she calls on another child to join her {red rose, red rose, bese down}and the two bow down together. Then they decide which rose they will call on for the third repetition.. and so on. When all the children are inside the ringm they sing, 'All rose, all rose, bese down'.

On the island of Jamaica children play a game called "Bessie Down" in which "Bessie is instructed to walk, jump etc. It seems likely, however, that the term "bese" is a creolization of the French word "baisser," meaning "to bow", though there is some punning possible with the French term "baiser", meaning to kiss. "Bambam" means "pumpkin",and in the Trinidad they soometimes sing, "For the sake of the pumpkin, bese down". But no one has yet offered an explanation for the word 'neeray'".
- Alan Lomax,J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes; Brown Girl In The Ring, An Anthology of Song Games from the Eastern Caribbean (New York, Pantheon Books, 1997) pp.66-67.

****
BEWARE
Beware, ready set go.
Beware.
We're coming through.
No one can stop us.
Not even you.
We got the power
To over roll.
So BEWARE!
-Toya L. & Montel; (Pittsburgh, PA),1999; collected by Azizi Powell, 1999

Editor:
Toya shared with me that she and her girlfriends chanted "Beware" in the late 1980s while they walked down the sidewalk with linked hands. As the words of the chant indicated, the girls wouldn't let anyone break their link,making people step aside to get out of their way. While Toya chanted this song, her 7 year old son joined in and said the words right along with her. Toya was surprised that Montel knew the words. In response to her question, Montel said that he and his friends link hands and "sing" Beware the same way she and her friends did.

"Beware. Ready set go" is an introductory phrase that announces the beginning of the rhyme. The word "over roll" probably means "overrule".

****
THE BIG SHIP SAILS ON THE ALLY ALLY OH
The big ship sails on the ally-ally-oh
The ally-ally-oh, the ally-ally-oh
Oh, the big ship sails on the ally-ally-oh
On the last day of September.

The captain said it will never, never do
Never, never do, never, never do
The captain said it will never, never do
On the last day of September.

The big ship sank to the bottom of the sea
The bottom of the sea, the bottom of the sea
The big ship sank to the bottom of the sea
On the last day of September.

We all dip our heads in the deep blue sea
The deep blue sea, the deep blue sea
We all dip our heads in the deep blue sea
On the last day of September.
- Source: http://www.rhymes.org.uk/a122-the-big-ship-sails.htm

Editor: Here a sound clip of this classic Great British game song as sung by Kate Rushby & a few children from her family. Sorry, this video doesn't show children playing this game:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5K1Dm4UXLZc

At 2:02 of the following 1944 silent film there's a short scene of children playing the skipping game The big ship sails on the ally ally oh. The girls & boys hold hands and form a chain against the wall and then weave under each others' arms.

Springtime in an English Village (1944)

Posted by BFIfilms/January 09, 2009

Click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/217 to find this video & its edited jambalayah comment thread.

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BLUEBIRD BLUEBIRD (RING PLAY)

Kids at the Deep Creek Middle School(Eleuthera, Bahamas) afternoon program take time out to play a game.

whitfiddy• Published on Dec 19, 2012
-snip-
A ring play is a singing game that is played by people forming a circle. Here are the lyrics for this singing game:

Bluebird Bluebird through my window [3x]
Oh Johnny, I’m tired.
Take a little tap right on my shoulder [3x]
Oh Johnny, I’m tired.
-snip-
Examples of the related singing game "Here Stands A Blue Bird" (or similar titles) are found below under "h".

****
BOB A-NEEDLE
"Bob-a-needle" is a traditional African American game that children play while singing. See these two examples of this game song:

BOB A-NEEDLE (Example #1)
Note: parenthesis represent lines sung by group

Bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Better run, bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Better hustle, bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

I want bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Want to find bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Going to catch bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Turn around, bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

Oh bob, bob-a-needle
(Bob-a-needle is a running)

from: Bessie Jones & Bess Lomax Hawes's book Step It Down: Games, Plays, Songs & Stories from the Afro-American Heritage (University of Georgia Press, 1972, pps. 163-164)

Editor:
Here is the commentary about this game from the book "Step It Down" [WARNING: This commentary mentions the use of a pen knive, but that object shouldn't be used in children's play nowaday.]
"Bob-A-Needle" (bobbin needle?) is for purposes of this game, a pen, a jackknife, or a small stick of wood that can be passed rapidly from hand to hand. All the players but one stand in a tight circle, shoulder to shoulder, holding their hands behind their backs. The extra player stands in the center of the ring [circle]; she closes her eyes and hold the bob-a-needle high over her head in one hand. One of the ring players silently creeps up and takes the bob-a-needle from her hand and puts it behind his own back. The center player then opens her eyes and begins to sing the lead line of the song; the players in the circle sing the refrain...

The lead singer's lines are extemporaneous and can be sung in any order...During the singing, the players in the ring [forming the circle] move the object from hand to hand, trying to move as little as possible in order not to make its location obvious. Bob-a-needle may travel clockwise or counterclockwise, and the players may reverse directions at will. The center player meanwhile reaches around the waist and feels the hands of each ring player in turn; she too may go in either direction, but she may not skip players nor run back and forth across the ring. When the center player reverses the direction of her search, she must signal this with the lead line, "Turn, bob-a-needle!"

This game does not end when someone is caught holding the elusive bob-a-needle. Like most of Mrs. Bessie Jones' games from the Georgia Sea Isle Gullah tradition that involve 'losing', the person simply pays a forfeit and/or takes over the center role so that can begin again. When the players tire, the accumulated forfeits are redeemed by the owners in a new sequence of play."

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BOB A-NEEDLE (Example #2)
Here's the entry from Negro Folk Music U.S.A. (Harold Courlander, 1963):One of the many hiding and finding ring games is "Bob-a Needle," which at least one informant believes was originally "Bobbin Needle." The children form a tight ring, their hands behind them, and rapidly pass an object around the circle. The person standing in the middle, who is "it," tries to locate the moving object. On the lines "Bob-a needle is a-running," the object is in motion. On the lines "Bob-a needle ain't a-running," whoever has possession of it must hold it, and the one who is "it" has a chance to guess its whereabouts. When he thinks he has located it, he calls "You got bob-a."

Well oh bob-a needle, bob-a needle,
And oh bob-a needle.
Bob-a needle is a-running,
Bob-a needle ain't a-running,
Bob-a needle is a-running,
Bob-a needle ain't a-running.

And oh bob-a needle, bob-a needle,
And oh bob-a needle, bob-a needle.
You got bob-a.
- Joe Offer, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=66223 Origins: Bob-a-needle, January 21, 2004
-snip-
Also, Chubby Checker, who is best known for his Twist songs, recorded a R&B version of the African American children's game "bob-a-needle" in 1964. See http://www.lyricsvault.net/songs/10915.html for the lyrics to that record.

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BROWN GIRL IN THE RING
There's a brown girl in the ring
Tra la la la la
There's a brown girl in the ring
Tra la la la la la
Brown girl in the ring
Tra la la la la
She looks like a sugar in a plum
Plum plum

Show me your motion
Tra la la la la
Come on show me your motion
Tra la la la la la
Show me your motion
Tra la la la la
She looks like a sugar in a plum
Plum plum

Skip across the ocean
Tra la la la la
Skip across the ocean
Tra la la la la la
Skip across the ocean
Tra la la la la
She looks like a sugar in a plum
Plum plum.
-Caribbean children's circle game

Editor:
snip-
Other verses are "Skip across the ocean..." and "Who do you choose..."
Here's an excerpt from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Girl_in_the_Ring_(song)
"Brown Girl in the Ring is a children's ring game thought to have originated in Jamaica...

Players form a ring by holding hands, then one girl or boy goes into the middle of the ring and starts skipping or walking around to the song. The girl or boy is then asked, "Show me your motion." At this point the child in the center does his or her favorite dance. If asked "Show me your partner," he or she picks a friend to join him or her in the circle. It has been played for many centuries in all of Jamaica."

-snip-
Brown Girl In The Ring is an example of a show me your motion circle game with one person in the center.

"Brown" in this song probably was originally a reference to the children's skin color as a means of helping Black children develop and reinforce self-esteem.

A contemporary way of playing this game that I observed at a Caribbean day program in 2009 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area is to sing this game to reinforce children's knowledge of their colors. When "Brown Girl In The Ring" is played that way, the color named refers to the colo of the shirt that the person in the center of the circle is wearing. For instance, if the girl in the center of the circle is wearing a "blue" blouse or shirt, the words to the song are "There's a blue girl in the ring" and if the boy in the center of the circle is wearing a red shirt, the words to the song are "There's a red boy in the ring".

**
But given the possible racist or at least culturally insensitive connotations that could result from changing the word "brown" to some other color, I'd probably just sing the "brown girl or brown boy in a ring" words and not replace those words with some other color - regardless if the children in the ring weren't Black (or Brown) or not.

A video example of "Brown Girl In The Ring" that was played in Grenada, West Indies can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVTQdK71WAU&feature=relmfu
Unfortunately, this video is very difficult to see and hear.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/11/boney-m-brown-girl-in-ring-video... for a post on my blog that features a video & lyrics of Boney M's version of "Brown Girl In The Ring" and also includes my comments about this game.

Also, video example of "Brown Girl In The Ring" that was played in Grenada, West Indies can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVTQdK71WAU&feature=relmfu
Unfortunately, this video is very difficult to see and hear.

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BULL INNA PENN

Editor:
"Bull Inna Penn" is one name for a very old children's chasing game that is found in the USA, the Caribbean, and probably also in other English speaking countries. This game is also known as "What's the time, Mr. Wolf", "What time is it Mrs Witch", "What's The Time, Mr Fox", "I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe", "Chicka Ma Chicka Ma Craney Crow" “Chicamy, "Congotay", and other names.

See the entries for "Chicka Ma Chicka Ma Craney Crow", “Chicamy” , "Congotay", and "What's The Time Mr Wolf" on this page.

BULL INNA PENN
This is a tense, rough and super exciting game, much loved by every child (and adults) in Jamaica.

This game is basically a story of a mother hen and her chicken, a bull in the pen and a hawk.

The mother hen is protecting her brood who are tightly lined up behind her, each little chick clutching tightly onto each other and in step with every move that mother hen does.

The Bull is standing a couple feet in front of mother hen, taunting and jeering, making noise, and trying everything to reach behind Mother Hen to grab one of her precious chicks. The game has a song and little play to hit ... here goes-

BULL: Chick, chick, chick?!
Mother Hen: Mi nuh waan nuh corn!
BULL: Chick, chick, chick?!
Mi nuh waan nuh corn!
BULL: Look pon dah peel head one dey!
Mother Hen: Mek him 'tan' (leave him alone)!
BULL: Look pan dah cross yeye one dey
Mother Hen: Mek him 'tan!
BULL: Look pon dah knock knee one dey!
Mother Hen: Mek him 'tan!

Chick chick chick
Mi nuh waan nuh chick

After the bull exhaust his efforts in grabbing one of Mother Hen's chick, a warning is let out that Bredda Hawk is zooming down to grab one

PEEYAWK, DI HAWK IS COMING DUNG
PEEYAWK, DI HAWK IS COMING DUNG
PEEYAWK, DI HAWK IS COMING DUNG
PEEYAWK, DI HAWK IS COMING DUNG
- Xavier Murphy; "Games played by children in Jamaica". http://www.jamaicans.com/culture/intro/childgames.shtml, Published May 1, 2002 retrieved October 29, 2010

C,D
CAPTAIN JINKS
Editor: The following is an excerpt from http://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-historical-quarterly-kansas-play-party-song

"Kansas Play-Party Songs" by Myra E. Hull November 1938 (Vol. 7, No. 4), pages 258 to 286) Kansas Historical Quarterly. November 1938

"Also widely known is the play-party game, "Captain Jinks." [21] It was a popular stage song during the Civil War. My mother and her sisters used to entertain (1864) the soldier boys at Camp Mitchell, Highland county, Ohio, with a parody of this song, one stanza of which ran:

I'm Mrs. Jinks from Madison Square,
I wear fine clothes and curl my hair;
And how the gentlemen at me stare,
While the Captain's in the army!

As a play-party song, it is still popular throughout the United States. Miss Butterfield's version, the play-party arrangement, varies only slightly from my mother's version.

CAPTAIN JINKS
1. Cap - tain Jinks, the horse ma- rines; We clap our hands be -
yond our means, and swing that la - dy while in her teens for
that's the stout of the ar - my. We'll all join hands and
and circle to the left, and circle to the left, and circle to the left.
We'll all join hands and circle to the left, For that's the stout of the ar - my.

2. Captain Jinks, the ladies' knight,
The gentleman changes to the right,
And swings that lady with all his might,
For that's the stout [style] of the army.
When I left home my ma she cried,
My ma she cried, my ma she cried,
When I left home my ma she cried,
For that's the stout of the army.

-snip-
The directions to that play party song are found at that link.

Captain Jinks may be the source of the military cadance "Hey Ho Captain Jack". Examples of that cadence can be found on this Cocojams page: http://cocojams.com/content/military-cadences-other-cadences

****
CHE CHE COLE
See "Kye Kye Kule" below

****
CHICKAMA CHICKAMA CRANEY CROW (Version #1)
Performance Instructions given in italics:
Children pretending to be chickens stand facing the witch. The witch stands in front of them. The chickens say this first verse in unison in a taunting manner.

Chickens
Chickama Chickama craney crow.
Went to the well to wash her toes.
When she got back, one of her chicks was gone.
What time is it Mrs. Witch? *
Witch 8 o'clock [the witch says an arbitrary number]
Chickens What time is it Mrs. Witch?
Witch 3 o'clock [the witch says an arbitrary number]
Chickens What time is it Mrs. Witch?
Witch 3 o'clock [the witch says an arbitrary number]
Chickens What time is it Mrs. Witch?
Witch 10 o'clock [the witch says an arbitrary number]

[This pattern continues for as long as the designated witch wants it to until this part ]
Chickens What time is it Mrs. Witch?
Witch 12 o'clock!!

[When the witch says 12 o'clock, the chickens scatter and try to run to a previously designated "home base" that is across the yard or large room. The witch tries to tag as many chickens as she can. When they are tagged, the chickens are supposed to stop running and go to the witch's side of the yard or room to watch the rest of the action. [alternatively, the chickens who are tagged can help the witch catch the rest of the chickens, but I don't like the message this gives of children turning on their "family members"]. The last person who is tagged is the new witch. *A boy would be "Mr. Witch".
-Azizi P; adapted in 1999; from "Hawk & Chicken's Play"; Talley's Negro Folk Rhymes

Editor:
This is a modified version of a very old children's game. A version of this game is found in Thomas W. Talley's 1922 collection Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise And Otherwise (Kennnikat Press Edition, 1968; p. 74).
Here's the game as it was included in the "Children's Play" section of that book:

Hawk And Chickens Play
(Chicken's Call) Chickamee chickamee, cranie-crow
I went to de well to wash my toe.
W'en I came back, my chicken wus gone.
W'at time, ole Witch?
(Hawk Sponse) "One"
Hawk Call) "I wants a chick"
Chicken's Sponse "Well, you cain't git mine".
(Hawk Call) "I shall have a chick!"
(Chicken's Sponse) "You shan't have a chick!"
-snip-
I think that Talley’s version of this game is incomplete. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the play activity continued after that last words with "the witch" chasing "the chickens".

My Modifications Of This Old Game:
In order that urban children would be able to understand the "story" of the rhyme, I changed the "hawk" to a "chicken". When I shared taught this game to groups of children, I explained to them that I wasn't certain what "chickama chickama craney crow" meant. For some vague reason, I think "craney" means "smart" (perhaps from the Scottish word "ken"). I told them this, and also told them that these lines might mean "grandma chicken" or it could mean "chickens, my chickens [said] granny crow". I told them that if I found out what that line really meant, I'd let them know. If any Cocojams readers have any idea what this line means, please share it with me and other readers.

Initially, I taught this rhyme with a mother hen who was to say the first verse alone and with her chickens standing in a vertical line behind her. Theoretically, the "mother hen" was supposed to help her chickens get safely to "home base". However, in practice, I found this didn't work out well, since the 1. you had to go through a step of picking a mother (or father) hen and 2. the mother hen just ran to home base and didn't "protect" her children from the witch and 3. All the children wanted to do was run to home base anyway so adding the steps of choosing a mother {or father hen} and reminding them to help the other "chickens" seemed wasted efforts.

With regard to choosing when the witch says "12 o'clock": I suggested to the child who is designated as the witch not to repeat this sequence more than 5 times since I found that the children would get too bored and restless beyond that number.

I wasn't surprising that the children liked the chasing part the best. The fact that they don't know when they will have to run. Since they don't know when the "witch" will say "12' o clock", that means that they have to stay ready & alert. This is still a good survival skill to learn.

"Call & Sponse" in the Talley example means "call & response". See what I believe is another modified version of this rhyme on this website of Halloween songs: http://www.teach-nology.com/worksheets/misc/halloween/songs/songs/1/ That version is called "Old Witch, Old Witch" and starts with this verse:

Chicken my chicken my creamy crow,
I went to the well to wash my toe,
When I got there the water was low,
What time is it, Old Witch, Old Witch?
What time is it Old Witch?
-snip-
Unlike my version, there's no mention in that "Old Witch Old Witch" rhyme of any running/chasing activity.

****
CHICKAMA CHICKAMA CRANEY CROW (Version #2)
Here's an excerpt of recollection of Jack and Rosa Maddox's recollection of slavery that includes a mention of "Chickama Chickama Craney Crow":

My first real hard work was gathering brush in the fields. Life was pretty hard. There was a cowhide to get you every time you turned your head out of time. They got us up for the fields before day. We used to go to the fields singin' - Chicama - chicama craney - crow Went to the well to wash my toe When I got back all my chickens was gone. It's one o'clock old witch" We had a overseer. He thought three o'clock the time to get up.
-
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ewyatt/_borders/Texas%20Slave%2... (Retrieved July 19, 2007)

****
CHICAMY (Version #3 of Chicka Ma Chicka Ma etc)
Chicamy
Chicamy, chickamy, chimey O, Down to the pond to wash their feet; Bring them back to have some meat, Chickamy, chickamy, chimey O.

The children sing the first line as they go round and round. At the second line they move down the road a little, and turn round and round as they end the rhyme.
—Crockham Hill, Kent (Miss Chase).
http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/traditional-games-1/traditional-games-... The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland & Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 1 ; retrieved November 9, 2010

Editor: This entry serves as documentation that "Chica Ma Chica Ma Craney Crow" is probably an African American version of game from the United Kingdom.

****
CHICKIDY HAND
Chickidy Hand
Chickidy hand,
Chickidy hand, The Warner, my Cock, Crows at four in the morning.

Several boys, placing their clasped fists against a lamp-post, say these lines, after which they run out, hands still clasped. One in the middle tries to catch as many as possible, forming them in a long string, hand in hand, as they are caught. Those still free try to break through the line and rescue the prisoners. If they succeed in parting the line, they may carry one boy pig-a-back to the lamp-post, who becomes "safe." The boy caught last but one becomes " it " in the next game.—Deptford, Kent (Miss Chase). http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/traditional-games-1/traditional-games-... The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland & Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 1 ; retrieved November 9, 2010

Editor: This game is probably related to the Chicamy game provided above.

****
COMING DOWN WITH A BUNCH OF ROSES
Caribbean children dance "Coming Down With A Bunch Of Roses" in parallel kines of facing partners. A single player dances down and back between the lines; the chosen partner leads the next round.

Solo: Annie, Annie,
Group: Coming down with a bunch of roses,
Coming down.

Solo: You walk in style.
Group: Coming down with a bunch of roses,
Coming down.

[Other soloist lines] *

You show me your dress [etc., as above]
You show me your [hat, watch, hair, dress, slip, friend etc]
You dance the rhumba
You choose your partner.
-children at San Juan Girls' Government School; San Juan Trinidad. Alan Lomax, J. D. Elder, and Bess Lomax Hawes. Brown Girl In The Ring" (New York: Pantheon Press, 1997) and song #8, Rounder CD 1716, 1997 #

Editor: I included the word in brackets to further clarify the editors' words [etc. as above]

The video "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O" that is embedded below under "Pizza Pizza Daddy O (Version #3) demonstrates the parallel lines/"Soul Train like" manner of playing this game

The title & refrain "Coming Down With A Bunch Of Roses" undoubtedly came from the chantey (sailing song) "Come Down, Ye Bunch of Roses". Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_reiLUTDSRc&feature=related and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xIv9FSQ_gWY for YouTube sound clips of that song.

The words to "Come Down Ye Bunch Of Roses were posted by MMario on 17 Dec 02 - 02:44 PM in this Mudcat Discussion Forum thread: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=54759 Songs of the Sailor and Lumberjack

****
CONGOTAY
Congotay! Congotay! A Global History of Caribbean Food
books.google.com/books?isbn=0765642174

Candice Goucher - 2013 - ‎History

The Enslaved Africans Kitchen p. 67
“On the island of Tobago Congotay is a simple tag-and-capture team game in which half the children are chickens and half are attackers. The attackers try to get past the female leader , “the greedy mama:, to capture her chickens for their side. First recorded by J.D. Elder in 1936, the Congotay song and dance is still remembered in various parts of the Caribbean, where the children’s laughter punctuates the lines of the song

One day, one day
Congotay!
I meet an ol' lady,
Congotay!
With a box of chickens,
Congotay!
I ask her for one,
Congotay!
She did not give me,
Congotay!
She’s a greedy mama
Congotay!"

-snip-
Another version of this game is also given in Cocojams' Caribbean Folk Songs page.

****
DRAW ME A BUCKET OF WATER (Version #1)
(Georgia Sea Islands singing game)

Draw Me a Bucket of Water
Draw me a bucket of water
For my lady’s daughter
We got none [one, two, three, four] in the bunch
We’re all [three, two, one] out the bunch
You go under, sister Sally.
Frog in the bucket and I can’t get him out
Frog in the bucket and I can’t get him out
Frog in the bucket and I can’t get him out.
Frog in the bucket and I can’t get him out.
- http://brooklynmusic.wordpress.com/2009/12/06/draw-me-a-bucket-of-water-...
Editor:
"Draw Me a Bucket of Water" is a game song from The United Kingdom. See the entries below for two examples of "Draw Me A Bucket Of Water" from http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/traditional-games-1/traditional-games-... The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland & Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 1

This particular version of "Draw Me A Bucket Of Water", and the others listed on this page that mention "Sister Sally" and/or "Frog in the bucket and I can't get him out" are from the African American traditions of the Gullah people of the Georgia Sea Islands. Foremost among the people we can thank for keeping these versions alive is African American folklorist and author Bessie Jones.

"Draw Me A Bucket Of Water" is included in the album "Put Your Hand On Your Hip, and Let Your Backbone Slip: Songs and Games from the Georgia Sea Islands" by Bessie Jones. That song is also included in the book "Step It Down: Games, Plays, Songs, and Stories from the Afro-American Heritage" by Bessie Jones & Bess Lomax Hawes.

African American folklorist Zora Neal Hurston mentions observing African American children in Florida playing "Draw Me A Bucket Of Water" in her now classic book 1935 "Mules And Men". African American Blues singer Taj Mahal also included the song "Draw Me A Bucket of Water" on his 1997 children's album "Shakin' a TailFeather."

It's interesting to learn that some music elementary school teachers are acquainting their students with the song and movements to "Draw Me A Bucket Of Water". However, I'm not sure if children play this game of their own initiative, or whether it just lives on in music classes in a few schools.

Here's a comment about a video of this game that, unfortunately, is no longer available: http://brooklynmusic.wordpress.com/2009/12/06/draw-me-a-bucket-of-water-...

P. Conrad on December 6, 2009
"Here’s a nice little video on School Tube with students at a Knoxville, TN school demonstrating the game from Bessie Jones’ classic collection Step It Down: Games, Plays, Songs, and Stories from the Afro-American Heritage.

I never saw it end with that counted-down “dismount.” Usually the dancers turn one direction in a “bunch” and then loosen up and hold hands in a open circle of four so they can really fly around in the opposite direction (and maybe fall on the floor)."

-snip-

Here are performance instructions about this singing game that were posted by Deborah Jeter on http://www.newtunings.com/kidmid/DrawMeABucket.html

"This is a rope-pulling song.

The pairs of children are scattered in shared space. Number the children 1 - 4 so they will know the order they are to "go under".

For the phrases 1-3:

1.Partners join hands, moving alternate arms forward and back. Each partner always has one arm extended and one elbow which is bent and close to the body. This is called oppositional are movement.

2.Two pairs make a set of four. One pair stands in place while another pair joins hands above them. All four do the oppositional arm movement with their partners.

For the fourth phrase:

3. On the words, "You go under, sister Sally," Child 1 (who is the partner of child 3) ducks under the arms of children 2 and 4.

Eventually the children will all be "under" another's arms in this woven position.

On the chorus:

"Frog in the bucket and I can't get him out", the child wriggle in place, which causes much giggling because the movement of one is matched against the movement of another and there is a loss of control of sorts in their own jiggling movement."

****
DRAW ME A BUCKET OF WATER (Version #2)
A slightly different version appears in The Little Mother Goose (1912):

Draw a pail of water
For my lady’s daughter;
My father’s a king, and my mother’s a queen,
My two little sisters are dressed in green,
Slumping grass and parsley,
Marigold leaves and daisies.
One rush! Two rush!
Pray thee, fine lady, come under my rush*.

*A rush is a dense growth of shrubs or plants.
-P. Conrad http://brooklynmusic.wordpress.com/2009/12/06/draw-me-a-bucket-of-water-... ; December 6, 2009

Here's a YouTube video of a similarly worded version of "Draw A Bucket Of Water"

gdozet | November 24, 2008

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DRAW ME A BUCKET OF WATER (Version #3)
Draw me a bucket of water
for my only duagter
theres one in the pot
and 3 out the pot
and you go under sisster sally.
Draw me a bucket of water
for my only daughter
theres 2 in the pot
and 2 out the pot
you go under sisster sally.
Draw me a bucket of water
for my only daughter
theres 3 in the pot
1 out the pot
you go under sister sally.
Draw me a bucket of water
for my only daughter
theres 4 in the pot
and none out the pot
you go under sisster sally.

Frog in the bucket
and we camt get them out frog
in the bucket and we cant get them out.YEAHHH1
- Guest, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25367&messages=7 ; History of 'Draw a Bucket of Water' (kids' game) ; November 8, 2010

Visit that web site for additional versions of this African American play party song.

Here's a YouTube video of childen singing and playing a version "Draw Me A Bucket Of Water"
ASD Gr 1 & 2 Concert: Draw me a Bucket of Water

asdubai00 | May 26, 2009
Grade 1 & 2 Concert 2

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DRAW A PAIL OF WATER (Version #4 of Draw Me A Bucket Of Roses)
Draw a pail of water *
Put it in a chestnut tree,
And let it stay an hour.
One of you rush, two may rush,
Please, old woman, creep under the bush;
The bush is too high, the bush is too low,
Please, old woman, creep under the bush.
—Hampshire (Miss Mendham) ; http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/traditional-games-1/traditional-games-... ; The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland & Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 1 ; retrieved November 8, 2010

* "Draw a pail of water" is given as the title for this page. However , I'm assuming that this line is also spoken for this particular example of this game song.

Editor: Through the wonders of Google, I've just learned abou this wonderful website whose link is provided above. I intend to spend many hours reading that site, and highly recommend it to others who are interested in children's playground rhymes and game songs.

****
DRAW ME A BUCKET OF WATER (Version #5)
Draw a bucket of water
For the farmer's daughter;
Give a gold ring and a silver watch,
Pray, young lady, pop under.
—Sporle, Norfolk (Miss Matthews) ; http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/traditional-games-1/traditional-games-... ; The Traditional Children's Games of England Scotland & Ireland In Dictionary Form - Volume 1 ; retrieved November 8, 2010

Editor: This example is listed as # IX. Six other examples of this game song are provided on the website whose link is given above. Included in that number is the example listed on this page as Draw A Pail Of Water (Version #4 of Draw Me A Bucket Of Water"). My acknowledgment and sincere thanks to the editors of that site!

E,F
FROGGY (Version #1)
Play instructions: Participants stand in a circle. This is a call & response song with the group repeating each words and actions of a designated person. The song begins with all the participants clapping their hands and then clapping their knees. This established the beat of the song. After doing that for a few times, the Caller then starts the song. The hand clap/knee clapping motions may be continued throughout or some other motions may be substituted for that beat as described in the brackets.

Dog

Dog Cat

Dog Cat Mouse

FROGGIE!

Itsy bitsy teenie weenie itty bitty froggie [Caller sings the words while moving rhythmically to the beat. When she finishes singing, the group sings and imitates her (or his) words.

Jump jump jump, you little froggie [Caller sings the words while taking small hopping motions foward to the beat of the song. When she finishes the group says the words while also hopping forward]

Fleas and spiders, oh so delicious. (Caller sings the words and imitates a motion of spiders moving with her or his hands, and rubs her belly on the word "delicious". After she finishes, the group sings and does the same motions.]

Ribbit Ribbit Ribbit Crow! [The Caller sings these words and takes jumping or hopping steps back to her position in the circle's ring. After she finishes, the group sings and does the same motions.]

The song repeats louder, faster, slower, softer etc. [For instance, the Caller says the word "Faster!" and the group repeats that before the Caller begins the song over again with a faster tempo,]
-Camp song, this version from Lillian Taylor Camp, Kingsley Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, late 1980s

Editor:
I believe that "Froggie" is an off-shoot of the large "Frog In The Well" family of songs. The "crow" word at end of this song marks the demise of the frog as usually happens in these songs. Among those songs are “Frong Went A Courting”, “Keemo Kimo” and “King Kong Kitchie”. It’s my position that the handclap rhyme "Down By The Banks bb rhymes are also a contemporary branch of that “Frog In The Well” family of songs. Click fhttp://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes or numerous versions of "Down By The Banks Of The Hanky Panky".

****
FROGGY (Version #2)
Dog
Dog Cat
Dog Cat Mouse
FROGGIE!
Itsy bitsy teenie weenie tiny little froggie
Jump froggie, jump you little froggie
Gooble on up the little worms and spider
Fleas and spiders are scrumpdelilicious
Ribbit Ribbit Ribbit Crow!

Faster!
- greenghoulie; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqTIqHne_cI&feature=related ; December 15, 2008

Here's that video:

Froggy, Part I

Bryan and Pete performing the classic (or soon to be classic) camp song: Froggy (part 1)!

-snip-
This camp song is often prefaced by the caller saying "This is a repeat after me song". The group then says "This is a repeat after me song". The caller then says "So let's go."
And the group repeats "So let's go", After this, the song actually begins.

G, H
Editor: Gigalo is a movement rhyme game that has the same lyric structure as foot stomping cheers* but not the same performance activity (stepping routine) as (other) foot stomping cheers.

* Foot stomping chants have a group/consecutive lyrical structure. What this means is that the chant begins with the group, includes a soloist portion, and immediately begins again from the beginning with a new soloist. This pattern continues until everyone in the group has had one turn as the soloist.

Perhaps Gigalo is a movement rhyme that marks the earliest form of foot stomping cheers - a playground movement rhyme that is performed without the consistent stepping routine of later foot stomping cheers.

Click http://cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 for information and examples of foot stomping cheers.

Examples of Gigalo are given without regard to the spelling of the title.

I believe that the word "gigalo" comes from the word "jackalo". That word is found in the British children's playground rhyme "High, Low, Jackalo" (also known as High Low Peccalow" and similarly spelled word. "High Low Jackalow" comes from the card game "High Low Jack" which is also called "Pitch" and other names. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for examples of the handclap rhyme "High Low Jackalow" ("High Low Peccalow").

GIGALO (Version #1)
All: Gig ah lo-o
Gig gig a lo-o
Gig ah lo-o
Gig gig a lo-o
Group: Hey, Kayla
Kayla: What?
Group: Are you ready to gig?
Kayla: Gig what?
Group: Gigalo
Kayla : My hands up high
My feet down low
And this is the way
I gig a lo *
Group: Her hands up high
Her feet down low
And this is the way she gigalos

{repeat from the beginning with the next soloist, and continue until everyone in the group has a turn as soloist}
-T.M.P.; memories of Pittsburgh, PA; mid to late 1980s, collected by Azizi Powell in the 1980s & transcribed from an audio tape.

*The soloist briefly does a fancy step routine. The rest of the group then does the same routine along with the soloist. At the end of this rendition of this cheer, the cheer starts again from the beginning with the next soloist. The expectation is that each girl will do a different step or dance movement. This pattern continues until every member of the group has a turn as the soloist.

Editor:
I first saw "Gigalo" performed in the mid to late 1980s in Pittsburgh, PA. The performers were my daughter and her friends. They were elementary school age to middle school age. Gigalo is one of the few foot stomping cheers from the 1980s that I still see being performed today (in 2010). I should note that the neighborhood where I saw this cheer being performed in the 1980s and in the 2000s are the same {Pittsburgh's East Liberty/Garfield section}. The words of the cheer that I first collected in 1980 remained the same in 2000s. However, as the examples on this page document, other words have been added to this cheer.

It should also be noted that there has been a slight change in performance of this cheer from the late 1980s to 1990s. in some of the 2000s performances of this cheer and other cheers the girl whose turn it was to be soloist moved up from the horizontal line to stand facing the audience in front of the rest of the girls. These performances were usually in informal after-school settings when I visited by school teacher daughter (my original source for this rhyme) and asked her students and other children if they could show me any handclap or foot stomping 'songs' they know.

I should note that I'm not sure how to spell the word "gigalo". It actually is pronounced more like "Jig ah low". But I got into the habit of spelling it "gigalo". I'm not sure if the examples that which are featured here adopted my spelling or if that was the spelling that the people sending in the example would have used anyway. This is one of the problems with transcribing from the oral tradition, and then posting the example on the Internet.

Gigalo is one of the few foot stomping cheers that I collected from the mid to late 1980s that I've confirmed is still being done (as of June 2010) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. As is the case with several other Cocojams cheers and rhymes, a number of the examples reposted here are from a specific thread that I started on http://mudcat.org/threads.cfm

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for examples of "High Low Peccalo, and "High Low Jackalow", handclap rhymes that have the same "hands up high/feet down low" words as "Gigalo".

The card game “High Low Jack” which was very popular in the 19th century and is still popular is most likely the source of the hand clapping game “High Low Jackalow” and the foot stomping/movement rhyme “Gigalo” (or “Jigalo”). Other names for the “High Low Jack” card game are “Pitch”, “All Fours”, Old Sledge etc .

****
GIGOLO (Version #2)
Gig-olo-o
Gig-Gig-olo-o
Gig-olo-o
Gig-gig-olo-o
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah!
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah
Group: Are you ready to Gigolo?
Girl: Well, my hands up high,
my feet down low
and thats the way
I gigolo (does dance/motion of her own)
Group: Well, her hands up high,
her feet down low
and thats the way
she gigolos (group repeats the unique dance/motion)

(Repeat with a new girl and new dance/motion.)
-flojaune G {African American female college student; memories of Pittsburgh, PA; 2000}; email to Azizi Powell; 2005

Editor:
Thanks, Flojaune! Flojaune described this as "a handclap/foot stomping cheer". I also received the exact same version of this cheer from Tonya T., 28 year old; African American female; {Crawfordville Ga; 2005} Thanks, Tonya!

****
GIGGALO (Version #3)
I was just browsing this site, and one of the choices that caught my eye was the "foot stomping cheers". Me still being in my last teenage year, I clearly remember doing them. As I was reading, the ones posted are some I've never heard of, but I wanted to share those that I did know. I did some of these in about 1995 or 96.

[Words to Giggalo]:

Giggalo Gigg-alo gigg,
gigg-alo gigg-alo gigg, gigg-alo
Hey {girl's name}
{girl responds}Yeah
Are you ready?
{girl responds}To what?
To gigg
{girl responds}Gigg what?
Giggalo
{girl responds} Well... My hands up high
My feet down low
And this the way I giggalo
{girl will do dance}
I turn around
And touch the ground
And get back up and break it down.
- Becky H.; 5/1/2006

****
GIGALO (Version #4)
we have our hands up high
feet down low
thats the way we gig-alo.
gig alo o gig gig alo o
gi alo o gig gig alo
the sky is blue
the grass is green
thats the way we do our thing
turn around touch the ground
get back up and break it down.
gig alo o gig gig alo o
gig alo o gig gig alo o
-erika; 10/26/2006

****
JIGALOW (Version #5 of Gigalo)
my friend taught me this.
my hands up high
my knees down low
but this the way i jigalow
the sky is blue
the grass is green
and this the way I do my thing
your daddy cook
your momma bake
but this the way my booty shake
-No name; 2/15/2007

****
GIGALO (Version #6)
Gigolo, Gig-Gig-Olooo,
Gigolo, Gig-Gig-olo
Hey [team member]!
[girl picked answers] Hey WHAT?
Show us how you gigolo!
[girl picked] My hands up high,
my feet down low,
and this is how i gigolo. [does a dance]
-Jane; 8/23/2007

****
GIGALOO (Version #7)
Hey Kolika
[person] hey what?
are u ready?
to what?
to Gig..
Gig what?
ALOO READY GO
My hand are high
my feet are low
and this is how i gigaloo.. [clap]
GIGALOO GIG GIG ALLO
SAY WHAT?
GIG ALOOO
GIG GIG ALLOOO
-Kimalea ; 11/13/2007

****
JIG ALOO (Version #8 of Gigalo)
this is a cheer i heard once. me an mi friends do it to be silly!

{1} Hey ______?
{2} Hey what?
{1} You ready?
{2} For what?
{1} To jig!
{2} Jig what?!
{1} ALOOOOOO!
{BOTH} My back aches
my bra's too tight
my hips shake from left to right,
my hands up high
my feet down low
and this is how i jigalo!
{while clapping hands} JIG ALOO JIG ALOO JIG ALOO JIGALOOOO!
-Leslie ; 11/28/2007

****
JIGALLO (Version #9)
First: Hey [Name],
Can ya jig?
Second: Jig what?
First: Jigallo!
Second: Weeeeeeeell I got my hands up high
and my feet down low *does dance*
and that’s the way I jigallo!

*repeat until bored*
[I am white. I learned this in a majority African American school.]
-Liz; 9/24/2008

Editor:
As a reminder, for the folkloric record, I encourage people who send in examples to include demographical information, including the race/s and/or ethnicity* of those people who perform/ed the example. While you do not have to include this information, doing so helps me and other folklorist document whether particular types of rhymes & cheers may be known to specific populations within the same country, and elsewhere and whether those examples have the same or similar words and or performed the same or differently.

Thanks, Liz for sending in that demographical information!

****
JIGGALO (Version #10)
This is how it goes in Midway, Georgia.)
Jiggalo, Jig, Jigggg----alooooo.
Jiggalo, Jig, Jigggg----alooooo.
Group: Hey _____!
Person: Yeah?
Group: Are you ready?
Person: For what?
Group: To Jig!
Person: Jig what?
Group: Jigalooo! Jigalooo!
Person: Well, my back aches
My bra (belt, pants, Dickies) to tight.
My booty shake from left to right.
With the sky up high
And my J's down low
This the way I Jiggalo (does a cute, short dance)
Group: Well, her back aches
Her bra (belt, pants, Dickies) to tight.
Her booty shake from left to right.
Wit the sky up high
And her J's down low
And this the way she Jiggalo (copies their cute, short dance)
(Repeats with new person)
-Brianna; 9/26/2008

Editor:
"Dickies" are a type of plain shirt & pants in one solid color that were originally worn by working people like a uniform. In the 1990s, these shirts & pants became quite popular for teens and younger children, and now I understand there are also dickie shorts.
I think "J's" mean "jeans" and this line refers to the custom of "sportin a sag" (wearing pants that are too big and therefore sag so that you can sometimes see the top of the person's underwear.)

In order for the group to know whether to say bra, belt, pants, Dickies, it would seem to me that they would have to agree on one and say that one item without switching to another one throughout that entire cheer performance.

****
GIGALO (Version #11)
At girl scout summer camp this was our version:

group: hey ____ (name of person)?
xxxxx: yeah?
leader: are you ready?
xxxxx: for what?
leader: to jigalow!!
xxxxx: my head hurt, my bra too tight,
i shake my booty
from the left to the right.
i got my hands up high
my feet down low
and thats the way I jigalow.
jig-ah-low, jig, jig-ah-low (2x)
-Guest, -ray =) ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45; Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers; February 17, 2010

****
GIGALO (Version #12)
this is the way i learned it!!!

group: gig-alo, gig-gig-alo, say what?,
gig-alo, gig-gig-alo,
we say yo _____(persons name)
person: hey what
group: are you ready?
person: for what?
group: to gig!
person: gig what?
group: gigalo!
person: OH!!! my hands up high (puts arms up in the air),
my feet down low (puts arms down towards the ground),
and this is how i gigalo (does his/her own dance move)
group: his/her hands up high (puts arms up in the air),
his/her feet down low (puts arms down towards the ground),
and this is how he/she gigalo (repeats persons dance move)

repeat the whole thing with another person in the group. the person who just went calls the next name... and so on
-Guest, jules, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45; Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers; February 9, 2009

****
Editor: This version of "Gigalo" was adapted for use by a Christain youth group.

GIGALO (Version #13)
This is how I learned it.

leader: hey ____ (name of group)?
group: hey what?
leader: are you ready?
group: for what?
leader: to jig.
group: jig what?
leader: Jigalow!
group: oh, yeah!
leader: lets see it then!
group: well my hands up high
my feet down low
and thats the way I jigalow.
jig-ah-low, jig, jig-ah-low (2x)
leader: hey _____ (name of group)?
group: hey what?
leader: are you ready?
group: for what?
leader: to jig!
group: jig what?
leader: jigalow!
all: REMIX!!!
group: well my hands up high
my feet down low
and thats the way
I get to know my Jesus,
yeah, yeah, my Jesus. What?
My Jesus, yeah, yeah, my Jesus!!!
-Guest,K, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45; Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers;March 16, 2009

****
JIG-A-LOW(Version #14)
Leader-Are you Ready?
Girl 1-For what???
Leader-To JIG!
Girl 1-Jig? ...Jig WHAT?
All- A- LOOOOOOOWWWWWW!!!
Leader-
WELL...
My head hurt,
my bra too tight,
I shake my hips from left too right.
I got my hands up high
my feet down low
and that's the way I Jig-A-Low.
Jig-A-Loww!
Jig-Jig A-LOWWWWWW
My head up high
my feet down low
and that's da way me Jig-A-Low!
Jig-Jig-JIG-JIG A LOWWWWWW!
I call my friends
I call mah ma
I talk and talk and TALK...
Cuz' dats the way I.....
JIG-A-LOW!!
Jig-A-Low
Jig-Jig-Jig-Jig-Jig..
A-LOW!

:) Really hope this helps :P
- Guest, School Rhyme Master ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45; Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers; May 16, 2010

Editor:
Click that link for two other versions decidedly more risque versions of this cheer that were also posted by Guest, School Rhyme Master.

****
GIGALO (Version #15)
here is the real version ppl.

HEY(Girls name)
Girl:what?
ME: are you ready to jigalo?
girl:yeah!
Both: my hands up high!
My feet down low!
This is the way I jigalo!
jig-a-low
jig-jig-a-looow
jig-a-low
jig-jig-a-looow

(you keep repeating until you get bored. You also do a little dance :) hoped this helped~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
-Guest, meesha ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45
Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers ; May 17, 2010

****
GIGALO (Version #16 & #17)
This is a handclap/foot stomping cheer called Gigolo.
Gig-olo-o
Gig-Gig-olo-o
Gig-olo-o
Gig-gig-olo-o
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah!
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: what.?!
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: Well, my hands up high,
my feet down low
and thats the way I gigolo (does dance/motion of her own)
Group: Well, her hands up high,
her feet down low and thats the way she gigolos

(group repeats the unique dance/motion)
(Repeat with a new girl and new dance/motion.)

OOOORRR:

Gig-olo-o
Gig-Gig-olo-o
Gig-olo-o
Gig-gig-olo-o
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah!
Group: Hey [girls name]
Girl: Yeah
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: what.?!
Group: show us how yuh get down.!
Girl: Well my back aint right
my bra too tight
my hips keep shakin from left to right
and THATS the way I gigolo (does dance/motion of her own)
Group: Well my back aint right my bra too tight my hips keep shakin from left to right and THATS the wa she gigolos(group repeats the unique dance/motion)

(Repeat with a new girl and new dance/motion.)
-Guest, 17yr old kid at heart:); http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300&messages=171 ; Children's Street Songs; July 20, 2010

****
GIGALO (Version #18)
My friend taught this to me.
[All stand in circle]
[All] Gig-olo, Gig gig-olo
[Someone goes into the middle] My hands up high
my feet down low
and this is how I gigolo.
[All] My hands up high
my feet down low
and this is how I gigolo

[All people outside circle copies the dance that that someone did in the middle]
[Repeat, and each time you repeat, someone else goes in the middle]
-Guest, Ian; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100807&messages=45 Gigalo & other children's rhymes &cheers; July 23, 2010

Editor:
It's interesting to learn that this cheer is performed in a circle. I've not seen any foot stomping cheer performed in a circle in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. Usually, the foot stomping cheers that I've seen in that city are performied by girls standing in a horizontial line or a semi-circle, and a verticle line only for a few specific cheers.

This circle formation suggests that foot stomping cheers evolved from show-me-your motion ring (circle) games. In those games one person in the middle of the circle had to do a dance or some other movement and the rest of the group had to then try to exactly imitate that movement along with the middle person. The middle person then either purposely or randomly selected a new middle person, the former middle person rejoined the rest of the group, and the game immediately began again.

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers to find a cheerleader cheer example of "Gigalo", meaning one that includes the name of an athletic team. Also, Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes to find a version of "Gigalo" in combined with the rhyme "Down Down Baby, I Know Karate".

****
GIRLS GO TO MARS
We used to go around the playground with our arms linked and singing,

"Girls go to Mars
to get more candybars,
boys go to Jupiter
to get more stupider"

And we also would say, "anybody in the way gets a five cent kick and a ten cent Boom!" and we would kick out our legs on "kick" and bring up our knee on "boom". It sounds so awful now!!!
-Guest, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350&messages=221
I'm Rubber. You're Glue: Children's Rhymes; 11/29/2006

Editor:
"Girls are from Mars/Boys are from Jupiter" is a floating verse that is found in a number of handclap rhymes. I'm interested to learn that it was used as a "get out of the way" chant. See "Beware" on this page for another example of a get out of the way chant.

****
GOING ROUND THE MOUNTAIN, TWO BY TWO
Going round the mountain, two by two.
Going round the mountain, two by two.
Going round the mountain, two by two.

Tell me who loves sugar and candy.
Let me see your motion, two by two.
Let me see your motion, two by two.
Let me see your motion, two by two.

We can do you motion. two by two.
We can do you motion. two by two.
We can do you motion. two by two.
Tell me who loves sugar and candy.
-Traditional African American game song, various sources; posted by Azizi 2004

Editor: (updated comments-April 30, 2009)
"Going Round The Mountain, Two by Two" is a traditional African American "show me your motion" ring game (circle game). One of the books that included this game was Children's Games From Many Lands. The game was attributed to the American South.

According to that book, this game was played by girls and boys together. The performance directions in that book describe the children forming a circle without holding hands. One person stands in the middle of the circle while the rest of the group chants in unison, claps their hands, and moves to the song's rhythm. On the words "let me see your motion", the person in the middle performs a dance step or some other movement. The group then tries to exactly imitate that movement. The song usually continues with the group saying "Who do you choose?" Traditionally, the middle player would purposefully choose another player (usually if the middle player was a boy, he would choose a girl or vice versa).

I don't recall playing “Going Round The Mountain” during my childhood {Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s}. I also don't recall ever observing any children engaging in self-directed play that included this song in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where I've lived since 1969. I wrote “self-directed play” because I’ve taught “Going Round The Mountain” to coed groups of girls (ages 5-12 years) and boys (ages 5-7 years) who participated in summer or after-school groups that I facilitated from 1997-2005. The different ages for girls and boys reflect the fact that boys over the age of 7 years rarely participated in these game song sessions. I found that these children knew very few singing circle games. One exception to that observation was "Going To Kentucky" (see below).

When I played "show me your motion" circle games as a child, the middle person was always chosen at random. This is how African American children in Pittsburgh, PA in the late 20th century to date {2009} are still choosing the next middle person.

Here's how the next middle person is selected: At a specific point in the song, the middle player closes ”her” (or his eyes) and covers her eyes with one hand. While still in the center of the circle, the middle person turns around, pointing at random to the other players who form the circle. When the song ends, the person the middle player is pointing to is the new middle person. The former middle person then quickly re-joins the other players and the song begins again.

Traditionally, these types of games didn't end until everyone has had a turn in the middle of the circle. However, nowadays, when the children get tired of playing that particular song, they move on to another song. That is, if children even playing these games at all. I'm curious why selecting the person in the middle changed from purposely picking that new middle person to a random selection process.

Initially, a considerable number of the hildren who attended the game song groups I facilitated were afraid of being selected as the middle person. I think this was because they were unused to being the center of attention, and they were afraid that they would be teased. This fear of being teased was well founded. However, my groups had a "no teasing" rule. One of the best outcomes of those groups was that over a period of time [two of these groups met once a week for three years], some of the shyest, most fearful of being teased children were eager to be selected to be in the middle. These children not only reinforced their self-esteem and self-confidence but learned that they could count on their peers to treat them respectfully.

Here are other reasons why choosing the middle person may have changed in some communities from a purposeful act to a random act.

1. the game was at one time a way of signaling to the community and your peers who you liked romantically [middle girl choosing boy and vice versa] Of course, this theory would hold true if these games were played by teens and young adults, the same population which played 'play party' songs.

and

2. the random selection may have helped to put a stop to favoritism that occurred when the person in the middle only selected those children who were the most popular. When you never know who is going to be picked and when, this puts all children on an equal footing.

Editorial Comment: The Benefits of Random Selection Of The Middle Person In Children's Circle Games
Maintaining an attitude of expectant readiness and being able to think quickly and creatively are cognitive skills and survival skills that are important skills for children to develop and reinforce today. I believe that random selection of the middle person can help children develop and reinforce these skills.

When the middle player is chosen at random, players never know when they will be picked to go into the middle of the ring. Therefore, every player has to be ready to quickly take his or her turn as the middle person. The middle person is also expected to perform a different 'motion' or perform the same motion slightly differently than anyone else has done before him or her. Therefore children learn that they need to think ahead and have a "Plan A" and a "Plan B" in case someone 'takes their move'.

This practice of selecting a different movement [often a dance step with older, or more confident children] lives on in various foot stomping cheers that I collected from the 1980s, but that's a whole 'nuther subject.

[Note: In the children's groups which I coordinated, with smaller children and some older ones, this 'rule' that the new middle person had to select a different movement' was largely suspended].

An Earlier Way Of Playing "Going Round The Mountain"?
Even though the Children's Games From Many Lands book described the performance directions for "Going round the mountain" as given in the first paragraph of this long editorial comment, I wonder if this game may have originally been played as a partner (two people) follow-the-leader promenade. Perhaps there were one or two people standing in the middle of the circle and the other couples walked or strutted around that middle person or person.

This method of playing this game makes better sense to me because of the words two by two. The idea for this playing activity seems to be reinforced by the fact that the Children's Games From Many Lands book included a drawing on that song's page of children (a boy and a girl, or two boys, or two girls) walking outdoors in a procession. I can't remember if "the couples" in that drawing were holding hands or not.

However, even if that was the original performance activity for "Going Round The Mountain", I wouldn’t dare attempt instructing contemporary groups of elementary school aged girls & boys to promenade holding hands. It’s not worth the drama when they can play the game another way.

****
GOING TO KENTUCKY (Version #1)
We’re going to Kentucky
We’re going to the fair
To see the sister Rita *
With the flowers in her hair *
[Oh] shake it sister Rita
Shake it all you can
Cause all the boys *
Are watchin you
So do the best you can

Rumble to the bottom
Rumble to the top
Turn around
And touch the ground
Until you holler
S-T-O-P **
Spells [elongate this word]
Stop.
-Various sources, including girls and boys ages 5-12 years old Alafia Children's Ensemble, Braddock, PA 1997 and Alafia Children's Ensemble, Pittsburgh, PA 1998

* Since this was a coed group, I suggested that the children say "brother Rico" when a male is picked to be the center person. I also suggested that they say "with the flowers in his hand" instead of "the flowers in her hair" - thus teaching boys that when they're grown, they should give gifts of flowers to their girlfriend, and then to their wife when they get married :o). “Brother Rico” was an arbitrary suggestion, but the name "Rico" came to my mind because it sounded similar to "Rita".

Also, when a boy is in the center, the group says "all the girls are watching you. That these children didn't know what to say when a boy became the center person points out the fact that this game was (and still is) almost always only played by girls.

** The center person does not sing. She (or he) makes the center of the circle. On the words "S-T-O-P", the person in the center 'closes' her eyes and also covers her eyes by putting her right hand over them. She then extends her left arm and begins to twirl around the center of the circle, pointing toward the other people forming the circle. The center person stops twirling around at the end of the song. The person who she is pointing to at the end of the song is the the new center person. The "old" center person quickly rejoins the circle, and the "new" center person quickly goes to stand in the center, and the game immediately begins again. Or this is ideally the way it's supposed to happen. Actually, some people who were randomly chosen to be the new center person, were shy and did not want to be the focus of attention. This meant that the game didn't flow as smoothly as it was supposed to. But there were always other people who loved taken these children's place, and eventually the rhythm of the game was reestablish itself.

**
Throughout the years since I've been collecting children's rhymes, I've seen this 'game' played by African American girls in various Pittsburgh African American neighborhoods. I've heard the girl referred to as "Sister Rita" and "Sister Reena". "Sister Rita" and "Sister Reena" are folk etymology versions of "senorita". Because there are so few Latino people in Pittsburgh, these African American children didn't know that "senorita" was a Spanish word that means "little woman".

Btw, it wasn't until I saw the examples of this game posted above that include the line "rumba to the bottom" did I realize that "rumble to the bottom" was also an example of folk etymology.

The video & lyrics for Round Da Doo Bop given in this section below give a sense of how we played this game. However, the tempo that I've heard the song sung was faster than the tempo the Round Da Doo Bop sung it.

****
I'M GOING TO THE CIRCUS (Version #2 of "Going To Kentucky") *
I'm going to the circus I'm going to the fair
To see a senorita with flowers in her hair
Shake it senorita shake it if you can
Shake it like a bowl of soup and do the best you can
Rumba to the bottom
Rumba to the top
Then turn around and turn around
Until you make an S-T-O-P STOP!

This was a girl's game mostly we would get in a circle, clap in rhythm and the 'senorita ' would dance then close her eyes and turn around until we yelled stop!
-Pogo; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350&messages=221;
I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes; 5/22/2005

****
GOING TO KENTUCKY (Version #3)
[One?] two three four.
[We're?] going to Kentucky.
We're going to the fair.
A pretty senorita
With flowers in her hair.
Shake it shake it shake it
[????]
So do the best you can.
Rumble to the bottom.
Rumble to the top.
And turn around and turn around
Until you [make it?] STOP!
- from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uH71mCJkSAY&feature=related
[transcription Azizi Powell, 12/18/2010

Here's that video:

going to kentucky

jungminseo | April 11, 2007
shake,rumble,turn around...

****
WE ARE GOING TO KENTUCKY (Version #4)

We’re going to Kentucky,
We’re going to the fair,
To see a senorita
With flower in her hair.

OH! Shake it, shake it, shake it,
Shake it all you can,
Shake it like a milkshake,
And do the best you can.

Oh rumble to the bottom,
And rumble to the top,
Turn around, turn around,
Until you make it STOP!
- jungminseo, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FP654bYpWpQ , April 25, 2007

Here's that video:

We are going to Kentucky

Uploaded by jungminseo on Apr 25, 2007

-snip-

Editor:
The "shake it like a mikshake" line is rather widespread, perhaps because it was used by the popular recording trio for children's songs "Sharon, Lois, & Bram". I first heard this line when this game song was led by an African American teacher during outdoor lunch recess at an African American elementary school in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (around 2008). So the "shake it like a milkshake" line is also used by some African Americans.

****
ROUND DA DOO BOP (Version #5 of Going To Kentucky)

Round Da Doo Bop

Uploaded by vincebates on Mar 23, 2011

I was going to Kentucky, I was going to the fair. I met a seniorita with flowers in her hair. Oh, shake it baby, shake it, shake it all you can. Shake it like a milkshake and drink it from a can. Oh, round da doo bop, one two, round da doo bop, one two. Turn around and turn around until you make a stop.

-snip-
Editor:
This is the first time that I've heard the line "round da doo bop". I like it :o)

The way this game is played is like I have seen in played by African American children in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area, except that the tempo was somewhat faster. For what it's worth, I don't remember this game from my childhood in Southern New Jersey in the 1950s.

The game song "We're Going To Kentucky" may have been adapted from the Bluegrass song by Bill Monroe "Going Back To Kentucky". Here's a link to a 1949 sound file of that song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBMiOjZWy6I

****
GREEN GREEN ROCKY ROAD (Version #1)
These are the lyrics from "Negro Songs From Alabama" by Harold Courlander (1963 Oak Publications).

Green, green, rocky road,
Some lady's green rocky road.
Tell me who you love, rocky road,
Tell me who you love, rocky road.

Minnie Town. (spoken)

Dear Miss Minnie you name's been called,
Come take a seat beside the wall,
Give her a kiss and let her go,
She'll never sit in that chair no more.
-raredance (rich r); http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27047 Green, Green Rocky Road; November 1, 2001

Editor: Here is a comment about this version from Barry Finn http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=59549 : "Harold Courlander has it like this in his 'Negro Folk Music, USA' as a ring game or a playparty song."

-snip-

Courlander's notes indicate that this song was collected from the children of Lilly
Chapel School in York, Alabama. It is also found in "Negro Songs From Alabama" by Harold Courlander. The story Courlander tells is that children sang the song to warn prostitutes that the police were coming. If that story is true, then presumably this song was also sung at other times and wasn't just a police warning song.

**
Here's an excerpt of a comment that I wrote in 2008 about this song:
This song is listed in the Play Rhymes Section of Thomas W. Talley's 1922 book Negro Folk Rhymes. Unfortunately, there is no accompanying tune. However, as I read this rhyme, I'm singing the tune to "Green Green Rocky Road" that I heard on one of Odetta's earlier records.

In the notes to his now classic book, Dr. Talley indicates that the rhymes he included in "Negro Folk Rhymes" are a samplying of those rhymes he remembered from his childhood and those rhymes that he collected from his [African American] Fisk Univesity students. Talley also writes that many of these songs were quite old when he collected them in the early, mid 1900s.

Given the words of the song, and my reading of how African American children's rhymes were played, my sense is that "Green Oak Tree! Rocky'O" was "originally" performed as a circle game with first one and then two children in the middle. Probably a girl selecting a boy and then when that song was sung again, the girl rejoins the group forming the circle, and the remaining boy then picks another girl, and so on}. My sense is that this game was probably self-initiated by children and played by children who were up to about age 12 years.

Using the words as given above {based on my reading of how African American children's rhymes were played in the early 20th century}, I believe that the group sang the first three lines, probably while holding hands and moving counter clockwise or while standing still and clapping their own hands and stomping their feet to the rhythm of the song. The person in the center probably did not join the group in singing these words. She or he may have clapped & stomped her/his feet to the beat, or just stood still while the group sang their part.

I believe that the first person in the circle sung the first quoted line, and the second person in the group sung the second quoted line.

For what it's worth, I don't believe that either this game song or "Red Light Green Light Rocky Road" as recorded by Peter Paul and Mary is presently known to African American children in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. I didn't know these songs when I was growing up in the 1950s in Atlantic City, New Jersey...
.
It's been my experience that few children in the late 20th and early 21st century have sang and played any non-competitive circle games except "Ring Around The Roses" and "Hokey Pokey". Nowadays these two games are rarely played by any girls or boys older than age 5 years. Also, these two games are usually initiated by a teacher, child care worker, mother at a birthday party, or some other adult, and not by the children themselves."
Azizi; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108439 Origins: Rocky Road Peter Paul & Mary ; February 7, 2008

-snip-

"Green Green Rocky Road" is closely associated with the verse "Hooka chuka soda cracka/does your mama chew tobacca", because that verse is included in some versions of that song. Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/text-analysis-green-green-rocky-road-hoo... for examples, videos, and comments about both of those songs.

And visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/choosing-it-rhymes for examples of the Choosing It rhymes "Acakaba Soda Cracker"

****
GREEN OAK TREE
This dance song from Thomas W. Talley's 1922 collection Negro Folk Songs, Wise and Otherwise [p. 81, Kennikat Press edition] may have been one of the sources of the children's game song "Green Green Rocky Road"

Green oak tree! Rocky'O! Green oak tree! Rocky'O!
Call dat one you loves, who it may be,
To come an' set by de side o' me.
"Will you hug 'im once an' kiss 'em twice?
"W'y! I wouldn't kiss 'im once fer to save 'is life!"
Green oak tree! Rocky'O! Green oak tree! Rocky'O!

-snip-

"Green Oak Tree" may have been based on the English game song "Walking On The Green Grass".

[That rhyme is posted below]
-Azizi; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27047 Lyr Req: Green Green Rocky Road
January 25, 2009

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GREEN SALLY UP (Version #1)
Green Sally up. Green Sally down.
Last one squat got to tear the ground.

Ole (Oh?) Miss Lucy dead and gone.
Left me here to weep and moan.

If you hate it fold your arms.
If you love it clap your hands.

Source: Disc 4 of Alan Lomax's Sounds of the South, A Musical Journey from the Georgia Sea Isles to the Mississippi Delta (Atlantic 787496-2; 1993).

Here's that video:

Mattie Garder, Mary Gardner, Jesse Lee Pratcher - Green Sally, Up

Posted by IvchoBrasil / September 13, 2009

**
"Green Sally Up" was recorded in 2000 by Moby as the song "Flowers". The title for that Moby recording may have been influenced by this very old version of the children's game song "Ring Around The Rosie":

A ring, a ring, a raney
Buttermilk and tansy,
Flower here and flower there,
And all- squat!
-Source-W. W. Newell, Games and Songs of American Children, 1883, (1903), Dover reprint).

Another old version of "Ring Around The Rosie" is posted below on this page.

Also, click http://www.cocojams.com/content/text-analysis-green-sally for my theories about why Moby titled his song "Flowers", as well as my comments about the possible connection between "Green Sally Up" and "Ring Around The Rosie", and more.

In addition, click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/309 to hear a sound file of Moby "Flowers" song.

****
GREEN SALLY UP (Version #2)
Green Sally up, Green Sally down
Green Sally bake her possum brown.

Asked my mama for fifteen cents
to see the elephant jump the fence.
He jumped so high, he touched the sky
He never got back till the fourth of July.

You see that house upon that hill,
That's where me and my baby live.

Oh the rabbit in the hash come a-stepping in the dash,
With his long-tailed coat and his beaver on.
- Bessie Jones and Bess Lomax Hawes: "Step It Down Games, Plays, Songs And Stories From Afro-American Heritage" (University of Georgia Press ; 1987) . This book includes lyrics and comments about selected African American children's songs from the Georgia Sea Isle.

****
GREEN COLOR UP
(an adaptation of "Green Sally Up" by Azizi Powell, November 1997)

The tune for this song is very much like the Sounds of The South recording of "Green Sally Up". However the tempo is slightly faster.

Performance activities:
A group of people (children, teens, adults) form a circle. A designated caller is chosen.. Follow the instructions as given in brackets with the song lyrics. Note: the song starts with the color "green" unless no one participating is wearing that color. The order in which other colors are called is arbitrary,

After the verse ends for one color, the designated caller immediately choses another color to call. Colors are chosen in a random manner. If the person in the middle is also wearing that particular color shirt or wearing a dress that has that color in it, he or she can remain in the middle. If not, the people in the middle must quickly move back to the circle, and other people wearing that newly called color move to the middle of the circle. Participants follow the movement instructions as given in this song (See the instructions found in brackets].

Designated caller- Green!
All: Green color up
[People wearing green shirts/blouses or wearing the color green in their dresses QUICKLY move to the center of the circle. Everyone else stays in place. Note that it's not mandatory that persons wearing the color that is called out mus move to the center of the circle. Individuals wearing that color may continue standing in their place and perform the instructions for that color there.*

Everyone, including the people in the center of the circle, stands on their toes and stretches their arms up while singing this line]

Green color down [Everyone bends down and triesto touch the ground with their have their fingers OR everyone squats down on the floor]

Green color all around the town. (Clap Clap) [Everyone turns around in place. Optional-Everyone claps their hands two times.

If you have on green just raise your hands. [Everyone wearing green in their shirt/,blouse or dress, regardless of where they are standing raises their hands.]

If you do not, just fold your arms. [Everyone NOT wearing green folds their arms , chest level. Participants often strike a dramatic, deviant, grittin' pose while they fold their arms.]

Designated caller: Yellow! [The caller RANDOMLY calls another out the name of another color. If the people in the center are wearing a shirt, blouse, or dress that contains that color, they can remain in the middle of the circle. Otherwise they must QUICKLY move out of the center of the circle. At the same time, people who are wearing the color that was called out QUICKLY move to the center of the circle.

Follow the instructions as given for the "green color". This continues until all the colors present have been called. There are no winners or losers.

*The purpose is to reinforce color recognition, build team spirit and self confidence, and have fun. Given the purpose of reinforcing self-esteem, the rule that people wearing a certain color don't have to move to the center of the circle was put in place because some children were shy and were therefore reluctant to go into the center.

These instructions may read as though the game is difficult to play. It isn't. Children (preferably along with adults and teens) have fun playing it. I'd count it as a compliment if this game was played by other groups.

I've crossposted this song to Cocojams's text analysis page about "Green Sally Up" and the Jambalayah.com page for "Green Sally Up". Both of those links are given above.

****
GYPSY IN THE MOONLIGHT
Sung by children at the San Juan Girls' Government School, San Juan Trinidad

In ring play formation, "Gypsy" dances outside the circle in verse one, inside during verse two, chooses a partner in verse three, and they dance together through the "tra la la" verse, when the first "Gypsy" leaves, and the new one takes over.

Group: Gypsy in the moonlight,
Gypsy in the dew.
Gypsy never come back,
Until the clock strike two.

Walk in, gypsy, walk in,
Walk right in, I say.
Walk into my parlor
To hear the banjo play.

Gypsy: I don't love nobody,
And nobody loves me.
All I want is Sarah [Harold; Marva etc]
To come dance with me.

Group: Tra la la la la la. (Etc)
-Alan Lomax, J.D. Elder; Bess Lomax Hawes: Brown Girl In The Ring,Caribbean Voyage (New York, Pantheon Press, 1997)

Editor:
The second verse (the Gypsy verse given above reminds me of two very similar verses from the jump rope (skipping) rhyme which is now mostly a hand clap rhyme (in the USA) is "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" (also given as "I Love Coffee I Love Tea").

I like coffee I like tea
I love [boy's name]
And he likes me

and

I like coffee I like tea
I want [child's name]
to come jump with me.

-snip-
I wouldn't be surprised if both "Gypsy In The Moonlight" and "I Like Coffee I Like Tea" has the same source song. And that source song might be much earlier than 19th century or earlier Britain.

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for more information and examples of "I Like Coffee I Like Tea".

Also, click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdy8Qs6JLiU for a video of "Gypsy In The Moonlight" as sung by British? school boys*. That tune sounds the same as the tune as "I Like Coffee I Like Tea".

* The boys sing "I want [student's name] to come sing with me."

For the lyrics to a very similar Trinidadian song collected in 1958 called "Dulcie In The Moonlight" click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=138233&messages=1 Ducie

****
HEADS AND SHOULDERS BABY
Heads and shoulders baby 1, 2, 3
Heads and shoulders baby 1, 2, 3
Heads and shoulders
Heads and shoulders
Heads and shoulders baby 1, 2, 3

Hips and thighs baby 1, 2, 3
Hips and thighs baby 1, 2, 3
Hips and thighs
Hips and thighs
Hips and thighs baby 1, 2, 3

Knees and ankles baby 1, 2, 3
Knees and ankles baby 1, 2, 3
Knees and ankles
Knees and ankles
Knees and ankles baby 1, 2, 3

That's all baby 1, 2, 3
That's all baby 1, 2, 3
That's all
That's all
That's all baby 1, 2, 3
- as sung on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n5KXk0LkaEo&feature=related

Here's that video:

Head and Shoulders Baby

S Joffe, Uploaded on Feb 23, 2008

Susannah's 2nd Grade performance

Editor:
"Head and Shoulders Baby" is an African American version of the children's song
Head and shoulders knees & toes
Knees and toes
Head and shoulders knes & toes
Eyes and ears and mouth and nose
Head and shoulders knees & toes.

-snip-

I can remember singing Head and Shoulder Baby (and the other Head and Shoulders song) as a child in Southern New Jersey in th 1950s, but I only remember the ist and third verses that are given above.

****
HERE COMES SALLY
Here comes Sally, Sally, Sally
Here comes Sally all night long.
So step back Sally, Sally, Sally,
Step back Sally all night long
Struttin down the alley, alley, alley ...
All night long.
-Azizi P, memory of my childhood in the 1950s, Atlantic City, New Jersey

Editor:
See "Here We Go Zudio" and "This-a-way, Valerie" below for closely related rhymes and their performance activities.

****
HERE STANDS A BLUE BIRD (Example #1)
Here stands a blue bird,
Tra la la la.
Here's stands a blue bird,
Tra la la la.
Here's stands a blue bird
Tra la la la.
Oh, she* likes sugar & tea.

Let me see your motion,
Tra la la la.
Let me see your motion,
Tra la la la.
Let me see your motion,
Tra la la la.
Oh, she* likes sugar & tea.

Oh, we can do your motion,
Tra la la la.
We can do your motion,
Tra la la la.
We can do your motion,
Tra la la la.
Oh, she* likes sugar & tea.

Who do you choose?
Tra la la la.
Who do you choose?
Tra la la la.
Who do you choose?
Tra la la la.
Oh, she* likes sugar & tea.

(begin song again with new person in the middle; change color mentioned based on the color shirt or the color of the pants that the person is wearing).

*change gender pronoun to "he" for boys who are selected as the "blue bird"
-various sources, including Azizi P's memories of childhood (Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s); see explanation for the other asterisks in my editor comments

Editor:
"Here Stands A Blue Bird" is a circle game with one person in the middle. I have clear memories of singing this song and playing this game when I was growing up in Atlantic City, New Jersey in the 1950s. It surprised me to learn that, with the exception of my daughter who learned this song from me as a child, "Here Stands A Blue Bird" was also unfamiliar to the children and adult staff & volunteers who participated in Alafia Children's Ensemble's game song groups that I conducted in several Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania communities (1997-2007).

As was customary with those groups, after I taught the group this song, both the children & the adults joined together to perform it (hence the reference to "person" instead of "child" in the performance instructions). Read more information about Alafia Children's Ensemble in Cocojams' About Us page.

Performance Instructions:
The group forms a wide circle around a person who is selected as the first middle person. The middle person doesn't sing. Each person in the group holds the hand of the person to either side of her or him. The group begins singing the song, and walking counter-clockwise around the middle person. During the first verse, the middle person stands and flaps her {or his} arms, pretending to be a bird. The middle person can move around the inside of the circle if she chooses to do so. On the words "oh, she likes sugar & tea", the group stops moving and stops holding hands. Each person in the group, including the middle person, pretends to put a cube of sugar in a cup and then holds the cup close to her or his mouth and drink it.**

The group then continues singing the song, and resumes holding hands and walking counter-clockwise around the circle to the beat of the song. In the second verse, the group drops hands, stands in place, and does a hand clapping foot stomping or hopping to the beat motion while singing the song.**

In response to the command "let me see your motion", the middle person remains in the center of the circle while she performs some movement (such as jumping, hopping, skipping, dancing). In the third verse, the middle person continues to do the same movement that she selected, and the rest of the group tries to exactly imitate that movement. In the fourth verse, the group continues singing, and resumes holding hands, and moving counter-clockwise around the circle.

The middle person closes her eyes and puts her right hand over both of her eyes. While she remains standing in the center of the circle, the middle person extends her left arm, and points her hand out group members while she turns around.*** The person who the middle person is pointing to when the song ends, becomes the new middle person. The former middle person quickly rejoins the circle, and the new middle person quickly takes her place. The game is supposed to immediately begin again.

** These are innovations that my daughter, TMP, added to the performance of this game. I don't recall doing these movements when I was a child.

*** One woman I met who was raised in Georgia in the 1980s, told me that when she and her friends played circle games with one person in the middle, they didn't close their eyes & turn around in order to pick a person "by accident". Instead, the middle person purposely selects the next middle person by walking, strutting or dancing up to that person.

The first line for the tune that was used for this song is very similar to the first line found in the sound file given as Example #2 below. However, the rest of the tune used for Example #2 is different from the way I learned that song.

****
THERE STANDS A BLUEBIRD (Example #2)

Zora Neale Hurston - There Stands a Bluebird

.

WallakAt•, Published on Oct 11, 2012
Recorded. 12-1936

There stands a bluebird, tra la la la
There stands a bluebird, tra la la la
Gimme sugar, coffee and tea.

Now trip around the ocean, tra la la la
Now trip around the ocean, tra la la la
Now trip around the ocean, tra la la la
Gimme sugar, coffee and tea.

Now show me a motion, tra la la la
Now show me a motion, tra la la la
Now show me a motion, tra la la la
Gimme sugar, coffee and tea.

Now choose your partner, tra la la la
Choose your partner, tra la la la
Choose your partner, tra la la la
Gimme sugar, coffee and tea.
-snip-
[The tempo used for verses 2 & 3 is slightly faster than the tempo used for verses 1 & 2,

****
HERE COMES A BLUEBIRD (Example #3)

Trena Anderson• Published on Jan 15, 2013

MMP LH 1st grade class playing "Here comes a bluebird"

-anip-
Here are the lyrics for this song:

Here comes a bluebird in through my window
Hey diddle-um-a day day day.
Pick a little partner, hop in the garden
Hey diddle-um-a day day day.

****
HERE WE GO RIDIN' THAT PONY (Version #1)
....I was a counselor at a camp about three years ago, and the campers (good-natured high school students) played a surprising amount of games during break time. Not surprisingly, they weren't all innocent little rhymes. For example...[a] favorite circle game:[was]

"Here we go, ridin' that pony,
riding around on that big fat pony.
Here we go, ridin' that pony,
this is how we do it:
Front to front to front, oh, baby
Back to back to back, oh, baby
Side to side to side, oh, baby
This is how we do it"
-LNL; "Children's Street Songs", http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300; 3/1/2004

Editor:
"Here We Go Ride That Pony" (also known as "Ride That Pony", and "Ride Ride That Pony" etc) is one of several children's singing games that some teens & young adults enthusiastically play. See "Little Sally Walker Walkin Down The Street" on this page for another example of a children's game that's not only played by children but also played by teens, and young adults.

Editor:
The words, structure, and accompanying movements of "Ride The Pony" are very much in the tradition of African American songs & rhymes. I'd love to "hear" from anyone who remembers this game prior to the 2000s. Please contact me via cocojams17@yahoo.com.

****
HERE WE GO RIDE THAT PONY (Version #2)
In 2006 before volleyball games: - This is really similar to little sally walker

-Person in middle walks around the inside of circle formed by the rest of the team.

"Here we go ride that pony.
Ride around that big fat pony.
Here we go ride that pony.
This is how we do it."

Person chooses someone to dance with.

"front to front to front my baby" (dance front to front)
"back to back to back my baby" (turn around and dance back to back)
"side to side to side my baby" (dance side to side)
"this is how we do it..." (the people switch and now the person who was on the outside dances around the inside of the circle as the rhyme repeats...)
-Katie S., (White female, 17 years old), Dallas Texas; 10/6/2009

Editor: As a reminder, for the sake of folkloric documentation & research, individuals submitting an example for possible publication on Cocojams are asked to include the race/s, gender/s, and age/s of the people who perform (or who they remember performing) that example. However, examples can be sent to cocojams17@yahoo.com without that information.

****
RIDE THAT PONY (Version #3)
Here we go! (Ride that pony)
Ride around! (It's a big fat pony!)
Here we go! (Ride that pony)
This is how we do it:
Front to front to front, my baby!
Back to back to back, my baby!
Side to side to side, my baby!
THIS IS HOW WE DO IT!!!!

((Repeat until your hands fall off))
-AttheCircus (Webster Groves High School, Colorado Springsl Colorado); http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHiRMQ5hgPI&feature=related ; April 18, 2008

Here's that video:

AttheCircus | April 20, 2008
The Webster Groves High School choir students play a long game of Ride that Pony in the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs on April 18, 2008.

****
THIS IS THE WAY WE RIDE THAT PONY (Version #4)
This is the way we ride that pony
This is the way we ride that pony
This is the way we ride that pony
And this is how we do it
Front, front, front my baby
Back back back my baby
Side side side my baby
And this is how we do it
-vballprincess (Reno, Nevada); May 4, 2006

Here's that video:

vballprincess | May 04, 2006
Me and team before volleyball game in reno having some fun.

Editor: Slightly different examples of this game song are found in the viewer comments to this video. For instance, one example starts with the words "Ride ride ride that pony" and another one starts with the words "Come on baby, ride my pony".

****
HERE WE GO ZUDIO
Examples are placed below under "Z"

****
HEY ALAFIA * (change name to your group's name or your city's name)
Hey Alafia,
(reply: Hey Alafia
Let's sing Alafia,
(reply: Let's sing Alafia
Marching down the avenue
(reply: Marching down the avenue)
Five *more miles and we'll be through
(reply-Five more miles and we'll be through)
Go left, go le-ft
(Go left, go-le-eft)
Go left, right, le-eft
(Go left, right, le-eft)
Go left, go right go pick up sticks. Go left go right go left.
(Go left, go right go pick up sticks. Go left go right go left)
Hey Alafia [tc with the next number until you get to]
Hey Alafia,
(reply: Hey Alafia
Let's sing Alafia,
(reply: Let's sing Alafia
Marching down the avenue
(reply: Marching down the avenue)
No more miles so we are through
(reply- No more miles so we are through)
Go left, go le-ft
(Go left, go-le-eft)
Go left, right, le-eft
(Go left, right, le-eft)
Go left, go right go pick up sticks. Go left go right go left.
(Go left, go right go pick up sticks. Go left go right go left)
-adapted by Azizi Powell, 1999 (from the camp song "All you Knuckleheads")

* "Five" is an abitrary number. However, I found that this number works well, and that starting with ten makes the song tooo long.

Editor: This is a song that I adapted in 1999 for the children's game song group that I conceptualized & facilitated named Alafia (ah-LAH-fee-ah) Children's Ensemble. The song is an adaptation of a camp song "All You Knuckleheads" that my children learned from Lillian Taylor Camp, (a camp run by The Kingsley Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). The song "All You Knuckleheads" is probably itself an adaptation of the military cadence "Hey You Knuckleheads". Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/military-cadences-other-cadences to read that cadence.

The words "let's sing Alafia" fit our purpose of our group because it was a game song group. If you use this song for your group, the word "sing" could be changed to another action word such as "play" or "cheer" or "dance". This song was great for developing and reinforcing a strong, positive sense of group identity.

Performance Directions:
This song uses a call/response pattern throughout. The way that I taught it to the girls & boys (ages 5-12 years) was that the caller (leader) stands at the front of a vertical line, and moves in using a foot stomping. congo-like fashion throughout the room or area. The rest of the group line up behind the leader and follows her or his movements.

On the line "Let's sing Alaifa" the leader uses the American Sign Language motions for sing (your left arm is outstretched with your palm face up, and your right arm makes a back & forth waving motion a little bit over your left arm). On the line "marching down the avenue", the leader makes an exaggerated marching movement.

The leader' s arms and the rest of the groups' arms follow the direction of the movements (that is, if the leader moves to the left, her body turns slightly and her arms move together the left . If she moves to the right, her body turns slightly to the right, and her arms also move together to the right. The lines "Go left go right go pick up sticks. Go left go right go left" are tricky and therefore add to the challenge & the fun of learning the chant. On the words "pick up sticks", the leader bends her knees down and acts out the motion of picking up sticks. The group is supposed to do the same motions AFTER the leader finishes singing those entire two lines. The song then starts immediiately again with the next number until the end of the song "no more miles so we are through" . Enjoy! :.

****
HI HO CAPTAIN JACK
Hi Ho Captain Jack
Meet me down by the railroad tracks
With your hiking boots in your hands
I'm gonna be your hikin' man

Chorus:
Go Left, go right
Go left, right, left
Go-o left, go right, go swing around steps, go left, go right, go left

Hi Ho Captain Jack
Meet me down by the railroad tracks
With your swimming suit in your hands
I'm gonna be your swimmin' man
(CHORUS)

Hi Ho Captain Jack
Meet me down by the railroad tracks
With your basketball in your hands
Im gonna be your slam-dunkin' man
(CHORUS)

Hi Ho Captain Jack
Meet me down by the railroad tracks
With your fishing pole in your hands
I'm gonna be your fishin'man
(CHORUS)

Hi Ho Captain Jack
Meet me down by the railroad tracks
With your pizza in your hands
I'm gonna be your delivery man

Action
You act out whatever you're doing at the time. When the leader says "Hi ho Captain Jack" you salute the person. Its a little different on the versus however. For example, if it says "with your basketball in your hand," you might be dribbling a basketball, and when it says, "I'm gonna be your slam-dunking man," you can be pretending to shoot a basket

Comment: You start out by saying "This is a repeat after me song"
-http://www.scoutorama.com/song/song_display.cfm?song_id=847 ; retrieved September 3, 2010

Editor:
Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/military-cadences-other-cadences to find examples of "Hey Ho Captain Jack" (also known as "Hey Hey Captain Jack". A similar mulitary cadence "Hey You Knuckleheads" and comments about its adaptation for children's groups arealso found on that page.

****
HOLD UP THE GATEPOSTS
I remember a game called" Hold Up The Gateposts". Two people would make a bridge with their hands clasped to each other and held up high over their heads. Other children would then march around and under their arms. The song went: Hold up the gate post High as the sky; Let King George and his horses pass by. Here's the hatchett, Laying on the bed Next one come We're gonna chop off his head. And with that , the arms would come down and capture the person who was under the "bridge"
-Judy G.; 12/10/2007

Editor:
The "hatchet gonna chop off his head" and this game's play instructions reminds me of the "London Bridge is Falling Down" game that I played when I was a child in Atlantic City New Jersey (1950s). See that example below.

****
HOOKA TOOKA MY SODA CRACKER
[Editor: This is a repost of a comment from a guest on a Mudcat Discussion Forum thread]

I see that it's been several years since this thread has been posted on, but I'll toss in my two cents anyways. Came looking for lyrics when this tune popped into my mind and I was trying to teach it to my kids but couldn't remember very many words. I learned it at a (very white) Girl Scout camp somewhere in the Northeast sometime in the early 1980's. My recollection says the song went something like:

Hooka tooka my soda cracker?
Does your Mama Chaw tobacca? (Yes she does)
If your mama chaws tobacca,
Then it's hooka tooka my soda cracker

Red and Green oh Rocky Road
I said
Red and Green oh Rocky Road
I said
Red and Green oh Rocky Road
I said
Promenading Green

Now, granted, the song never made any sense to me so I am probably not likely to have remembered it accurately and I make no promises that my recollection of how the song goes is anything like how they sung it at camp. But, interestingly, my mother was a big fan of PP&M and when I came home singing the song it was completely unfamiliar to her or any one else in my suburban neighborhood...
-Guest; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=27047 Green, Green Rocky Road; November 1, 2001

Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1lZ4uaprh4&feature=related for a sound file of Chubby Checker's version of the related song "Hooka Tooka"

I,J
I'M A NUT
This was a fun rhyme we used to sing in Elementary School:

I'm a nut (click tongue twice and knock head) in a rut (click tongue twice and knock head) I'm craaazy (crazy motion around ear)
Coca cola went to town
Diet pepsi knocked him down
Dr. pepper fixed him up
Now we all drink 7-Up.
I'm a nut (click tongue twice and knock head) in a rut (click tongue twice and knock head) I’m craaazy (crazy motion around ear)
7-up got the flu
Now we all drink mountain dew
Mountain dew fell off the mountain
Now we all drink from the fountain
I'm a nut (click tongue twice and knock head) in a rut (click tongue twice and knock head) I'm craaazy (crazy motion around ear)
Fountain broke, people choke
Now we all drink cherry coke
Cherry coke lost it’s cherry
Now we all drink loganberry (I still have no idea what that is)

I'm a nut (click tongue twice and knock head) in a rut (click tongue twice and knock head) I'm craaazy (crazy motion around ear)
Loganberry was a joke
Now we're back to drinking coke.
-Katie S., (White female, 17 years old), Dallas Texas; 10/6/2009

Editor:
"Loganberry" is a brand name for soda (pop) and is also a type of wine.

****
I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE
"I'm going' down town to smoke my pipe" is a family of games which are also known as "Witch In The Well", "What Time Is It. Mrs Witch", "Black Spider" . "Old Blue Witch" and other names. Regardless of the title used or the first line, (what I consider to be) examples of this game are posted in this section. Hopefully, this posting will elicit more information & examples of this game & other children's games.

I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE (Example #1)
I'm going' down town to smoke my pipe. I won't be back till broad daylight. If you let one of my children go, I'll spank you with my rubber shoe".
-dulcimer42; 'I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe" ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753 ; 4/26/2008

Editor:
This is a fragment of a game that dulcimer42 posted on that Mudcat Discussion Forum thread. dulcimer42 indicated that kids chanted that rhyme at the beginning of an outdoor game that he {or she} recalled playing in Michigan around 1950. In that discussion thread I suggested that this game might be similar to "Chickama Chickama Craney Crow". See information about that game on this page. Also see other examples of "I'm Going Downtown To Smoke My Pipe" on this page.

For what it's worth, a number of posters to that Mudcat thread are (or were) from Michigan. From those posters it appears that that game was commonly played in that state.

Do you know this game? If so, please share your version of this game with other Cocojams readers by sending your example to cocojams17@yahoo.com.

****
I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE (Example #2)
Editor: Visit http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=287186 for a discussion about this game. This brief discussion dating from 12/14/2003 to 4/23/2004 contains two examples of the use of this chant as part of a "hide & seek" type game. T

hese versions are similar to the "Chicama Chicama Craney Crow" game. The 1922 version of that game that I posted on this page probably came from a much older game. As a matter of fact, In that google answer thread, workplace-ga writes 23 Apr 2004 ".Wow this is interesting! I used to play this game as a child too up in Canada! Check out the children's story written by Audrey Wood entitled, "Heckedy Peg". Her story is very similar to our game. She credits this story going back to a 16th century game."

Here are all of the versions of that verse that are found on the google.com/answers page whose link is provided. The information about where the game was played is provided in italics. Click on the link for more information about how these game were played.

Played at a country school in Michigan in the '30s:
"I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe and I
won't be back till broad daylight and if you let my muffins burn I'll
spank you blue (various colors)
-cv5830-ga

**
I remember this game from my childhood in the quiet rural neighborhoods of New York:
"I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe and I won't be back until
Saturday night, I hope that old witch doesn't kidnap my kids tonight."
-NYmother911-ga

**
NYMother911-ga also found this version on a Google cache of Mycampinfo.com
www.mycampinfo.com/games/game.asp?lngGameID=1018
The mother says to the babysitter: "I'm going downtown to
smoke my pipe, and I won't be back until Saturday night. And don't let
that witch take any of my children!"

Note: These examples are posted on Cocojams with my thanks and with the express purpose of helping to preserve information about children's games. Hopefully, this posting will elicit more information & examples of this game & other children's games.

****
I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE (Example #3)
Editor: Thom Holbrook gives a detailed description of this game on this webpage: http://www.poobala.com/yardgames/witchinthewell.html Holbrook describes this children's outdoor chasing game as a "play" that is a "variation of the game of tag but includes acting". The characters in the play are the parent (either father or mother or both), two or more children, and one "witch". The version of the rhyme that Holbrook remembers is:

"I’m going downtown to smoke my pipe and I won’t be back till Saturday night. And don’t get into the brown sugar and butter".

-snip-

Holbrook also remembers this exchange between the father and the witch:
Dad: What are you doing in my well?
Witch: Smoking my pipe.
Dad: Why are you smoking your pipe?
Witch: To make ashes?
Dad: Why are you making ashes?
Witch: To sharpen my knife.
Dad: Why are you sharpening your knife?
Witch: TO CUT OFF YOUR HEADS!!!

At that point the witch rushes at everyone and the game becomes a quick game of tag.
-Thom Holbrook, "Witch In The Well"; http://poobala.com/yardgames/witchinthewell.html; assessed 10/21/2008

Editor:
I have attempted to email Thom Holbrook to request permission to repost this example, but the email address was no longer active. If someone knows a contact address, please send it in to Cocojams.

****
I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE (Example #4)

Editor: Note that the play activity is described as being Jump Rope and not a singing game.

I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe,
I won't be back til broad daylight,
if you let the witch get little sister Sue,
I'll spank you black, I'll spank you blue,
I'll spank you with the heel of my old rubber shoe

This is the version we used to jump rope to. Back in the 50's, Saginaw, MI
-Guest, blaine; 'I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe" ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753 ; 2/27/2009

****
I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO SMOKE MY PIPE (Example #5)
I remember playing this game in the 50s as a kid. It started out "I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe and I won't be back till broad day light - and I'll whip you black and I'll whip you blue especially you my daughter Sue." One of the kids had to be Sue who hid in a pretend upstairs. Then the witch came and the kids pretended to be a piano and held out their hands and said something like "good daddy" another "bad daddy" etc. at some point they were asked "Where's Sue?" They would all say "upstairs" The witch would ask how did she get there and some of the would say "by tables and chairs." They had been pretending to be table and chairs. I can't remember much more - Sue, I think had to run at this point.
-Guest, Nancy; 'I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe" ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753; 9/13/2009

****
OLD BLUE WITCH (Example #6 of "I'm Going Dowtown To Smoke My Pipe)
In Tennessee its called Old Blue Witch
I'm going to town to smoke my pipe I won't be back til Saturday Night, and if I find out that old blue witch has been here, I'll beat you black and blue with my old shoe

This was said to the "oldest child who was in charge of the other children. The witch would come steal each child til there were non left, and assign each child a color. When the parent went to the witch's house to retrieve her kids. The witch would send him on a goose chase down 3 roads, then allow her to guess the color of some children she had. If the parent guessed the color, the kid was released and the parent got to chase the kid back home.
-Guest, 'I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe" ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753; 5/10/2010

****
I'M GOING DOWNTOWN TO WATCH A FIGHT (Example #7 of I'm Going Downtown To Smoke My Pipe)
Did anybody else go "downtown to watch the fight" instead of to "smoke a pipe"?

"I'm goin' downtown to watch the fight
I won't be back 'til Saturday night.
If you let that old witch in the house,
I'll beat you black and blue
With my old rubber shoe."

I grew up in central Indiana and played this game in the 50's. Going to the fight made sense to me, because our farmer grandpa was a huge fan of early televised wrestling, and nobody we knew smoked pipes!
- Guest, Guest. http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753&messages=50 kid's' game: I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe ; September 2, 2010

Editor: Visit that discussion forum for more examples of this game. I'm curious if the "I'm Going Downtown To Smoke My Pipe" game or games like it are known outside of the USA. Please send examples to cocojams17@yahoo.com . Thanks!

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IN A FINE CASTLE
...And there's a Caribbean nursery rhyme that's haunted me for years, but I haven't yet figured out the story I want to write around it yet:

In a fine castle,
Do you hear, my sissie-o?

Ours is the prettiest,
Do you hear, my sissie-o?

We want one of them,
Do you hear, my sissie-o?

Which one do you want?
Do you hear, my sissie-o?

The rhyme is sung by two groups of children holding hands in two rings, with each group alternating verses. They get into haggling, all in rhyme, over which person they want from the other group, and what gift they will give her if s/he comes. That's where the children get to invent. There's much giggling over disgusting gifts that the group comes up with, with the other group responding in song, "That don't suit her, do you hear, my sissie-o?". When the supplicant group tires of it, they start offering appealing gifts until the other group agrees to send one of their number over, sings him or her a farewell, and the song starts again.
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/boardarchives/2003/mar2003/childrenga... posted by Nalo 3/7/03

-snip-
Click these links for two post that I wrote on "In A Fine Castle":

http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/two-examples-of-caribbean-game-s...

and

http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/example-of-in-fine-castle-brown-...

****
IN THE RIVER ON THE BANK
This elimination game is similar to "Simon Says" in that players standing in a horizontal line facing a designated leader are supposed to correctly respond to that leader's quickly given commands.

Click http://cocojams.com/content/river-bank-game for a video of this game, and comments, and performance instructions about this game. and com

****
I WENT UP THE ROAD
My mother told me she heard black children in SW Georgia using this one when they were "It" in Hide and Seek. [My mother was born in 1921, so I assume she heard the rhyme in the late '20s or early '30s.]

"I went up the road, the road were muddy,

'Tomped my toe and made it bloody.

(Ain't gonna count but one more time. . .)

How many times the rhyme was said was indeterminate, so you never knew when It was about to start looking."
-Tom Byrd, (Gibsonville, NC), August 17, 2013

****
JOHNNY CUCKOO
[Players stand in a horizontal line with one player "Johnny Cuckoo" standing apart from the line. Single player approaches line and dances to the rhythm. Everyone sings except Johnny Cuckoo/s]

1st verse:
Here comes one Johnny Cuckoo
Cuckoo; Cuckoo
Here comes one Johnny Cuckoo
On a cold and stormy night

2nd verse:
What did you come for
Come for
Come (here) for
What did you come for
On a cold and stormy night

3rd verse:
I come for me (We come for us)
A soldier, soldier,
I come for me (We come for us)
A soldier
On a cold and stormy night

[There is a significant increase in the speed of the singing and players begin a double offbeat clap; All of the players in the line turn their backs on the "Johnny Cuckoo/s and switch their hips to the rhythm]

4th verse
You look too black and dirty
Dirty dirty
You look too black and dirty
On a cold and stormy night

5th verse sung by Johnny Cuckoo/s
I'm (We're) just as good* as you are
You are. You are.
I'm (We're) just as good as you are
On a cold and stormy night

* sometimes given as "just as clean as you are"

-snip-

The song immediately repeats from the beginning with the first Johnny Cuckoo picking another player to act the role of the second Johnny Cuckoo along with her. The group sings "Here comes two Johnny Cuckoos etc

This continues with multiple Johnny Cuckoos until the game ends. .
Source: Bessie Jones, Bess Hawes Lomax: Step It Down: Games, Plays, Songs & Stories from the Afro-American Heritage. "Johnny Cuckoo" is also included as as #10 on the 3rd CD of "A Musical Journey From The Georgia Sea Islands To The Mississippi Delta", Alan Lomax; 1993 Atlantic Recording

Editor:
In my opinion, the African American children's game "Johnny Cuckoo" is a variant form of the much older British children's game "Dukes A' Riding" ("Three Dukes") Visit http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=34425 "Help: johnny cockaroo" to read my comments on that subject. Also see "We're Riding Here To Get Married" in this collection for the words to another African American game song that I believe is also related to "Dukes A Riding" (and therefore also is related to "Johnny Cuckoo"). One version of "Dukes A Riding" is found at http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiTHREDUK1.html

"Johnny Cuckoo" probably dates from the Civil War era. I believe that this African American game song "Johnny Cuckoo" used dramatic play to teach & reinforce self-esteem and self-confidence. Hopefully, the children internalized the affirmation that "I'm just a good as you are" for the times when they would experience put downs as children, teens, and adults.

I'm not certain if "Johnny Cuckoo" is still sung in Georgia or elsewhere. I have no knowledge of it from my childhood in New Jersey, and haven't come across anyone who knows it in my adopted city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

An example of "Johnny Cuckoo"'s performance is found beginning at 3:26 of this video:

ichagall | April 20, 2010
Little Sally Walker Bessie Jones

****
JUMP SHAMADOR (Example #1)
Good morning to you, Joseph.
Good morning to you, too
What is your intention?
I want to be a doctor.
You can't be a doctor.
I WILL be a doctor.
Well, jump shamador my, darling
Jump shamador, my dear
-West Indies ring (circle) game; Cheryl Warren Mattox:Shake It To The One The You Love The Best; Play Songs And Lullabies From Black Musical Traditions (El Sobrante, California, Warren-Maddox Productions; 1986) p. 10

Editor: The game continues with the next player whose name is called. That player chooses a profession. Here's a description from that book:
"This song has an important message-if you believe in yourself, you can be whatever you want to be. Each player chooses a profession. When your name is called, go to the middle of the ring. Respond to the question -"What is your intention?"- by naming your choice of a profession. Show how determined you are by being forceful when you sing the line, "I WILL be a ____!".

Note that the phrase "jump shamador" is presented as the second verse to a version of "Brown Girl In The Ring" entitled "Black Boy In The Ring". That song is included in Walter Jekyll, 1904, Jamaican Song and Story. It was posted on http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40845&messages=15 Lyr Req: jamaican folk music by Q on June 9, 2011.

Wheel an' take you pardner, jump shamador!
(3x)
For he like sugar and I like plum.

-snip-

This comment was included with that post :
"The boy inside the ring chooses his partner, whom he leaves there after the dance. She obtains release by choosing another partner, whom she leaves behind. So there is alternately a boy and a girl in the ring.
"Shamador" is possibly a corruption of "camerado." "

-snip-
"Camerado" probably means "comrade" (friend). If the above comment is accurate, then "jump shamador" means "jump, friend".

****
JUMP SHAMADOR (Example #2)
Good morning to you daughter
Good morning to you, mother.
What is your intention?
I want to be a teacher (farmer, dancer, doctor)
You can not be a teacher (farmer, dancer, doctor)
I will be a teacher (farmer, dancer, doctor)
So jump shamador my darling.
Jump shamador my dear
-Jamaican game song; "The British Empire: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:T6S3PfYxpHUJ:www.ktts.earlysta...

K,L
KING WILLIAM WAS KING JAMES' SON
[Editor: I'm reposting this long quote from http://www.kshs.org/p/kansas-historical-quarterly-kansas-play-party-song... *as a means of increasing awareness of this game song.]

*Kansas Historical Quarterly - Kansas Play-Party Songs
by Myra E. Hull
November 1938 (Vol. 7, No. 4), pages 258 to 286

"Another English game similarly played is "King William Was King James's Son." Version "A" here recorded was sung by Hannah Oliver, who brought it from England to Lawrence more than eighty years ago. The game is an old favorite throughout the United States, many versions having been submitted to The Journal of American Folk-Lore.

The song is sung under various names. In W. W. Newell's versions it appears as "King Arthur Was King William's Son" and "King William Was King George's Son." Mr. Newell gives minute instructions showing how the game was played with hats in England and with a shawl in Ireland. In Kansas and other states in the Middle West, however, the game was a partner-choosing, kissing game. The song furnishes interesting examples of folk etymology. In Kansas, for "royal race" we sang "lawyer race." In Idaho, they sing-

Around the river race he run;
Upon his breast he wore a star,
Pointing to the ocean far.

In the Kansas version "B" the singer, Joyce Harvey, a colored girl of a Lawrence pioneer family in which the song is traditional, seemed somewhat doubtful about "To point the way to Corkery," but certain about "Riley, Riley, race he run." In such a manner, lines of folk songs often become meaningless, through oral trans- mission.

HULL: KANSAS PLAY-PARTY SONGS 267
KING WILLIAM WAS KING JAMES'S SON

"A"
1. King William was King James's son;
Upon the royal race he run.
Upon his breast he wore a star,
To point the way to the contest far.
2. Go choose you east, go choose you west;
Go choose the one that you love best.
If she's not here to take her part,
Go choose another with all your heart.
3. Down on this carpet you must kneel
As sure as the grass grows in the field.
Salute your bride and kiss her sweet,
And now you rise upon your feet.

"B"
King William was King James's son;
Riley, Riley race he run.
Upon his breast he wore a star,
To point the way to Corkery"

****
KNOCK KNOCK
Versions of "Knock Knock" and related chants are posted in this section without regard to their title.

KNOCK KNOCK (Version #1)
Knock Knock
Who's there?
Grandpa
What do you want?
A glass of beer.
Where's your money?
In my pants.
Where's your pants?
At Home.
Get out of here, you dirty bum.
-various posters; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82053&messages=25
Folklore: Where's your money? In my pocket ; reposted on 7/30/2011 from various examples on that thread

Also, click http://www.ahajokes.com/kkn001.html for examples of clean knock knock jokes.

****
RAT A TAT TAT (Version #2 of Knock Knock)
Rat-a-tat-tat (door knocking gesture)
Who is that?
On-ly Grandma's pu-ssy-cat.
What d'you want?
A pint of milk.
Where's your money?
In my pocket.
Where's your pocket?
I for-got it.
Oh you si-lly pu-ssy-cat!

Kids set of call and answer "game" from my childhood (UK, northern). Hard to reproduce the rhythm on the page, quite stacatto (sp?) though.
-gnomad ; June 16, 2005

Note: Another commenter on that thread, Mo the Caller, indicated that that same chant "was around in London too in the late [19]40s".

****
FA (WHERE) ARE YOU GOING (Version #3 of Knock Knock)
Far are ye gaein'? Across the gutter.
Fat for? A pund o' butter.
Far's yer money? In my pocket.
Far's yer pocket? Clean forgot it!
Far are ye gaein'? Across the gutter.
-Guest, Murray from Saltspring, June 17, 2005

[Comments from the poster:
That "Fa" by the way = General Scots "Wha". [Aberdonian dialect]

Source of quote is:
Jean C. Rodger, Lang Strang (1948), 13, from Forfar, c. 1910. Cf. Ritchie Golden City (1965), 48, counting-out from Edinburgh, "Who's there?/ Tiny Tiny Bear", etc. [See Opies Lore and Language of Schoolchildren (1959), 10, a fascinating (and all too rare) series of comparisons covering two and a quarter centuries, the earliest specimen being lines from Henry Carey's satire Namby Pamby, 1726: "Now he acts the Grenadier,/ Calling for a Pot of Beer:/ Where's his Money? He's forgot:/ Get him gone, a Drunken Sot."]

****
KNOCK KNOCK (Version #4)
Knock Knock
Who's there Grandpa
What do you want a glass of beer ...(glass of milk)
Where's your money...
in my pocket
Where's your pocket...
in my pants
Where are your pants ....
I left them home
Where do you live....
across the street
What's your number?...
Cucumber
- Guest, ca; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82053&messages=25Folklore: Where's your money? In my pocket; August 19, 2010

****
KYE KYE KULE (pronounced "Shay Shay Koo lay"; also given as "Che Che Cole" and "Che Che Kulay" and similar spellings)

Editor's Note: "Kye Kye Kule" is a traditional children's game song from Ghana, West Africa. I;ve included this song on this page of English language children's movement songs because it has been included in various American elementary school music text books, and has been featured on some American children's records, usually under the title "Che Cole". I'm personally aware that a game song version of "Che Che Cole" has been introduced to American audiences by African dance groups [of African American, and/or other nationalities]. And I'm personally aware that this song is one of a tiny number of African songs that has been included in American music textbooks used in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (and probably other cities in the USA)..

The following entries include text examples of Akan (Ghanaian) and English language versions of this song. This entry also includes my comments about this song, comments from two Ghanaian visitors to this website, and comments from other visitors to this site. Videos of children moving to this song are also included.

Thanks to all who have sent in examples & comments about this song. Your examples/comments are also welcomed and can be sent to cocojams17@yahoo.com

It should be noted that I wasn't aware that the Ghanaian children's song Kye Kye Kule became a Caribbean dance song until I came across a number of videos of this song on YouTube. In June 2008 I started ta thread (discussion) about "Che Che Cole" on the Mudcat Cafe folk & blues music forum. Click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108069&messages=63 to visit that thread.

**
On February 22, 2006, I received a message from Johann Quarcoo via Cocojam's comment page. I responded to Quarcoo's message and specifically asked him about the children's game song "Kye Kye Kule". See these excerpts of that email:

"Johann Quarcoo, there is a song that is taught to children in some public schools here called 'Che Che Kule'. This is pronounced by us as 'Chay Chay Kulay'. {I'm sure this isn't the right spelling}. Here are the words to that song that a Ghanaian man who I met in Pittsburgh, Pennslyvania in the 1980s shared with me:

Kye kule
Kye kye kule.
Kye kye kofi sa x2
kofi salanga x2
Salatilanga x2
kum ayede , kumayede , kumayede

-snip-
Also, Johann, see this message that I received from a Cocojams' reader in 2005:

"Hello... I did a search on the song che che kule because I had remembered singing this song in music class when I was in the 4th or 5th grade. The search led me to your site.

We sang this song as we touched our heads and then shoulders and so on. It was a song which was in our text book.

I was amazed at how well I remembered the words considering the years that have passed. I don't know why I recalled it but I'm glad I was able to find information about this song. I just thought I would let you know. Thanks, Have a great day."

-snip-

Johann, do you know this song? I'd love to know what the words are in your language what they mean {if anything}. That song mentions the name Kofi and I understand that "Kofi" is a Ghanaian name that means "male born on Friday". Would you please share with me how this song is performed? Thank you.

-snip-

Johann asked me to call him Quarcoo. Here is Quarcoo's response:
"I made some enquiries about this song. It is a Ga game but because of our school system which promotes ethnic fusion it has become a national thing. My dad couldn't really tell me the meaning of the words, but said that the words: "Salanga" is a name used by northerners [members of ethnic groups who live in the Northern part of Ghana] (could be Dagomba, Frafra or Gonja) so Kofi Salanga is a northern boy. And when singing the song, with the pronouncement of every sentence you touch your body in ascending and descending order. When you start "kyekye kule" (you touch your shoulders with both hands and those responding kyekye kule will do likewise, continue to your waist, knees and the toes) and this continues till you reach your toes and then you start all over again.

Kyekye kule on national t.v (called Ghana T.V or GTV) was a children's programme, and it was so popular that I never for once missed an episode. It was hosted by an old teacher. It was filled with several other Ghanaian games...
-Johann Quarcoo, from Ghana, by electronic message to
Azizi Powell, 2/24/2006; posted by Azizi on Cocojams 2/26/06.

Editor:
According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghana, and other online resources, "Northern" is one of 10 regions of modern day Ghana. Also, the Ga are one of the major ethnic groups of Ghana. Also visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akan_name for information on the Ghanaian day name Kofi (meaning "male born on Friday") and other Ghanaian day names.

-snip-

Here is another email about "Kye Kye Kule" that I received on 5/15/2009 from a Ghanaian woman, Abena Gyebi:

"Sorry, cocoyam, You see I have always known the Ghanaian children's song Kye kye kule. The Kum adende or Kum aye dei was always part of it. I do not believe it is a later addition; I mean I'm into my fifties and I've always known it with the Kum. Maybe it's because the people you talked to were male. I guess when we as girls were playing kye kye kule they were busy playing football or so.(Or hunting rats?-:)

'Kum' apart from its Akan meaning - to kill- is also the sound made when something falls heavily on the ground,like a child falling or something dropping.

The other version of the game was instead of running behind the circle and tapping someone on the shoulder, one bent down and dropped a piece of cloth behind one of those sitting in the circle. It was supposed to be done so artfully that the one with the piece of cloth did not notice it.The singing and clapping then got more exciting as the runner got closer and closer to where she had dropped the piece of cloth. If the sitting person still did not notice the cloth, she got a 'boo' or a smack on the shoulder for being inattentive. On the other hand, if she got alerted, she would then run as fast as possible chasing the first runner until the first runner took her place in the circle. Then she would take over the kye kye kule and look for another person behind whom she would drop the piece of cloth. This version of kye kye kule was an adaptation of another children's game we called 'anto akyire'"

-snip-

Abena Gyebi is correct that the only Ghanaians who have given me information about this song are males. I'm very grateful that she has shared information about the meaning of the word "kum" in the Akan language word "Kum".And I am grateful tha Abena Gyebi shared information about how she and other girls played this game.
The performance information that she shared sounds very much like the American children's game "Duck, Duck, Goose", doesn't it?

-snip-
Unfortunately, I have not yet found any videos of Ghanaian children singing or performing "Kye Kye Kule".

Here's a video of the way "Kye Kye Kule" is usually performed by American children:

Che che koolay

Posted by rclcdj
June 04, 2009

"2009 P2 African Feast"

**
Here's a video of Kye Kye Kule performed by South African school children:

Shay Shay Koolay

Posted by ElanaMichele
November 03, 2008

"Thina, Noroza, and Hope lead Shay Shay Koolay in the field behind Sivuyiseni. Check out www.artworkforyouth.com."

**
Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0 to find the foot stomping cheers "Jay Jay Kukalay" and "J J Coolaid" that I believe are based on the Ghanaian children's song "Kye Kye Kule". Also visit http://www.jambalayah.com/node/169 to find a video of "Che Che Kule" as performed by the Puerto Rican artists Hector Levoe and Willie Colen. That video is just one example of the numerous Latin and African musicians/singers who have recoreded dance songs that have as their source this Ghanaian children's game song.

Those people who are interested in reading more about the salsa versions and the children's rhyme versions of this song may visit this discussion thread that I started on Mudcat Cafe http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=108069&messages=63 Kye Kye Kule.

****
LITTLE JOHNNY BROWN (Version #1)
Little Johnny Brown, spread your comfort down (2x),
Fold one corner, Johnny Brown,
Fold another corner, Johnny Brown (3x),
Take it to your lover, Johnny Brown (2x),
Show her your motion, Johnny Brown (2x),
Lope like a buzzard, Johnny Brown (2x),
Give it to your lover, Johnny Brown (2x).
-from Bessie Jones (African American Georgia Sea Isle [Gullah] singer/folklorist)

Although the technical quality of this old video is poor, the content is high quality. Because of its folkloric value, I'm reposting it here.

Little Johnny Brown (float like a buzzard)

Editor:
"Johnny Brown" is a circle game with one person in the center. The words and accompanying movements of this song reveals its origin as a coed "courting" game. In the context of this game song, a "comfort" is a small blanket. The term "comforter" is still used in Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania to refer to a blanket. Giving a folded blanket to a person may have originally been a sign of romantic interest. However, in the context of this game, bending down and folding the blanket and then moving to the person you select is a way of showing off your dancing/movement skills.

As shown in this video, the center person folds the corners of the blanket and then moves in front of a person forming the circle. The center person then does a dance in front of the selected person. That person then does the same dance. The center person then gives the selected person the "comfort" (blanket) and then takes her or his place in the center of the circle. The selected person then becomes the new center person, and the song begins from the beginning. The people forming the circle clap hands and stomp their feet while singing this song. At a specific part of the song, the singing, handclapping, and foot stomping speeds up.

The name "Johnny Brown" appears to be used for a male or a female, though it's possible that the name "Jenny Brown" is used for females. Notice the rhythmical handclapping, foot stomping movements that Bessie Jones and one of the Black girls forming the circle make. Also notice the dance movements, including the "Buzzard Lope", that that same Black girl makes. The "Buzzard Lope" is a very old African American plantation dance which may have originated as a West African religious dance. In my opinion, other African American imitative bird dances such as "The Eagle Rock" and "The Funky Chicken" are modifications & continuations of the Buzzard Lope.

For more information on the Buzzard Lope, visit http://www.streetswing.com/histmain/z3buzzardlope1.htm. According to http://www.junkanoobeat.com/?cmd=view&artid=60 the original Jonkanoo dance movement of one step forward and two steps backwards is said to be based on (a possibly different form of) the Buzzard Lope.

Also visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buzzard_lope for more information on the Buzzard Lope,

In the context of this game song, a "comfort" is a small blanket. The term "comforter" is still used in Pittsburgh,Pennsylvania to refer to a blanket or quilt. It's possible that giving a folded blanket to a person of another gender was an indication of your romantic interest in a person. However, in the context of this game, bending down and folding the blanket and then moving to the person you select is a way of showing of your dancing/movement skills.

****
LITTLE JOHNNY BROWN (Version #2)
Little Johnny Brown, lay your blanket down (2x),
Fold one corner, Johnny Brown,
(Now) fold another corner, Johnny Brown
Fold another corner, Johnny Brown (2x),
Show me your motion, Johnny Brown (2x),
(Now) who do you chose, Johnny Brown
Who do you choose, Johnny Brown

Editor:
I believe that I learned this song from a casette tape of African American folklorist, singer, musician Ella Jenkins. However, I'm not certain about the name of that tape.

Here is how I taught this song:

The group forms a circle with one person in the middle. The middle person doesn't sing but acts out specific motions indicated by the song's lyrics. If the middle person is a male, use the name "Johnny Brown". If the middle person is a female, use the name "Jenny Brown".

On the words "fold one corner" ("fold the other corner") - the middle person acts like he or she is folding a blanket. On the words "Show me your motion", the person performs some movement or dance motion. When this line is repeated, the rest of the group attempts to exactly imitate that motion. On the words, who do you choose, the person in the middle remains in the center, closes his or her eyes and covers eyes with the left hand. At the same time the person in the middle spins around pointing a finger of his or her right hand with the right arm extended. At the end of the song, the person who is pointed to becomes the new middle person. The former middle person rejoins the circle, and the game immediately starts again from the beginning.

****
LITTLE JOHNNY BROWN (Version #3)
Little Johnny Brown
Lay your comfort down
Little Johnny Brown
Lay your comfort down
Fold it in a corner,
Johnny Brown
Hoot! Hoot! Hoot!
Fold it in a corner,
Johnny Brown
Show us your motion
Johnny Brown
We can do your motion
Johnny Brown
Now choose a friend [or "Take it to a friend]*
Johnny Brown
[game starts again with the new "Johnny Brown"]
-elementary school age children; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jfLIALSuk4

Editor:
This is a modified version of the traditional "Little Johnny Brown" game song (see version #1). The children form a circle and walk counterclockwise around one person standing in the center. The counterclockwise walking is the same as that done in the game "Musical Chairs". On the words "fold it in a corner" , the center person soots down and folds the small blanket and remains on her knees next to the blanket.

*"It" here is a "comfort". The word "comfort" isn't standard American English, but it refers to a large blanket whose purpose is to keep a person warm, and therefore comfortable.

The phrase "Hoot! Hoot! Hoot! in this version which is sung with an accompanying hip/butt switching and rhythmic jumping action was probably added just for fun. It doesn't appear that the person in the center does this.

On the words "show us your motion", the center person stands up and does a rhythmical dance step or another movement. On the words "we can do your motion" the other children attempt to exactly imitate the movements that the center person continues to do. One the words "now choose a friend", the center person arbitrarily walks toward a person forming the circle and gives her or him the blanket. That person becomes the new "Little Johnny Brown".

The former Johnny Brown takes that person's place in the circle. The new Johnny Brown moves to the center and the game immediately begins again.

Here's that video:

Johnny Brown

carolannf1 | April 05, 2010
Kids playing a game Called Little Johnny Brown

****
LITTLE JOHNNY BROWN (Version #4)
[Actions: Children form circle and perform the directions given in the song]

Little Johnny Brown
Lay your blanket down
Little Johnny Brown
(get it girl)
Lay your blanket down
Now you fold one corner,
Johnny Brown
Now you fold another corner
Johnny Brown
Fold another corner,
Johnny Brown
Fold another corner,
Johnny Brown
You go pick your partner
You go pick your partner
Go pick your partner
Go pick your partner
Allright, float like a buzzard, y'all
I want you to float like a buzzard, y'all
Float like a pretty, pretty buzzard, y'all
Float around like a buzzard y'all
SHOW OFF YA MOTION! *
Johnny Brown.
Let me see your motion.
Johnny Brown.
- Uploaded by spottedgirl on May 25, 2008 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UK8E2z4xivE [lyrics in uploader's summary statement]

Editor:
This version of "Little Johnny Brown" is more uptempo and modernized than version #1. Unlike version #1, this is a circle game with no one in the center. Each child forming the circle has her or his own blanket.

* The video ends at this point. I added the rest of the words to this game song, based on version #1.

On the words "Now go pick a partner", the guitar plays the notes to the words "Johnny Brown" and the children leave their blankets on the ground and arbitrarily walk toward another person forming the circle. It doesn't appear that any action is done with a partner and no action is done with the folded blanket. My sense is that this is a modification of the original game song's performance action in which there was one person in the center who then picked the next center person by standing & dancing in front of him or her, and then handed that person the blanket.

On the words, "float like a buzzard", the children flap their arms like a bird while walking single file counter clockwise around the circle. On the words "show off your motion", each child does his or her own dance or another movement.

Although the technical quality of this old video is poor, the content is high quality. Because of its folkloric value, I'm reposting it here.

Little Johnny Brown (float like a buzzard)

Uploaded by spottedgirl on May 25, 2008

****
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN
Ladies and gentlemen, children too
This brown girl
She gonna boogie for you
She gonna turn all around
She gonna wear her dresses up above her knees
She gonna shake her fanny just as much as she please.
I never went to college.
I went to school.
But when it comes to boogie,
I can boogie like a fool.
You go in out, side to side.
You go in out, side to side.
Hey pretty baby
How about a date
I’ll meet at the corner
About half past eight
Hands up!
Tachie Tachie Tachie
Hands down!
Tachie Tachie Tachie!
Sans Boots!*
Tachie Tachie Tachie
Hands down!
Tachie Tachie Tachie!
Sans Boots!
-Barbara Ray (African American female), memory of childhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1950s; collected November 1997 by Azizi Powell and corrected by a phone conversation with Barbara Ray in August 2009.

Editor: This corrects the example that I posted on this thread in 2009: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123101 "We wear our hair in curls"

I initially misremembered this example and wrote the incorrect version on that Mudcat forum. Since then I have received this version from Barbara Ray (telephone conversation 2009) and also found Barbara's written survey, and my notes on that survey which confirm that this is the version of this rhyme that Barbara recalled from her childhood.

Here are some brief comments about this rhyme:
The "never went to college" verse is based on a 19th century African American song called "Old Jesse" which is included in Dorothy Scaborough's On The Trail Of Negro Folk Song. This is not the same song as "Uncle Jesse".
**
Notice the similarities between "Ladies & Gentlemen" and several verses that are found in "All Hid" (Version #2) found above and verses of "Sally Died" found below.

**
Also, a version of "Down Down Baby" found in http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100653 (posted by Guest jenna on October 1, 2010 contains a very similar "Ladies & Gentlemen" verse.

**
In addition, click http://www.mudcat.org/jumprope/jumprope_display_all.cfm for similar rhymes.

****
LiTTLE SALLY ANN (Version #1)
Little Sally Ann
sittin in the sand
a weepin and a cryin
for a nice young man.

Rise, Sally, rise.
Wipe your weepin eyes.
Now turn to the East
and turn to the West.
And turn to the very one
that you love best.
-Multiple sources, including Azizi Powell's childhood memories of Atlantic City, New Jersey in the 1950s

Editor:
The "sittin in the sand" works for Atlantic City because of the sand near the ocean. I recall this game as being exclusively played by girls {about 5-12 years old}. No chair or handkerchief was used. The girl in the center of the circle was always called "Sally". "Sally" hunched down near the ground, with her eyes closed as if she were crying {though she made no sound}. The other girls forming the circle chanted the words in sing-song voices while they held hands and walked counter clockwise around the circle. On the words "Rise Sally rise", the girl in the center of the circle would stand up, and pretend to wipe her eyes. She would then close her eyes, and cover them with her right hand, and extend her left arm, and point her finger as she turned in the middle of the circle. The person who she was pointing to at the end of the song became the new "Sally" and the game started all over again with no interruption.

Girls who participated in the game song groups that I facilitated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area knew this song as "Little Sally Walker/sittin in a saucer". That was the first time I'd heard what is probably the most common version of this song.

I happened to talk to a youngish woman {35 year old} from Georgia who told me that she remembers playing this song when she was growing up and the girl in the middle didn't close her eyes but picked some one she liked to be the next person in the middle. I believe that the closing your eyes and turning around form of selecting the new middle person is a new strategy. I believe that strategy says a number of things about the culture of children and their lack of trust in other members of their peer group...

****
LITTLE SALLY ANNE (Version #2)
The game I played as a child in the mountains of Virginia as a young "colored girl" at the colored school was: Little sally Anne sittin in the sand weeping and a crying for a handsome man rise sally rise wipe ya dirty eyes put ya hands on ya hips let ya backbone slip shake it to the east shake it to the west shake it to the one you love the best shake it up shake it down shake it all way round
-Ney L.; 9/22/2007

Editor:
"Colored people" used to be a referent for those people who are now formally called "African Americans" and who are also informally called "Black Americans" (though the referent "Black American" may also refer to other people of African descent beside African Americans).Outside of the United States, in Europe and Australia, for instance, the word "Black" also refers to people of non-African descent. And in South Africa, at least during apartheid times, some people who are called Black in the United States would be considered "Coloured" and not Black. Confused? Well, racial categories really don't make a lot of sense. If you're interested in reading about the terms that have been used as referents for African Americans, this article is a good starting place: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American

For an example of the play performance for "Little Sally Ann", see the first game in the video posted under "Johnny Cuckoo".

****
SALLY WALKER (Version #1)
Leadbelly speaking

"Now this is another little children's play song. They gonna play, and they gonna put one inside the ring, and they all gonna be going around and they gonna sing. And this one in the ring is sitting down in a chair. They gonna give this one in the chair a hankie. And when they holler, "Rise, Sally, rise, wipe your weeping wyes", she's gonna rise out of that chair. And when they say, "Fly to the east, and fly to the west, fly to the one you love the best", she gonna fly and catch one that's going round the ring and catch him by the hand. Gonna put him in the ring, and he's gonna sit down in that chair where Sally got out of. Now here's what they gonna sing ehile they all go round the ring."

Little Sally Walker sitting in a saucer,
Weeping and a-moaning like a little turtle dove.

Rise, Sally, rise, wipe your weeping eyes,
Turn to the east, turn to the west
Turn to the one you love the best.

"Now, it's gonna be Jimmy Walker, now that's a little boy. Don't care who get in that ring. It's gotta be Walker."

Little Jimmy Walker etc.

Little Charlie Walker etc.

Little Jenny Walker etc.

Little Wally Walker etc.
-
Editor
It seems the children's real first names {actually the nicknames of their first names} were used with Walker being the constant last name.

Also, "ring" means "circle". "Circle games" were called "ring games".

Notice the use of "props" such as the chair and the hankie (handkerchief).
- arrangement: Huddie Leadbetter from Smithsonian Folkways 40044

Editor:
This song is included in the "Play Parties Song and Dance" examples.

****
LITTLE SALLY WALKER (Version #2)
Little Sally Walker
Sittin’ in a saucer
Cryin and weepin'
Over all she has done.
Rise up on your feet
And wipe your cheeks
Turn to the East;
Oh, turn to the West.
And put your hands on your hip
And let your backbone slip.
Oh, shake it to the East
Oh, shake it to the West
And shake it to the very one
That you love the best
-Bessie Jones (Georgia Sea Isles) ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJVnuQEhfCU&feature=related

Bessie Jones indicate that there are more than one way to play "Little Sally Walker".

See the video above for Johnny Cuckoo. In that video, Bessie Jones sometimes sings "stand on your feet and wipe your cheeks" instead of "rise Sally Rise/wipe your weeking eyes".

Also, compare this example with the lyrics and performance instruction for Little Sally Walker version #4).

****
LITTLE SALLY WALKER (Version #3)
Little Sally Walker
Sittin in a saucer
A weepin and a cryin for
a nice young man.
Rise, Sally rise.
Wipe your weepin eyes
Turn to the east and turn to the west
[And] turn to the one that you
love the best.
-Multiple sources, including Pittsburgh, PA in the 1970s

****
LITTLE SALLY WALKER (Version #4)
Little Sally Walker, an African-American version of a children’s game song (as played by Anna Robinson in the mid 1950's; who is now in her 60's).

Little Sally Walker
sittin’ in a saucer,
weepin' and cryin’
cause nobody loves her.
Rise Sally rise
wipe your weepin’eyes
put your hands on your hip,
and let your backbone slip.
Oh, shake it to the East;
Oh, shake it to the West.
Shake it to the very one
that you love the best.

The game of Little Sally Walker is for ages 7 – 12 Here's a description of the action that accompanied this rhyme:
Prior to song starting- Girls form a circle; one girl is chosen to be “Sally”
1st line- "Sally" sits down on the inside of the circle (as if sitting in a saucer) and pretends to weep and cry; the rest of the circle walks counter-clockwise holding hands and walking to the song’s beat

2nd line & line 3 -“Sally” remains inside the circle but now rises to stand in the center part of the circle and does what the rhyme is saying(wipes her eyes); the rest of the group is now standing still and claps their hands and stomps their feet to the beat.

3rd line & 4th line -Sally now stops and puts her hands on her hip and moves her hip into a dip and the girls in the circle who performed this rhyme stand still while "Sally" in the middle performs a movement.

As the rhyme progresses the children forming the ring try to exactly imitate Sally's movements (they shake their hips to movements the same time Sally does) on the words to the East the hips move to the right, and on the words to the West the hips move to the left. -Still standing in front of whoever Sally may stop in front of "Sally" continues doing the same dance or movement of her hips that she did previously.

5th- On the words you love the best Sally is standing still and facing the girl she stopped in front of, now the game is over; the former “Sally” rejoins the ring, and the new Sally immediately enters the center of the ring and the game begins again. When both boys and girls play this game together the game takes on a little more interest.
-Anna R.; 5/8/2008

Editor:
Anna R., thanks for sharing the words and the performance instructions of Little Sally Walker as you remember them. My recollections in the 1950s in New Jersey of the related circle game "Little Sally Ann" are similar to yours that children older than 6 years old played this game. However, I think the usual ages for girls and boys playing this game was somewhere around 6-9 years old. That said, nowadays, my experience has been that "Little Sally Walker"/"Little Sally Ann" and other circle games with songs are rarely played by children who are older than pre-school ages. Also, it's been my experience in New Jersey and Pennsylvania that children don't decide to play these games on their own. Instead they are usually initiated by pre-school teachers, and, on rare occasions, by parents at special events such as birthday parties for children under six years old.

Ann R, what I found most interesting about your play instructions was that "Sally" didn't cover her eyes and turn around while pointing so that she would accidentally select the next person in the middle of the circle. I can imagine that when girls and boys played this game together it would be more interesting since a girl standing in front of a boy and picking him could imply that she liked him {as more than a friend}. The same would be true if a boy who was the center person stopped in front of a girl. By the way, what name was given to a boy who stood in the center of the ring {circle}?

In my opinion, the accidental selection process is more democratic, since in the purposeful selection process, a child's popularity is a big factor as to when she or he is selected or even if she or he is ever selected to be the center person. In contrast, with the accidental selection process, a person never knows when she or he will be picked to be the center person since it's just by happenchance that she or he is the person the center person is pointing to at the end of the song. Furthermore, as a result of my experiences facilitating after-school groups for children ages 5-12 years old, I found that some children really don't like to be selected as the center person in these kind of circle games because they are afraid of being the center of attention as so often-in school and in other play activities-that results in being teased.

The real world of children is competitive in so many ways that we adults may not realize. The center person's movements end up being another testing ground when we adults might of thought of it as just a play opportunity. During the after-school activities I facilitated, another child would quickly take the place in the center of the ring if the child who was picked was reluctant to be that center person. One of the joys of my experiences working with those groups of children over time was seeing how certain children who had been reluctant to face their peers in the center of the ring, eventually became eager to be the center person. I believe this was so because no only did they gain confidence in themselves, but, based on their experiences in the group, they knew that other group members wouldn't tease them. This may have partly been because adult staff made it known that their was zero tolerance for teasing, and partly because the group had developed loyalty toward its group members.

Cocojams readers, what are your recollections about this game and other circle games? Are these kinds of games still being played by children in your community? Please send in examples and comments to Cocojams!

****
LITTLE SALLY WALKER WAS WALKIN DOWN THE STREET (Version #1)
Little Sally Walker was walkin down the street.
She didn’t know what to do so she stood in front of me.
I said ooh girl do your thing.
Do your thing, Stop!
I said ooh girl do your thing.
Do your thing, Stop!
-African American girls, about 7-9 years old, (Pittsburgh, PA), 1999; collected by Azizi Powell, 1999

Editor: "Little Sally Walker Walkin' Down The Street" is an updated version of the old British game song "Little Sally Walker" (Little Sally Waters). This updated game is one of the few children's game songs that some teens and young adults (usually female but sometimes also females & males) still enjoy playing. Other examples of such games are "Here We Go Ride That Pony" (found on this page); "Down By The Banks of the Hanky Panky" and "Stella Ella Ola" (found on http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes

Here's a description of the action that I observed in this version of "Little Sally Walker Walkin' Down The Street" :

Prior to song starting- Girls form a circle; one girl is chosen to be “Sally”

1st line- "Sally" walks around the inside of the circle; the rest of the circle stands still and claps their own hands and stomp their feet to the song’s beat {in re-creations of this rhyme I've directed children to move around the circle counter-clockwise holding hands for this part of the rhyme}

2nd line & line 3 -“Sally” remains inside the circle but stands facing a girl who is part of the circle and does a dance or movement like jumping jack; the rest of the group continues to stand still and clap their hands and stomp their feet {for re-created versions of this rhyme, for this line I've directed children to stop circling and stand still while clapping hands and stomping their feet to the beat}

3rd line-on the word “Stop!” Sally dramatically freezes her movement
(the girls who performed this rhyme in 1999 stood still while "Sally" in the middle performed a movement). When I've taught this rhyme to other children, I direct the children forming the ring to try to exactly imitate Sally's movements and then freeze their movements the same time Sally does.

4th line-Still standing in front of the same girl, "Sally" continues doing the same dance or movement she did previously; see notation about my directions for re-creation of this rhyme

6th- On the word "Stop!", the game is over; the former “Sally” rejoins the ring, and the new Sally immediately enters the center of the ring and the game begins again

Note: my "re-creation directions" are largely based on the way that I saw this rhyme performed in 2005. The rhyme was exactly the same and the rhyme was performed by basically the same age African American girls in the Garfield section of Pittsburgh (which is quite a distance from the Northview Heights section of that city)

Here's a video of this game:

itsthemama3 | November 06, 2008
A game that the girls will play 4ever...and then come home and sing it in the shower!!!

****
LITTLE SALLY WALKER WAS WALKIN DOWN THE STREET, (Version #2)
I was a counselor at a camp about three years ago, and the campers (good-natured high school students) played a surprising amount of games during break time. Not surprisingly, they weren't all innocent little rhymes. For example, Little Sally Walker has been reincarnated! She's now a circle game, with the chant:

"Little Sally Walker,/walking down the street.
She didn't know what to do, so/she jumped in front of me and said:
'Hey, girl, shake that thing,/shake that thing like it ain't no thing.
Come on, girl, shake that thing,/shake that thing like it ain't no thing."
-LNL ; 01 Mar 04; Children's Street Songs; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=4300#1114943

****
LITTLE SALLY WALKER WAS WALKIN DOWN THE STREET, (Version #3)
Little sally walker little sally walker walkin down the street she didn't know what to do so she stop in front of me and said hey girl do your thang switch hey girl do your thang switch {you don't switch the second time oh and by do your thang means to do a dance move}
-Ashley; 3/16/2008

Editor: Here's a video that demonstrates one way this game is played:

Little Sally Walker game

12meggiebear | March 18, 2008

**
Here's another video that shows "Little Sally Walker" actually switching positions with the person who she stands in front of:

Little sally walker.

brookiiexx3 | April 25, 2009

****
LITTLE MISS SALLY WALKER (Version #4)
Little Sally Walker
Walkin down the street.
Hey. Hey.
She didn't know what to do
So she jumped in front of me and said:*
Go'n' girl. Do your thang **
Do your thang
And stop.
Go'n' girl. Do your thang
Do your thang
And stop.
Turn to the east.
Turn to the west.
Turn to the one that you love the best.
- tracedog14 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5IAevICrL1Y ; December 23, 2008,

* Or "she said"
** Gon' is a contraction of "go on". "Thang" = "thing"

Editor:
This performance combines the new way of playing "Little Sally Walker" (in the beginning) with an older way of playing that game (at the end). An even older way of doing the "turn to east and turn to the west and turn to the (very) one the you love the best" is not to cover & close your eyes but to purposely pick the person you want to replace you in the middle.

Little Miss Sally Walker

tracedog14 | December 23, 2008

**
Here's another version of Little Sally Walker (Walking Down The Street)

Little Sally Walker :)

by AnnaGraceBananaFace on Feb 25, 2009

Editor's note:
I think that the multiple number of "Little Sallys" toward the end of that second video might have been done to make sure that as many children as possible got a turn in the middle. Whenever I've seen this game played, there has only been one "Sally" in the middle at a time, and only one person she or he stands in front of. Note that the name "Sally" doesn't change if a boy happens to be picked to go in the middle. However, the female name serves as documentation that this originated as a girls only game.

The second featured "Little Sally Walker (walkin down the street)" video demonstrates how the African American influenced "show me your motion" children's circle (ring) games are still being played. As is the case with the "traditional" show me your motion games, in this updated version, the one who is picked to join the person in the middle is supposed to exactly imitate the dances and/or other movements that the middle person does. Of course, this rule is waived with very young children.

****
VIEWER COMMENT: LITTLE SALLY WATERS
I found this site while searching for the origin of "Shi Boo Ya Role Call" and, although I'm not African-American, recognized many of these rhymes. Here's the version of "Little Sally Walker" that I remember. Little Sally Waters Sitting in a saucer Cry Sally Cry Wipe off your eyes. Turn to the East, Sally Turn to the West, Sally Turn to the very one that you -like -best! ...I'm 60 years old and learned [this] on the playground in Waterbury Connecticut in the early 50s.
-Ellen R.; 1/9/2007

Editor:
I want to clarify that my initial purpose for starting this website was to post contemporary (1950s to date) examples of African American children's rhymes & cheers. However, shortly after I started collecting rhymes (and to a large degree because of my involvement with the online international discussion forum Mudcat Cafe), I expanded Cocojam's scope to include contemporary examples of English language rhymes regardless of the racial/ethnic background of their performers.

That said, I am still very interested in whether there are racial differences in the words, words, structure, and performance of children's rhymes & cheers. I also am very interested in how rhymes and cheers change or remain the same in different countries and over time. And I believe that other folks may also be interested in this type of information now and in the future. Those are the reasons why I encourage Cocojams readers to include demographical information.

**
I believe that the title "Little Sally Waters" is the earliest version of "Little Sally Walker" and "Little Sally Ann". From my reading, i gather that this song originated as a British marriage and/or fertility ritual.

**
Examples of "Shi Boo Ya Role Call" (given as Shabooya Roll Call" or some other similar spelling) on Cocojams Cheerleading Cheers page: http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-cheerleader-cheers

****
LONDON BRIDGE IS FALLING DOWN
First verse:
London bridge is falling down
falling down
falling down
London bridge is falling down
My fair lady.

Second verse: [this was sometimes omitted]
Take a key and lock her* up
lock her* up
lock her* up
Take a key and lock her* up
My fair lady.

Third verse
Here comes the hammer to chop off her* head
chop off her* head
chop off her* head
Here comes the hammer to chop off her* head
My fair lady.

* "Her" was changed to "him" if a boy was the one caught, However, even if the "prisoner" was a boy, the ending was always "My fair lady".
-traditional; Azizi P.; memories of childhood, Atlantic City New Jersey, 1950s

Play instructions:
Two children stand apart, facing each other and holding their hands high over their heads. The other children form a vertical line and move underneath this "bridge" while the two children sing the song. When they sing the words "chop off their head" for the first time, the two children's arms come down and they "capture" the person who is going under the bridge at that time. While they sing the rest of the second verse, the two people move their arms in a swaying motion keeping the captured child in the middle. At the end of the verse, the game starts again, with the captured child taking the place of one of the people forming the bridge. Children don't want to be captured, so they move faster when the song gets close to the first "chop off her {or his} head line.

See more information about this song on this Mudcat thread: http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=111431&messages=43#2347958
RE: Mention of Death in Children's Rhymes

M,N
MANUEL ROAD (Example #1)
Go dung ah Manuel Road galang boy
Fi go bruk rock stone
Go dung ah Manuel Road galang boy
Fi go bruk rock stone
Bruk dem one by one...Galang boy
bruk dem 2 by 2...Galang boy
Finga mash nuh bawl

Rememba ah play wi a play...
sometin suh.....
-Ack33; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZNgBzxrKVc&feature=related ; 2008

Editor: This song is also known as "Emmanuel Road" (Jamaican stone passing game)

Here's another comment from that video's viewer comment thread:
romierenae - Oh, I remember playing this when I was little. The object of the game is not to get your fingers smashed by the "rock stone".

If you weren't paying attention and left your fingers laying in the circle. The person passing the rock to you has the right to smash your fingers. (Playfully of course).

Memories...
.
**
Here's that video:

brandeely | January 15, 2007
This is the stone game. It's a traditional Jamaican childhood game played in rythm to a patois song.

-snip-
"Manuel Road" is a Jamaican Mento song. Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlWvrrT77fo for another version of this song. A brief informative summary is included with that video.

Also, click http://www.jambalayah.com/node/931 to find this video and a jambalayah edited version of its viewer comment thread.

Also, visit http://musicwork.wordpress.com/2008/12/16/the-stick-passing-game/ for instructions for a stone passing game that is from South Africa, although the poster learned it in Bosnia, The words to a South African song that was sung with this game were posted by another commenter who also learned it from the South African man. However, the first poster wrote that this game can be played to the familiar to Americans pop song "We Will Rock You".

****
MANUEL ROAD (Example #2)

Uploaded by axyswebs on Oct 6, 2009

****
MISS JENNIA JONES
William Wells Newell, in "Games and Songs of American Children," originally printed in 1883, has a section on Jenny, which seemingly started out in Scotland as Jenny (my) Jo (sweetheart). Since the description is earlier that the 1927 book, which apparently borrows from Newell, I reproduce newell's text:

In one version, here is his description of the game in which Jennia dies.
A mother is seated. Miss Jennia Jones stands behind her chair, or reclines on her lap as if lying sick. A dancer advances from the ring.

"I've come to see Miss Jennia Jones,
Miss Jennia Jones, Miss Jennia Jones,
And how is she today?"

"She's upstairs washing,
Washing, washing-
She's upstairs washing,
You cannot see her today."

The questions are repeated to the same air for every day of the week, and the reply is that Miss Jennia Jones is ironing, baking or scrubbing. She is then represented as sick, or worse, and finally is dead, which announcement is received with sighs of deep grief. The dancers of the ring then discuss the costume in which she will be buried:

"What shall we dress her in,
Dress her in, dress her in,
What shall we dress her in-
Shall it be blue?"

"Blue is for sailors
So that will never do."

"What shall we dress her in,
Shall it be red?"

"Red is for firemenn
So that will never do."

Question repeated for other colors-
"Pink is for babies,
So that will never do."

"Green is forsaken,
So that will never do."

"Black is for mourners,
So that will never do."

"White is for dead people,
So that will just do."

"Where will we bury her?
Under the apple tree."

After the ceremony of burial has been completed, the ghost of Miss Jennia Jones suddenly arises-

"I dreamt I saw a ghost last night,
Ghost last night, ghost last night,
I dreamt I saw a ghost last night,
Under the apple-tree."

The ring breaks up and flies with shrieks, and the one caught is to represent Miss Jennia Jones.

W. W. Newell, 1883 (1965, Dover), "Games and Songs of American Children, No. 11, pp. 63-66. Newell provides music for two tunes, one from Maryland, No. 174, pp. 243-244.

Newell remarks that the game was once a love play, in which the heroine pines because her cruel parents refuse an offer for her hand.
- posted in http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=76201 Origin of Aunt Jenny Died?
by Q ; December 4, 2004

Editor:
My thanks to Q for that information. My thanks also to masato sakurai
for the following information, same thread, same date, "Jenny Jones," see Iona & Peter Opie, The Singing Game (Oxford, 1985, pp. 254-60)."

I feel very confident in indicating that this singing "play" is one of the sources of the African American movement rhyme "Aunt Jenny Died". An example of that rhyme is posted above.

Also see examples of "Jenny Jenkins" and "Jane Jenkins" posted below.

****
MISS ONION DIED
Editor: I'm posting this example here because of its similarity to Aunt Jenny Died.

We used to play a related game when I was young. Players sit in a circle. The leader starts with the statement to player on her left who questions her, then turns to the player on his left in turn. All players continue the action or contortion until it returns to them the next time when they *add* another action or contortion. The object is to not laugh, but maintain an air of solemn sympathy.

"Old Miss Onion Died."
"How did she die?"
"Closing one eye"
...
[next time round]
"Old Miss Onion Died."
"How did she die?"
"Mouth awry"
...
"Waving goodbye"
...
"One leg held high"

There might have been more; don't remember.

Did anyone else ever play that one? Guess I had a weird enough childhood.
-Judy Cook; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=76201 Origin of Aunt Jenny Died?; February 17, 2005

Editor:
See the entry below for "Miss Jennia Jones" which I believe is the probable source of these singing games.

Also see the entry for "Jenny Jenkins" posted below.

****
MISTER RABBIT
Call: Mister Rabbit, Mister Rabbit, your ears are
mighty long!
Response: Yes, my Lord, they put on wrong.
Group: Every little soul must shine, shine, shine
Every little soul must shine!
Call: Mister Rabbit, Mister Rabbit, you’re in my cabbage
patch!
Response: Yes, my Lord, I won’t come back.
Group: Every little soul must shine, shine, shine
Every little soul must shine!

Call: Mister Rabbit, Mister Rabbit, your tail’s mighty white.
Response: Yes, my Lord, I’m goin’ out of sight.
Group: Every little soul must shine, shine, shine
Every little soul must shine!

Editor:
Although “Mister Rabbit” is included in several older books on American folk songs, its African American origin is rarely noted. The song is also rarely written in a call & response style. Yet, I think that this style fits it best. This song is actually a story about a rabbit who is caught by in a farmer’s vegetable garden. How does he explain what he's doing there? How quickly can he think up responses to the farmer’s comments? How does he get away from the farmer to the safety of the bushes?

I'm absolutely no expert on these old, old games. But I vaguely remember reading an article that I unfortunately can't find that talked about these rabbit songs being sung as a prelude [before] children played running and chasing games. If that was so, then one child would be chosen as the farmer and another child would be chosen as the rabbit. The "farmer" and the "rabbit" would chant their respective lines and at the end of that song the farmer would chase the rabbit. If the rabbit arrived at a previously designated place, he or she was safe, and another rabbit was selected [and perhaps another farmer].

This may or may not be true. But it sounds right to me.

:o)

I like to think about the hidden, deeper meanings of children's rhymes and game songs. This song is one of several rabbit songs that used to be very well known among African American children {and probably other American children}. However, few African American children in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (or I would imagine any other urban area) know this song now. Most urban children may have never seen a rabbit in real life besides in the petting zoo. Few urban children know what a cabbage patch is. We might be more familiar with the term “small vegetable garden”, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve ever seen one. When a song’s references become outdated or foreign to a population, people are less likely to sing the song, and may eventually forget it all together.

It seems to me that “Mister Rabbit” may have been more than entertainment. Or, to put it another way, the type of entertainment that enslaved Africans taught their children also helped them develop the survival skill of being mentally alert and knowing how to talk their way out of trouble. Given the oppressive nature of slavery and post slavery societies, being able to talk your way out of trouble was sometimes a matter of life and death. “Thinking fast on your feet” was certainly a survival skill that enslaved people needed and it is still needed today.
-Azizi Powell, [written mostly in 2003]; posted 5/22/2006 in response to Babbette's 5/22/2006 request. Thanks, Babbette!

Also see another rabbit song "Rabbit In The Pea Patch" that is presented "down thread" (below on this page)

O,P
ONE EYE OPEN

Editor-This is my transciption of a portion of a gospel song that I happened upon on YouTube. That video is found below. I'd never heard this hide & go seek chant before. Nor had I heard that gospel song before. I don't know of any other hide & go seek chant that is included in a gospel song.

The words that I'm not sure of are followed by a question mark in brackets. The words in parenthesis are what the soloist or some other designated person said. The words in italics are neither spoken nor sung.

.If anyone knows this chant or one like it, please contact me at cocojams17@yahoo.com. Thanks!

Soloist speaking - (I remember we used to sing an old song for hide & seek in the South.)

Soloist & choir singing the words that the person who is "It" in hide & seek would say
One eye open
Open Open Open
Tika Tika Toben [?]
Toben Toben Toben
All God's children
Come to heaven.
Won't be back
Ttill ten or eleven.
Are you ready?

One person shouts No!
Soloist speaks (Somebody said no. When somebody said no you look around and you see somebody hiding in the bushes, and then we said)
Soloist and choir singing the words that the person who is "It" in hide & seek would say

Big mama Little mama
Hanging up clothes.
Big mama stepped on Little mama's toes.
Did it hurt?
Yeah!
I said Did it hurt?
Yeah! Yeah!
-end of the hide & go seek portion of this gospel song-
-from "Shake The House" sung by Bishop Dr. Henry Porter and Westcoast Gospel Chorus of Florida in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHiC62rDBGY&feature=related
(video posted by mirg231 on April 21, 2008; transcription of "One Eye Open" by Azizi Powell, 5/24/2010

Editor: This chant is similar to the "All Hid" chant that is found on this page. The line "Big mama little mama/hanging up clothes" reminds me of the choosing "it" rhymes "My mother and your mother (were hanging up clothes) that are posted on Cocojams' Choosing It page http://www.cocojams.com/content/choosing-it-rhymes. Furthermore, the "Won't be back/till ten or eleven" line in "One Eye Open" reminds me of the "What time is it/Mr Wolf?" line that is found in the "I'm going downtown to smoke my pipe" examples that are also found on this page.

Unfortunately, a video of "Shake The House" as performed by Bishop Dr. Henry Porter and Westcoast Gospel Chorus of Florida was removed from YouTube.

****
PAW PAW PATCH
Examples of this song are presented in this second regardless of their title.

PAW PAW PATCH (Version #1)
As sung by Burl Ives:

Where, oh where is dear little Susie?
Where, oh where is dear little Susie?
Where, oh where is dear little Susie?
Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch.

Chorus:
Pickin' up paw-paws, put 'em your pocket ("pawket")
Pickin' up paw-paws, put 'em your pocket
Pickin' up paw-paws, put 'em your pocket
Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch.

Come along, boys, and let's go find her.
Come along, boys, and let's go find her.
Come along, boys, and let's go find her.
Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch

Repeat Chorus:
- posted in http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37840 Origins: Paw Paw Patch, anyone? by Uncle_DaveO January 31, 2009.

****
PAW PAW PATCH (Version #2)
This is the version of "Paw Paw Patch" that I remember learning as a child in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in the 1950s.

Where, oh where is dear little Susie?*
Where, oh where is dear little Susie?
Where, oh where is dear little Susie?
Way down yonder in the paw-paw patch.

Pickin up paw paws puttin em in the basket
Pickin up paw paws puttin em in the basket
Pickin up paw paws puttin em in the basket
Way down yonder in the paw paw patch

-snip-

* The name was changed to the name or nickname of the person playing that featured role (the person hiding from the rest of the group in the designated "paw paw patch".
I remember "Way Down Yonder In The Paw Paw Patch" as a movement game. I probably learned it from adults at summer "Vacation Bible School" and I recall only playing this game under adult initiative.

One girl was selected some way or the other to be "Susie", although I don't remember how. The rest of the children would then sing the verses in unison, looking for Susie and then picking up "paw paws" and putting them in our "make believe" baskets. I remember imagining those baskets to look like Easter baskets.

Around 2002, I taught this song to children who participated in the Alafia (ah LAH fee ah) Children's Ensemble game song groups that I faciliated in two Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area communities. However, I changed "paw paw patch" to "apple trees" because apples were much more familiar to those children and to me than paw paws.

Here's a delightful video of "Paw Paw Patch"

Pawpaw Patch - Sean McCollough and Friends

Uploaded by seanmccolloughmusic on Dec 8, 2010

Recorded at the CD release party for Sean's family album, This Is Our House. Sean McCollough (banjo, vocals), Steph Gunnoe (guitar, vocals), Greg Horne (fiddle), Maria Williams (bass, vocals). Willa McCollough plus Roxie, Lucy and Eliza Abernathy (hand motions). Also featuring Will Durman in front of the stage with his wonderful contribution.

-snip-

Here's another version of "Paw Paw Patch" which uses the phrase "Way down on" instead of "way down yonder on"...

PAW PAW PEELING
Here oh here comes pretty little Nellie (3x)
From way down on the Paw-Paw Bend.

She got choked on a Paw-Paw peeling (3x)
Way down on the Paw-Paw Bend.

Bye an' bye we'll go an' see her (3x)
Way down on the Paw-Paw Bend.

Come along boys an' let's go meet her (3x)
Way down yonder in the Par-Paw patch.

-snip-
Paw Paw Peeling was noted in "Syllabus Kentucky Folk-Songs," 1911, p. 38, Shearin and Combs (reference in Randolph).

The verses in Randolph from Mrs Gaylord Hancock, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1933, from Mr. T. W. Painter of Jonesboro, Arkansas, "who played the game in the '80's."
The tune is from the old hymn "Where Now Is Good Old Elijah?" Vance Randolph, "Ozark Folksongs," vol. 3, # 553, pp. 364-365.
-Posted in http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=37840 y Lyr Req: Paw Paw Patch, anyone? by Guest Q, June 21, 2003

****
PEEKABOO
Peekaboo [said in a sing song voice to a young baby while covering your eyes with both of your hands]
I see you! [said while quickly removing your hands and smiling at the baby]

Repeat multiple times
-traditional game played with babies in the USA; posted by Azizi Powell, 4/11/2010

Editor: Here are excerpts from two emails about "Peekaboo" that I received from lives in France.

Email #1
"About the hide and seek game, here, usually, the one seeking must count up to a previoulsy agreed number, the others say "Ça y est!" (~"it's done") when they've hidden. When the seeker is far, they call "coucou!" which is ~ "peekaboo" for you.

Actual event: one of my friends' friend was once invited by his American boss who had a baby grandchild and my friend's friend's wife started to play peekaboo with the baby, the lady saying "coucou" (which sounds more or less as "cuckoo") to the baby as she would to a French baby except that she didn't know what cuckoo meant and she didn't understand why her husband's boss family had their faces growing colder and colder"...
-Monique (France) 4/10/2010

Email #2
"About Peekaboo, I wonder if we're all fully aware that some words we feel natural in our mother tongues aren't universal. I suppose you feel (not think, thinking is something different) "peekaboo" to be the "natural" thing to say to a baby as I feel "coucou" to be the "natural" thing for it and this is probably the reason why we just utter it naturally without thinking for a second that it could be said otherwise in another language"..
- Monique (France) 4/12/2010

Editor:
Thanks for your comments, Monique! If I understand you correctly, it seems as though Peekaboo (Coucou) in France is used for two different games. However, in the United States, anyway, I don't think that phrase is used for the running game called "Hide & Go Seek". In the United States "Peekaboo" is a stationary game that an adult or an older child)d plays with a baby. The adult (child) covers their eyes with their two hands (or covers their face with a shirt) and says "Peekaboo". Then they quickly remove their hands or remove the shirt or whatever they are hiding their face. At the same time, they say in a playful (and definitely not scar voice) "I see you!". This is repeated a number of times. The adult (or whoever is playing with the baby) also helps the baby mimic this rhyme and the accompanying movements for this rhyme by putting the baby's hands over her/his eyes while saying the words to this rhyme. "Peekaboo" is a fun "game" that reinforces bonding with a baby while it helps plant the seeds that music can be fun.

I gathered from your story about the friend playing with the American boss' baby that this "American way" was the same way the French adult played that game.

****
PIZZA PIZZA DADDY O (Version #1)
Mary had a baby (Tanya, Sherry, etc.)
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
How you know it?
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Cause she told me
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
What's his name
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Jessie James
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
What's special?
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Toilet tissue
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's jerk it
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's swim it
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's skate it,
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's freak it,
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's twine it
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's bat it
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's fan it
Pizza Pizza daddy-o
Let's spin it
Pizza Pizza daddy-o.
-from http://www.folkstreams.net/context,201; DVD- "The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes" by Bob Eberein and Bess Lomax Hawes

Editor: The actions that are indicated in this movement rhyme are done with accompanying motions. For instance, "Let's skate it" means to act like you are skating, "Let's bat it" means to act like you are swinging a baseball bat", "Let's fan it" meaning "act like you are waving a fan", "Let's swin it" means to act like you are swiming, and "Let's spin it" means to spin your body around. "Twine", "jerk", and "freak" are specific dance moves which later became the names of specific R&B dances.

Here's a YouTube video clip from that film:

Pizza Pizza Daddy-O

Uploaded by mediageneration on Dec 12, 2009

From the DVD- The Films of Bess Lomax Hawes available from http://www.media-generation.com

**
Unlike children's singing games such as "Little Sally Walker", it appears that the girl's name was changed to the name or nickname of the girl who was in the center of the circle for that turn.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/10/r-songs-sources-of-playground-rh... for a post about the R&B source of this playground rhyme, the 1954 R&B song "Anne Had A Baby".

****
PIZZA PIZZA MIGHTY MOE (Version # 2 of Pizza Pizza Daddy O)
Evalina?|
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
Well, have you seen her?
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
She’s got a wooden leg
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
But can she use it?
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
Oh yes, she use it.
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
Well, do she ‘buse it? Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
I know she use it. Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
Well, can she ball it?
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
I say ball it!
Pizza, Pizza, Mighty Moe
-Bessie Jones, Step It Down, pp 63, 64, published in 1972

Editor:
Bessie Jones indicated that she learned this rhyme from elementary school children in Brunswick, Georgia "a few years ago", which might make that around the late 1960s, even the publication date of the book. Bessie Jones describes this singing game as play between two characters, "Evalina" and "Pizza". However, it seems as if "Pizza Pizza Mighty Moe" is used as a refrain by a group or another person responding to comments made by one member of the group (in this case a girl named Evalina). This rhyme is built around a discussion about whether a person can really dance ("ball") or not. One way of saying that a person can't dance well is that they have a "wooden leg". Although I've never heard this expression, my interpretation of the question "Can she 'buse it (abuse it) is that this is another way of asking "Can she really dance?". When a person stretches the limits of a dance by adding new steps or dancing the old steps really well, she or he may be said to be "abusing" the dance.

****
PIZZA PIZZA DADDY O (Version #3)
Directions: “Children form a circle with one child in the center. On each repeat of the words, “Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O, all the children in the center do the foot pattern as described below:

Piz jump and land with feet apart

za jump and cross feet, with left foot in front of right

piz jump and land with feet apart

za daddy jump and cross feet, with right foot in front of left

O jump and land with feet apart

Let's end it.

This pattern always begins and ends with “jump and land with feet apart. Beginning with the words “let’s jerk it, the center child becomes the caller, and the group responds by singing and imitating the caller. The “center” can decide the motions to be imitated and determine the length of the game. The game ends with the words “let’s end it” as the enter child puts his hand over his eyes, spins around, and points to a new player to be “it”. Note, if the center child is a boy, the name “Georgie” is used at the beginning. And his girlfriend ‘s name is “Jenny James”.”

Georgia has a boyfriend
Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Cause she told me
Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
What’s his name?
Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Jesse James
Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Where does he live?
Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Up a hill
Pizza, Pizza Daddy-O
Let’s jerk it
Jerk it, jerk it Daddy-O
Let’s swim it
Swim it, swim it, Daddy-O
Let’s twist it
Twist it, twist it Daddy-O
Let’s end it
End it, end it, Daddy-O
-Eleanor Fulton & Pat Smith, Let’s Slice the Ice, (MMB Music, Inc., St. Louis , Missouri , p 50, 1978)

Editor:
The authors credit Black American children from multiple states as the source for the rhymes in the book. However, no specific state mentioned for individual rhymes. he “jerk”, “swim” and “twist” were all popular dances from the mid 1960s}. It also should be noted that smart aleck rhyming two part phrases such as "What's your name?" "Jessie James" were popular among African Americans and other Americans in the 1970s and earlier. The term "Daddy O" comes from hip jazz talk and was also popular in the 1970s.

In the question "What's his name" , the word "his" refers to the baby.

****
PIZZA PIZZA DADDY O (Version #4)
Deshawn had a baby
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
What’s his name?
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
Jesse James
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
What it look like?
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
Like a monkey
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
Do the monkey
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
Do the jerk
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
Who do you choose?
Pizza Pizza Daddy O
-Barbara Michels, Bettye White, Apple On A Stick, (New York,1983, Coward-McCann , p 27).

Editor:
The source of the book’s rhymes is given as African American children from St. James Episcopal Church and St. James School , Houston , Texas. No directions were given for this singing game. However, the drawing that accompanies this examples depicts pre-teen girls standing & forming a circle, singing and clapping their hands. This game is probably performed like the directions given in version # 3. The "monkey" and jerk" are names of R&B dances.

****
PIZZA PIZZA DADDY O (Version #5)
(Jimmy) is having a birthday party.
Pizza, pizza, Daddy-o!
How do you know?
Pizza, pizza, Daddy-o!
Cause I saw it!
Pizza, Pizza, Daddy-o!
Let’s jump it!
Jump it, Jump it Daddy-o!
Let’s shake it!
Shake it, shake it, Daddy-o!
Let’s hop it!
Hop it, hop it, Daddy-o!
Let’s twist it!
Twist it, twist it Daddy-o!
Let’s monkey it!
Monkey it, monkey it, Daddy-o!
Let’s boogie it!
Boogie it, boogie it, Daddy-o!
-Linda Gross and Marian E. Barnes, Talk That Talk, (New York, 1989; Simon & Schuster, p. 444-445, from the Philadelphia (PA) School at 25th and Lombard in South Philadelphia).

Editor:
This example is listed in the section of the book titled "Jump Rope Rhymes". However, I believe that the editors are uising "Jump Rope Rhymes" as a generic phrase for all types of children's rhymes. This singing game appears to provide an excuse for the girls to show off their dancing ability. While the commands "let's jump it!", "let's shake it", and "let's boogie it" refer to dancing movements, "the twist" and "the monkey" are actual names of R&B dances.

In 1990, I saw "Pizza, Pizza, Daddy-O" performed as a hand clap rhyme by two African American elementary school age cousins of mine from Philadelphia (PA) during my family reunion in Atlantic City New Jersey. The sisters did scissors jumps (jumped with their feet crossing each other in the front one the words "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O". The changed the words to then current dance steps, but unfortunately, I didn't record or transcribe their words and I've forgotten which dances they said.

-snip-

Here's another video of Pizza Pizza Daddy O

Pizza, Pizza, Daddy-O

temkes | October 17, 2007
Here are my second graders being silly on the hayride at the pumpkin farm.

****
PIZZA PIZZA DADDY O (Version #6)
Annie has a boyfriend. [Participants stand in circle without holding hands]
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o [On the words "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O:, participants do a "scissors jump"-jump crossing their feet in front.]
How you know it?
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o
Cause she told me.
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o
Let's swim it [make swimming motions]
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o
Let's rope it [Imitate twirling a rope above their head]
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o
Let's duck it. [hold their nose and duck down like they are jumping underwater]
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o
Let's end it. [turn around in a circle with their arms raised over their head]
Pizza Pizza Daddy-o
-2nd grade students (African American girls & boys, ages 8 & 9 years), Fort Pitt Accelerated Learning Academy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 6/16/2010

Editor:
In this version, "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O is performed as a circle game with no one in the center of the circle.

I observed this performance of Pizza Pizza Daddy-O when I attended and helped with a last day of classroom school pizza party. My daughter was the children's teacher, and I've been a substitute teacher at that school so the children knew me. The school's first grade students and the school's music teacher were also in that classroom at that time, as their music teacher brought them into the second grade room so that they could perform another song for me that they had recently learned.

The first graders didn't appear to know the "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O" song. I wondered about this, and later that day my daughter informed me that the (African American) music teacher had taught the second graders "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O", but hadn't taught that song to the first graders.

The music teacher was present while the students performed "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O". She nodded her head during the performance to indicate that the students were performing the song "right". I don't think that the students knew that they could change the words of that song by substituting other dances or movements for those they had learned or adding to the dances and movements that were taught them.

Note how the scissors jump movement is the same as the movement described in the late 1970s version featured as Version #2 on this page. Also note how the words "__ has a baby" has been changed to the more 'politically correct' "Annie has a boyfriend". It should also be mentioned that the featured name "Annie" doesn't alternate in this song (and the featured name doesn't appear to alternate in any other version of this song).

It's also worth noting that "Annie" usually isn't a common name any longer in contemporary (post 1980s) African American schools. Imagine if the song featured a common African American female name such as "Kayla". If the words to the song were "Kayla has a boyfriend" this might be considered a taunting rhyme or maybe not, since having a boyfriend might be considered a status thing even for girls as young as these students were.

I was interested to see that the second grade boys enthusiatically joined in that performance of "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O". If they follow prevailing practices, in two years or less, I predict that these boys will be much less likely to voluntarily perform such non-competitive games as it's likely that they will consider to be just for girls.

Visit http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes to read about & see videos of the mildly competitive circle handclap games "Stella Ella Ella", "Quack Diddly Oso", and "Down By The Banks Of The Hankey Panky" which-unlike other handclap games-many boys 9 years of age and older seem to have no problem continuing to play.

**
Here's one of several videos of groups of children performing "Pizza Pizza Daddy O. These videos appear to be from the same school. Note: This is not the school where my daughter teaches). It's interesting to see that the children do a "scissors jump" in their performance of "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O" & chant the exact same words with other motions as students in my daughter's class did. This suggests that a "standard version" of "Pizza Pizza Daddy O" has been printed & is being disseminated among American elementary school music teachers.

Robertson Pizza Pizza Daddy O.MP4

LincolnMusic185 | June 04, 2010

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PLAYMATE
See examples of this rhyme/song on Cocojams' Handclap Rhyme Page

****
PUNCHANELLA (Version #1)
Look who's here
Punchinella Punchinella
Look who's here
Punchinella in the shoe.

(Oh) What can you do
Punchinella Punchinella
What can you do
Punchinella in the shoe.

(Well) We can do it too
Punchinella Punchinella
We can do it too
Punchinella in the shoe.

Who do you choose
Punchinella Punchinella
Who do you choose
Punchinella in the shoe.
-Azizi Powel; childhood memories, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s

Comments: Punchinella was (and still is) a circIe game with one person in the middle. Girls and boys (from about 5 years to 12 years old) played this game together, indoors or outdoors. For the first verse, the children forming the circle, held hands and walked counterclockwise around the person in the middle who does not sing. For the second verse, the group stands and may clap their hands to the beat while singing this verse.

When the group sings "What can you do?" "Punchinella" begins to do some kind of movement or dance. For the third verse, "Punchinella" continues doing that movement/dance, and the group tries to exactly imitate her or him. For the last verse, the group holds hands again & again starts moving counterclock wise around the circle. At the same time, "Punchinella" closes her (or his) eyes, covers them with her or his hands and twirls around the center of the circle pointing to children forming the circle. The child that "Punchinella" was pointing to becomes the new "Punchinella". The old "Punchinella" moves to the place that the child was standing, and the game starts again immediately.

Punchinello" is a character from the 18th and 19th Italian "Punch and Judy" shows.
In Europe, an early version of the lines "Punchinella Punchinella/ Punchinello in the shoe" was "Punchinello funny fellow/ Punchinello funny you".

Click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49743&messages=31 for even earlier versions of "Punchinello" and for commentary about that circle game. Even more history about the Italian origin of the Punchinello character can be found at http://www.jesterbear.com/Aradia/Punchinello.html

The "Punchinella in the shoe" phrase may come from the Buster Brown brand of shoes that were popular in the USA in the early/mid 1950s. A picture of Buster Brown & his dog Tige was inside the shoe. I also remember shoe salesmen giving out Buster Brown comic books with the sale of those shoes. For more info on Buster Brown, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buster_Brown

Here's a video version of this game song:

Punchinella

gdozet Uploaded on Sep 27, 2008

Ms. Thuet's and Ms. Friedman's 2nd graders singing and playing.

Click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoF7plxr3RU for a video of the Wee Sing - Grandpa's Magical Toys video version of "Punchinello". That version includes the words "Punchinello funny fellow/Punchinello funny you".

****
PUNCHANELLA (Version #2)
Look who's here
Punchinella 57
Look who's here
Punchinella in the shoe.

(Oh) What can you do
Punchinella 57
What can you do
Punchinella in the shoe.

(Well) We can do it too
Punchinella 57
We can do it too
Punchinella in the shoe.

Who do you choose
Punchinella 57
Who do you choose
Punchinella in the shoe.
-African American girls & boys, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, collected by Azizi Powel; 1997
-snip-
When I began a game song groups for children in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1997, I started to share the game song "Punchinella" with the children. However, I learned that they already knew this song and played it the same way that I had. The only difference in the words is that the children sang "Punchinella 57".

My guess is that the "Punchinella 57" comes from the "Heinz 57" slogan which is widely known in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. The Heinz corporation is the maker of 57 varieties of catsup and other products.

****
PUNCHANELLA (Version #3)
Hi, I was checking out this site and got so excited reading all of these cheers. It is so cool to see the cheers I did as a child in Birmingham, AL and see how differently they are done in different parts of the county. I am 26 and I try to pass down as many cheers as I can remember to my nieces and my daughter (8,6,and 2). Here's one:

Look who's here punch-a-nella, punch-a-nella
Look who's here punch-a-nella in the shoe
Oh what can you do, punch-a-nell, punch-a-nella
What can you do, punch-a-nella in the shoe
We can do it too, punch-a-nella, punch-a-nella
We can do it too, punch-a-nella in the shoe
Now choose your partner, punch-a-nella, punch-a-nella
Choose your partner, punch-a-nella in the shoe

We would all stand in a circle and one person would be in the middle and we would clap and stomp. The person in the middle would perform a dance during the line "oh what can you do...", then the group would imitate that dance on the next line. Then the person in the middle would cover their eyes and spin around during the line " now choose your partner...." and whomever they landed on at the end of the rhyme went into the circle next.
-Joi; 3/23/2008

****
PUNCHANELLA (Version #4)
There's one that my niece does with her friends all the time. It's called punchanella. It goes: (the girls form a circle, and then one girl goes in the middle of the circle, so all attention is on her)

Look who's here punchanella punchanella,
look who's here, punchanella in the shoe.
Oh what can you do punchanella punchanella,
what can you do punchanella in the shoe (this is when the girl in the middle of the circle does whatever she wants, like a dance etc.)
Oh we can do it to punchanella punchanella,
we can do it to punchanella in the shoe, (this is the part when the girls that formed the circle imitate what the girl in the middle was doing)
Oh choose your partner punchanella punchanella,
choose your partner punchanella in the shoe (this is when the girl puts one hand over her eyes, and spins around in the circle)
S (S)- T(T) - O(O)- P(P) spells STOP (this is when the girl that was in the middle stops spinning, and whomever she is in front of is the next to go in the middle of the circle, and it starts over again)
-Kia; 6/4/2008

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PUNCHANELLO (Version #5)
Here in NZ we learnt it at school and played it much the same way.
I'm not sure if we played it at Brownies as well but at GLB (Girl's Life Brigade) we didn't.

Our verses were:
Look who is here Punchinello funny fellow,
Look who is here Punchinello funny man.
(sung as each new child enters the circle)

What can you do Punchinello..........
(child in centre does an action)

We'll do it too Punchinello..........
(everyone does the action)

Who do you choose..............
(child in centre closes eyes, points and turns around and when the singing stops, the person being pointed to becomes the next Punchinello)

I'm guessing it was taught to student teachers at Teacher's Training Colleges, for it to be so widely known and so similar all around the world. That's how 'Cookie Jar' arrived in NZ.
- Little Robyn, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49743&messages=31 Play-party game 'Punchinello' , November 7, 2010
-snip-
NZ= New Zealand
Italics were added by me to highlight this sentence as I think it's a very probable explanation for how the "Look who's here" versions of the circle game "Punchinello" (or "Punchinella") became so widespread. That said, read the comment below for another very probable theory of how "Punchinello" could have been spread to New Zealand.

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PUNCHANELLO (Version #6)
I grew up in Jamaica, West Indies, playing this game at school during recess. In the 1950s, the words we sang were:

Who is coming next, Punchinello, little fellow?
Who is coming next, Punchinello, little dear?

What can you do, Punchinello, little fellow?
What can you do, PUnchinello, little dear?

We can do it too, Punchinello, little fellow
We can do it too, Punchinello, little dear.
-Guest, Guest, , http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49743&messages=31 Play-party game 'Punchinello' , February 02, 2011

****
PUNCHANELLO (Version #7)
We used to sing and play this game when I was going to Primary School in New Zealand adout 1947.

We would choose a person to be Punchinello, form a circle around him/her and sing
"What can you do Punchinello Funny Fellow
What can you do Puchinello Funny Man"
Punchinello then does some action which everyone follows singing
"We'll do it too Punchinello Funny Fellow
"We'll do it too Puncinello Funny Man"
then
"Who do you choose Punchinello Funny Fellow
"Who do you choose Punchinell Funny Man"

This may have been brought from America by the American Servicemen
who were in New Zealand in the early part of WW11
-Guest, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49743&messages=31 Play-party game 'Punchinello' , January 13, 2012

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PUNCHANELLA (Version #8)
Punchinella - a group chant (group randomly selects the first person to go, usually by volunteer who stands in the center singing along too)

Group: look whos here punchinella, punchinella
look whos here punchinella in tha shoe! Oh what can you do Punchinella, punchinella? what can you do punchinella in tha shoe! ( person in the middle does a dance as her solo and the group imitates it the best they can while saying...)
Group: ...oh we can do it too, punchinella punchinella. we can do it too punchinella in tha shoe!|
oh choose your partner punchinella, punchinella. choose your partner punchinella in tha shoe! (soloist covers eyes with one hand and points her finger, while spending around in the middle of the group.)
Group:....S-T-O-P! speelllss STOP! (soloist stops and whoever her finger is pointing at is the next person to go in the middle. )
-brittany L., 3/16/2012

Q,R,S
RABBIT IN THE PEA PATCH
Rabbit in the pea-patch, shoo-lye-love (sing sentence 5x)
Shoo-lye love, my darling

You love Miss Sally (substitute another name;5x)
Shoo-lye-love, my darling

You stole my partner, shoo-lye love (5x)
Shoo-lye-love, my darling

But I’ll get another one, shoo-lye-love (5x)
Shoo-lye-love, my darling

Pretty as the other one, shoo-lye-love (5x)
Shoo-lye-love, my darling
-traditional African American children's game song ; recorded in Old Mother Hippletoe record; posted by Azizi, 2004

Editor:
“Rabbit in the Pea-Patch” is one of a number of rabbit songs that used to be well known among African Americans, particularly those from the Southern part of the Untied States. Few urban African Americans, from the South or the North know these rabbit songs anymore.

A “pea patch” is a small garden where peas are grown. This song doesn’t tell any story. It is actually just an excuse for dancing. Another name for couple dance songs such as these is “play party” songs. Some African American and Anglo-American religious groups that were opposed to couples dancing permitted couples to hop and skip around to songs such as this one, because they could consider it a game instead of a dance. According to Kate Rinzer, author of the Old Mother Hippletoe record’s notes, this song was sung in unison by people who were watching the game being played. Boy and girl couples performed this “play party game” by skipping hand in hand around a lone boy. The boy would eventually “steal” a girl of his choice from one of the couples. The person who is now alone becomes the new “rabbit in the pea-patch”.

****
RING AROUND THE ROSEY [a Louisiana version]
Ring around a rosey, pocket full o' posies,
Light bread, Sweet bread, Squat!
Guess who she told me, tralalalala,
Mister Red was her lover, tralalalala,
If you love him, hug him!
If you hate him, stomp!
-Source: Lomax and Lomax, 1939 Southern States Collecting Trip, from Wiergate, Texas: (Sec. 13, Merryville, LA and vicinity)

This rhyme was posted on this Mudcat thread: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=49672#750915 "Ring Around The Rosey's History?" on 7/18/2002 by Dicho.

Editor:
I refer to this version of Ring Around The Rosey as "Louisiana Ring Around The Rosie".
See http://www.cocojams.com/content/text-analysis-green-sally for my comments about the possible connections between this version and the African American children's game "Green Sally Up" whose words are found on this page.

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SALLY DIED
Slow
CALL: Sally died! (Girl in center chants)
Response: How did she die? (Girls in circle chant)
CALL: Oh, she died like this! (Leader strikes death pose)
Response: Oh, she died like this! (Circle mimics)
CALL: Sally died!
Response: How did she die?
CALL: Oh, she died like this! (New death pose)
Response: Oh, she died like this! (Circle mimics)
CALL: Sally living!
Response: Where's she live?

Double time, unison

Oh, she lives in a country called Tennessee!
(Scissors jump)
She wears, short short dresses up above her knee!
She can shake that thing wherever she goes!
Hands up, tussie, tussie, tussie, tus! (Raise hands)
Hands down, tussie, tussie, tussie, tus! (Hands ankle height)
Turn around, tussie, tussie, tussie, tus! (Full turn jump)
Touch the ground, tussie, tussie, tussi, tus!
(Touch ground with jump)

Oh, she never went to college! (Circle chants while leader whirls in place with hand covering eyes, other arm extended)
She never went to school!
But I found out
She was an educated fool!
The girl in the center stops abruptly on "fool", pointing to the new leader
Washington D. C., schoolgirls, recorded 1976 at the Smithsonian Institution Festival Of American Folklore,Washington, D.C., [Band 2, "Ring Games and Jump Rope" of Old Mother Hippletoe: Rural and Urban Children's Songs ; New World Records. 1978; Record Notes Kate Rinzler ]

-snip-

Previously on this page and on a Mudcat forum thread had an example of "Aunt Jenny Died" that I attributed to Barbara Ray, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 1950. I'm now uncertain if my remembrance of that rhyme came from her in part because I can find no written confimation of it and because I may have misremembered that rhyme as the example of "Ladies & Gentlemen". An example of that rhyme is found below. I have written confirmation of that rhyme from that informant.

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SEA LION
Chorus
Hey hey hey! Sea Lion
Won't you be mine?
You won't do nothin,
Sea Lion,
But starch and iron! Sea Lion!

Verse 1
Way down yonder, Sea Lion!
about the sun, Sea Lion!
my mother called me, Sea Lion,
a sugar plum, Sea Lion!

Chorus

Verse 2
Old rabbit hip. Sea Lion!
Old rabbit hop. Sea Lion!
Old rabbit bit, Sea Lion!
my turnip top!, Sea Lion!

Chorus

Verse 3
If I live, Sea Lion!
to get 21, Sea Lion!
I'm gonna marry, Sea Lion!
somebody's son. Sea Lion!

Chorus

Verse 4
See that man, Sea Lion!
with the blue shirt on. Sea Lion!
You'd better leave, Sea Lion!
that man alone! Sea Lion!

Chorus
-from Nina Millen, editor "Children's Games From Many Lands"(Friendship Press, New York,1965; Revised Edition pps.161,162)

This song is listed as a children's "game from the Untied States with words set down by Thelma Moorer, Christine Steward; and Music by Gertrude Smith Jackson; Southern Christian Institute, Edwards, Mississippi".

Editor:
I'm curious if there's any connection between the repeated phrase "Sea Lion" in this children's game song and that same phrase (or one that sounds it) in the "Sea Lion" song or the "See Line" song that Nina Simone has popularized. A video of that song and an edited YouTube comment thread can be found on Cocojams' sister website Jambalayah at http://www.jambalayah.com/node/432.

Also, click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=33719 for a discussion that I participated in about the meaning of the phrase "Sea Lion" in the "Nina Simone song".
Although I initially though that "sea lion" was folk etymology for the Biblical phrase "Selah", I came to agree with several people who asserted that 1. that song originated among the Gullah people of Georgia or South Carolina 2. it either started out as or became a children's song and 3. the phrase "sea lion" or "see line" was originally "she lyin" (as in one person who is a tattle tale saying one thing and another person saying "she lyin"). For instance one person says "She drink coffee" (something that children weren't supposed to do) and the person accused of this action response with "she lyin".

All of the verses in this game song are similar to other floating verses found in numerous African American folk songs. True to African American traditions regarding folk songs of that time, I would expect that this song is open ended (meaning more verses can be added until people tire of the song).

Unfortunately, this book does not include any play directions. However, also true to African American traditions, I would expect that children {and other age groups?} clapped, and stomped their feet, and imitated the movement of the rabbit.

For what it's worth, apart from this song's inclusion in that book, to date, I've not found any other mention of this song in any other books of children's game songs, and I've never seen this game performed.

****
SEVEN ELEVEN
7-11 and ah 42.
How many pop-ups
can you do?
Wiiith ah 1- 2- 3- 4 (The word “with” is elongated and spoken with emphasis)
5-6-7-8.
7-11 and ah 42.

7-11 and ah 42.
How many bongos
can you do?
Wiiith ah 1, 2, 3, 4.
5, 6,7, 8.
7-11 and ah 42.

7-11 and ah 42.
How many jumping jacks
can you do?
Wiith ah 1, 2, 3, 4.
5, 6,7, 8.
7-11 and ah 42.

Repeat the rhyme as many times as you wish, each time substituting a new movement and doing the movements starting from “1” to the count of “8” {or any number you wish to end with.
-African American girls & boys, about 8-12 years {Ammon Recreational Center; Pittsburgh, PA} Collected by Azizi Powell, 1999, posted by Azizi, 2004

Editor:
This rhyme, like a number of other Cocojams rhymes and cheers, was collected as a result of cultural presentations my associates and I conducted in 1999 for groups of children who reside in Allegheny County {Pittsburgh area} public housing developments. As part of our presentation on African American children’s recreational music, we asked the children to sing and perform any game songs, handclap rhymes and cheers that they knew. The children liked the fact that we audio taped their performances and played it back to them.

This text version of “Seven Eleven” can’t possible capture its catchy tune and the energy that the girls and boys put into its performance. You need a videotape to do it justice.

“Pop-ups” was the children’s term for the exercise commonly called “sit-ups”.

“Bongos” was the children’s term for a rhythmical side-to-side hip shaking motion.

“Jumping Jacks” is commonly used term for an exercise that combines clapping your hands above your head while you jump with your feet apart and then together.

What does "7 11 and ah 42 mean? I failed to ask the children this question. “7-11” is the name of an all-night convenience store in Pittsburgh. I guess the store’s name means that it is open from 7 o’ clock in the morning to 11 o’clock at night. But I'm not sure that this anything at all to do with this rhyme. It's possible that the number "42" was used because the #2 rhymes with the word "do". In that case, any number ending in two could have been used. Maybe the words don’t mean anything but just sound good together.

Adults always want to know the reasons for things. Maybe we should just accept this as it is and just chant it for enjoyment and exercise!

****
SHAKE IT BACK TO NEW ORLEANS
Alabama, Mississippi
Alabama New Orleans
Alabama Number 3!
We're gonna shake it, shake it, shake it baby
Shake it, shake it, shake it baby
Shake it, shake it, shake it baby
Shake it back to New Orleans.
- vincebates; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wg-0tOVOKws&feature=relmfu , May 3, 2012

Shake It Back To New Orleans

Published on May 3, 2012 by vincebates

-snip-

Here are the Instructions for this game that I observed from watching this video:
The group forms a wide circle. Before the game begins, members of the group are given a number. Depending on the number of people playing this game, more than one person can have the same number. The game begins with the group strutting counter clockwise around the circle and singing. A designated person who may not be actually be moving around the circle, calls out a random number. When a number is called out, the person or people with that number move to the center of the circle and do a dance or shaking movement while everyone else* sings "We're gonna shake it, shake it, shake it baby" . On the lines "shake it back to New Orleans", the person or people in the center quickly move back to the circle and the game begins again with no pause.

*The people in the center can also sing the "shake it, shake it, shake it, baby" lyrics. However, it's been my experience with ring games that the person in the middle usually does the actions and doesn't sing.

-snip-
I've never seen or read about this game song before. Given its lyrics and its performance activity, my guess is that this game is of African American origin. I would love to know more about it. Has anyone else ever played this game or one like it? Contact me at cocojams17@yahoo.com Thanks!!

-snip-
I just found this song on this pdf file http://www.nwcentral.org/files/Jim%20Gill%20song%20lyrics%20sheet%202010... "Some Jim Gills Recordings" 2005

The words to that song are the same except for the line "Alabama" [call out a number]. Instead of a number being called out that line is given as "Alabama Mississippi". No performance instructions are included for this or for any other song shown on that page. In my opinion, calling out a number for a person or persons to dance in the middle of the circle is a core part of the game as it is what makes it fun to play.

The song on that page is given as "traditional". "Traditional" is a catch all category for songs without any known composers. I really dislike that label because it doesn't provide any information what so ever about which nation or ethnic group the game/song comes from. As I indicated above, given the use of African American vernacualar, emphasis on shaking it body movement, and the song's performance activity, I feel very comfortable categorizing "Shake it back to New Orleans" as a game song that is of African American origin.

It's possible that "Shake It Back To New Orleans" was adapted as a ring (circle) game from the words to the song "House Of The Rising Song". Here's an excerpt of that song:

With one foot on the platform,
And one foot on the train
I'm goin' back to New Orleans
To wear the ball and chain.

I'm going back to New Orleans
My race is almost run;
I'm going back to spend the rest of my life
Beneath that Rising Sun.

Source: http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=2727

****
SHIMMY SHIMMY KO KO PA
See "Down Down Baby" in Cocojams' Handclap Rhymes page

****
SISSY IN THE BARN [Bon Ton]
Sissy in de barn,
O jine de weddin'
Sweetes' li'l' couple I e'er did see,
O Bon Ton, put yo' arms around me!
Say, Ii'l' Sissy, Won't you marry me?

Get back, gal.
Get yo' arms from 'round me!
All those sassy words you say,
O Bon Ton, put yo' arms around me!
Say, Ii'l' Sissy, Won't you marry me?

Get back, boy,
Don't put yo' arms around me!
All those foolin' words you say,
O Bon Ton, put yo' arms around me!
Say, 'li'l' Sissy, Won't you marry me?

"Sissy" is affectionate for "little Sister" [This is the author's statement and her performance directions follow.]

Directions
Any number may participate. The players form a large circle with a boy in the center.
They clap hands on each beat throughout as they swing.
1. Boy in center advances in short, skip-like steps to a girl in the circle and stops in front of her on the words, "li'l' couple".
2. He catches girl's right hand in his.
3. They take position for social dancing.
4. They move to center and dance the "two step" inside the circle.
5. Pushes girl gently from him
6. Shakes finger in mock anger at girl, meanwhile skipping back to her.
7. Same as (2)
8. Same as (3)
9. Same as (4)
10. Reverse (5), i.e. girl pushes boy from her.
11. Reverse (6)
12. Use steps (2), (3), and (4) again.
13. At the conclusion of the above directions this girl and boy join the ring, some other boy goes to center and the dance is begun again.

This should be sung and danced gaily and not dragged out.
Altona Trent Johns Play Songs Of The Deep South (The Associated Publishers, Inc.; 1st edition; 1944

-snip-
Click this link for a post that I wrote which included sound files and additional examples of "Sissy In The Barn":
http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-evolution-of-game-song-sissy...

****
THIS-A-WAY VALERIE (Also known as "Strut Miss Lucy" and "Strut Miss Susie")
This-a-way, Valerie
Valerie, Valerie,
This-a-way, Valerie
All day long.

Oh, strut, Miss Lizzie
Lizzie, Lizzie
Strut Miss Lizzie
All day long.

Oh, here come another one
Just like the other one,
Here come another one
All day long.
Source for lyrics: http://www.folkstreams.net/context,201; assessed 3/8/2008

Editor:
An example of this game is found in the Pizza Pizza Daddy O video clip.

Visit http://www.scoutsongs.com/lyrics/thiswayvalerie.html for another example of this singing game.

****
STRUT MISS LUCY (Version #2 of "This Way Valerie")
(to the tune of "Shortnin Bread)

Editor: This example is a repost from this website: http://dragon.sleepdeprived.ca/songbook/songs3/S3_96.htm. I’m reposting this game here to help preserve & share knowledge of it for today’s children and for future generations.

"Thanks very much to Jean, Barb, and Gail, who all helped me to piece together this song.

The girls line up in two lines facing each other. Each girl grabs hands with their partner and move arms alternately forward and back while singing the verse:

This way Valerie, that way Valerie,

This way Valerie, all the way home.

Take a couple of steps back and the head couple do the next two verses while everyone else sings and claps their hands. The girl on the right side struts down the line doing any action she wants. When she gets to the ends she joins the line on the left:

Strut Miss Lucy, strut Miss Lucy,

Strut Miss Lucy, all the way home.

The girl on the left copies the actions of the first girl during the next verse and when she gets to the end she joins the line on the right.

Here comes another one, just like the other one,

Here comes another one, all the way home.
-snip-

Editor: Examples of the singing game "Here We Go Zoodio" use the same tune as "Here We Go Valarie" ("Strut Miss Lucy")

The hit American dance show "Soul Train" copied the format of this singing game to create the popular Soul Train line. However, on that show often both persons at the beginning of the two lines moved down the middle of the aisle at the same time. And instead of doing any action she or he wanted, the two people danced.

Click this link for a video of the Soul Train line: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9D7sXxlW8c

T, U, V
THAT'S THE WAY
and then there was a weird one:

(The first half is really slow, then you try to say the second part as quick as possible)
that’s the way, uh huh, uh huh
i like it, uh huh, uh huh
that’s the way, uh huh, uh huh
i like it, uh huh, uh huh
peace, punch, captain crunch
break the wall in the waterfall
boys think they know it all
they don’t, we do, girlfriend!
(there was a swinging hand grab during the that’s the way part, then you made a peace sign, a fist, saluted, and waved your hands in front of your face)
bippity; http://kateharding.net/2009/10/02/miss-lucy-had-friday-fluff/ Shapely Prose: November 4, 2009

Editor:
"That's The Way I LIke It" is lifted from the hit song by K.C. And The Sunshine Band.
This rhyme belongs to the Brickwall Waterfaill family.This example shows the evolution of this rhyme from a taunting hand clap routine to a motion imitative rhyme.

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/schoolyard-taunts to find numerous examples of Brickwall Waterfall that are chanted with handclap movements. Many examples of the closely related handclap rhyme “Bang Bang Choo Choo Train” are also found on that Cocojams page.

****
THAT'S TOUGH
Here's a bit of dialogue I recall. It could start whenever anyone had just complained about some misfortune, to which someone else would reply, "That's tough."
Then a third person would reply:
--What's tough?
And the dialogue between the latter two would continue:
--Life.
--What's Life?
--A magazine.
--How much does it cost?
--Ten cents.
--I've only got a nickel.
--That's tough.
--What's tough?

Da capo ad infinitum, or ad nauseam, as the case may be.

This dialogue was spoken, not sung. It had no punch line. The dialogue itself was the only joke. I suppose it was done to annoy or embarrass the person who had originally complained—a way of making fun of his complaint. Now that I reflect on it, it seems to be making the point that complaints are endless, if you indulge them. But I don't think I reflected that much when I was a kid.
- Jim Dixon; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82053&messages=25 Folklore: Where's your money? In my pocket ; December 22, 2005

****
THIS IS THE WAY TO WASH DADDY'S CLOTHES
This is the way to wash daddy's clothes, swish-swash, swish-swash, (bring imaginary clothes to your nose and sniff loudly, say "Ahhh!", smile, and lay the imaginary clothes down). Repeat with mommy's clothes, brother's clothes, sister's clothes (add grandma, grandpa, aunt, uncle, and cousins if you like). It's always the same until the last verse: "This is the way to baby's diapers, swish-swash, swish-swash" {the punch line is to make a terrible face when you sniff and start rubbing them again with a hurried "swish-swash, swish-swash"}.
-Ann N.; 4/29/2007

****
TIDEO
Editor: Each of the featured examples of this song are posted together regardless of their title. The word "Tideo" is pronounced "tie - dee -oh." "Tie" rhymes with the greeting word "hi".

TIDEO (Version #1)
Pass one window, Tideo.
Pass two windows, Tideo.
Pass three windows, Tideo.
Jingle at the window, Tideo

Tideo! Tideo!
Jingle at the window, Tideo
- lyrics as sung in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNBfj0PKkD0

Here's that video:

3rd Grade Music-Singing Game Tideo (Fairmont Anaheim Hills Campus)

Uploaded by fairmontschools on Jun 16, 2011 [California]

In this music activity, students experience 16th note rhythms in 4/4 meter, they sing in tune to a wide-range melody, and they work as a team.

Editor:
From http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/down-in-jay-bird-town--indiana-play-p... :
"Down in Jay Bird Town" is a version of "Tideo," a fiddle tune and play party song printed as early as 1911 in the Fournal of American Folk Lore, has a variety of similar names including Ti-De-O, Toddy-O, Jingle at the Window. Randolph suggests (Randolph, III, 313), on the authority of Lair, Swing Your Partner, that the name "Tideo" was corrupted from "Toddy-O" and that it derives from an old fiddle tune titled "I Love Sugar in my Toddy-O..

In England "toddy-o" refers to a strong whiskey and a "hot toddy" is a name given to a mixed drink that is served hot, believed to have originated in the 18th century to make the taste of Scotch more palatable to women. The first written mention of distilling Scotch whisky is in the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, 1495. In the US a song "Raw Rum and Toddy-O" or "Rum Punch and Toddy-O" appears in print as early as 1802.

****
JINGLE AT THE WINDOW (Version #2 of "Tideo")
Jingle at the window, Tideo,
Skip two windows, Tideo,
Skip three windows, Tideo,
Jingle at the windows, Tideo.

Jing-ling, jing-ling, jing-ling Jo,
Jingle at the windows, Tideo.
-Ruth Crawford Seeger, in American Folk Songs for Children, as posted by Guest Bob Coltman in http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97649 , Sail Away Ladies, January 4, 2007

Editor: Here's more information from Bob Coltman:
[Ruth Crawford Seeger]'s "ource was "Tideo," in William A. Owens, Swing and Turn: Texas Play-Party Games, Tardy Publishing Co, 1936....

The melody is not particularly close to the "Sally Ann"-style tune of "Sail Away Ladies," though it does bear some resemblance.

****
TIDEO (Version #2)
Pass one window, Tideo.
Pass two windows, Tideo.
Pass three windows, Tideo.
Jingle at the window, Tideo

Tideo! Tideo!
Jingle at the window, Tideo
- lyrics as sung in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNBfj0PKkD0

Here's that video:

3rd Grade Music-Singing Game Tideo (Fairmont Anaheim Hills Campus)

Uploaded by fairmontschools on Jun 16, 2011 [California]

In this music activity, students experience 16th note rhythms in 4/4 meter, they sing in tune to a wide-range melody, and they work as a team.

****
TIDEO (Version #3)
Soloist-Pass one window
Group- Tideo.
Soloist-Pass two windows
Group- Tideo.
Soloist-Pass three windows,
Group -Tideo.
Soloist-Jingle at the window
Group- Tideo

Soloist-Tideo
Group-Tideo
Soloist-Jingle at the window
Group- Tideo.

[repeat with a different call & response pattern]
- lyrics as sung in http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=zettSmxbB4c

Here's that video:

Tideo (Auditory Close)

Uploaded by gdozet on Oct 15, 2008

Mr. Minton's 6th Graders singing and playing the "Auditory Close Version" of "Tideo."

****
TIDEO (Version #4)
Skip one window Tideo
Skip two windows
Skip three windows Tideo
Jingle at the windows Tideo

Jingle Jingle Jingle Tideo
Jingle at the windows Tideo
- from http://jenniman.ehost-services147.com/Tideo.mp3

Editor: Here's a brief statement about this song from http://www.missjenni.com/mjmusic.htm :
"Tideo" - a simple traditional play-party song collected in Texas by William A. Owens
Texas Folk Songs 1950, 1976, Texas Folklore Society

Here's an "going under arms held in an arch" performance style for this song. The words are the same as those in Version #2.

"Tideo"

Uploaded by WildwoodKids on Nov 16, 2010

Jodan's 3rd grade class sings "Tideo."

-snip-

Editor: I've including an example of the dance song "Lead A Man" after these featured versions of "Tideo". I've done so because I believe that "Lead A Man" and other songs that include that "dideo" * refrain such as "Sail Away Lady" may be related to the "Tideo" song.

LEAD A MAN
Lead a man, di-dee-oe, lead a man, di-dee-o;
Lead a man, di-dee-oe, lead a man, di-dee-o;
You swin heads, di-dee-o, I swing feet, di-dee-o
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, walkin' on de ice, di-dee-o!

Ladies change, di-dee-o, ladies change, di-dee-o;
Ladies change, di-dee-o, ladies change, di-dee-o.
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, ain't dat nice, di-dee-o,
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, ain't dat nice, di-dee-o?

Oh my love, di-dee-o, oh my love, di-dee-o.
Oh my love, di-dee-o, oh my love, di-dee-o.
Ain't dat nice, di-dee-o, ain't dat nice, di-dee-o,

-snip-

[The title of this song is given as "Dance Song" in Dorothy Scarborough (assisted by Ola Lee Gulledge) On The Trial of Negro Folk Songs [Folklore Associates edition 1963; pp.115, 116; originally published by Harvard University press, 1925]

-snip-

*Since these songs were open ended, it wouldn't be difficult to imagine another verse being "Sail away ladies, di-dee-do, sail away ladies, di-dee-do".
-Azizi, posted in http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97649 Sail Away Ladies, December 31, 2006

Note: The song "Sail Away Ladies" includes the lines
Don't she rock die-dee-o,
Don't she rock die-dee-o,
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

-snip-
It's interesting that in later versions of "Sail Away Lady" (also known as "Don't She Rock Me", the word "dideo" was changed to "daddy o". For more information about & versions of "Sail Away Ladies" click on the Mudcat link that is given above.

W,X,Y,Z
WALKING ON THE GREEN GRASS
Walking on the green grass,
Walking side by side,
Walking with a pretty girl,
She shall be my bride.

And now we form a round ring,
The girls are by our sides,
Dancing with the pretty girls
Wo shall be our brides.

And now the king upon the green
Shall choose a girl to be his queen,
Shall lead her out his bride to be,
And kiss her, one, two, three.
Now take her by the hand, this queen,
And swing her 'round and 'round the green.

And now we'll go around the ring,
And every one we'll swing.

Oh, swing the king and swing the queen,
Oh, swing the king and swing the queen,
Oh, swing 'em 'ound and 'round the green,
Oh, swing 'em 'round the green.
- Source : W.W. Newell, Games and Songs of American Children, New York, 1883 (Dover reprint, New York, 1963), p. 228. ; posted by Azizi Powell on http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=80573 Lyr Add: Walking on the Green Grass ;
January 225, 2009

****
WATERFLOWER (Version #1)
Water-flower, water-flower,
Growing up so tall,
All the young ladies must surely, surely die;
All except Miss 'Lindy Watkins,
She is everywhere,-
The white folks say, the white folks say,
Turn your back and tell your beau's name.

Doctor, Doctor can you tell
What will make poor 'Lindy well?
She is sick and 'bout to die,
That will make poor Johnnie cry!

Marry, marry, marry, quick!
'Lindy, you are just love sick!

Johnnie is a ver' nice man,
Comes to the door with hat in hand,
Pulls off his gloves and show his rings,
'Morrow is the wedding-day.
-Altona Trent Johns, Playsongs of the Deep South (Washington, D.C, The Associated Press Publishers. Inc., 1944, pps 14-15)

**
Editor: This is a coed (girl & boy) ring game (circle game) that is played with one person in the center.

****
WALLFLOWER (Version #2)
The version my mother sang was -
Wallflowers wallflowers growing up so high
All you young ladies will surely have to die
[Except ----, she's the fairest of them all;
She can dance, she can sing,
And she can wear a wedding ring ]*
Turn, turn, turn again, turn your back to the wall again.

* I made the middle lines up, must have been something like that
A wallflower is an English flower (related to cabbage and radish) that can grow with very little soil, or even out of the cracks of old walls
A wallflower is also a girl without a partner at a dance.

Do you think that the link came before or after this game with its suggestion of dieing an Old Maid?
-Mo The Caller; 6/11/2006; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=100061 ; Water Wallflower & Brickwall Waterfall

****
WE'RE RIDING HERE TO GET MARRIED
[Tune: very similar to "Here we go round the Mulberry Bush"]

Directions: The girls form a horizontal line and stand facing boys who have also formed a horizontal line. In the 1st part of this singing game, the girls sing and skip four steps for each phrase toward the boys and the boys sing while skipping four steps for each phrase toward the girls. The singing game turns into a chasing game at the end of the song.

Girls:
We're riding here to get married
Married, Married
Riding here to get married.
Ah Rhythm Ah Diddee
Ah Diddee High Oh

Boys:
Who you gonna marry?
Marry, Marry
Who you gonna marry?
Ah Rhythm Ah Diddee
Ah Diddee High Oh

Girls:
We're gonna marry Johnny *
Johnny, Johnny
We're gonna marry Johnny
Johnny, Johnny
Ah Rhythm Ah Diddee
Ah Diddee High Oh

Boys:
How ya gonna get him?
Get Him, Get Him
How ya gonna get him
Ah Rhythm Ah Diddee
Ah Diddee High Oh

Girls:
We'll break the doors and windows
Windows, Windows
We'll break the doors and windows
Ah Rhythm Ah Diddee
A Diddee High Oh

Boys:
You'll get all dirty and greasy
Greasy, Greasy
You'll get all dirty and greasy
Ah Rhythm Ah Diddee
Ah Diddee High Oh

Girls:
We're not as greasy and you are
You are, You are
We're not as greasy as you are
Ah Rhythm A Diddee
A Diddee High Oh

Girls:
Are you coming? [Spoken loudly]

Boys:
NO! [Yelled]

* another boy's name can be substituted for "Johnny"

Part II:
When the boys yell "No!", the girls began to chase the boys. They are suppose to particularly focus on the boy whose name had been given in the chant. The boys run away. They are suppose to try to protect the boy whose name had been called from being caught by the girls. But, actually, when this game was played, the girls tried to catch any boy playing the game, and particularly focused on the boy who they liked.
-Barbara R. (African American female) remembrance of childhood in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the 1950s; collected by Azizi Powell, 1992

Editor:
My "informant" for this rhyme was a girlfriend/work colleague of mine, an African American woman, Barbara Ray, who responded to a written survey of children's rhymes that I had asked people to complete in 1992. Barbara remembers this from the 1950s Pittsburgh. She wrote that "When I was growing up girls and boys would sometimes play together. This was before boys started playing sports like little league softball and football. We were different ages but mostly elementary school age. Of course, the girls would pick the boys they liked the best to chase after. We played this on the sidewalk and in the streets when no cars were coming. Kids now days don't sing songs like this. They still play hide & go but it's just someone counting to ten and then the rest of the kids hiding. I think our way was more fun".

-snip-

I believe that "We're Riding Here To Get Married" is a variant form of the British children's game "Dukes A Riding' (Three Dukes). I also believe "We're Riding Here To Get Married" is related to the Georgia Sea Isle children's song "Johnny Cuckoo".

Do you know any of these game songs? If so, please share the versions that you know with Cocojams! Send your versions with comments about the decades you played the game and performance instructions to cocojams17@yahoo.com. Thanks!

****
WHAT'S THE TIME, MR WOLF (Also known as What Time Is It Mrs Witch)
"One player is chosen to be Mr Wolf (the name usually remains "Mr Wolf" irrespective of the gender of the player). Mr Wolf stands at the opposite end of the playing field from the other players, facing away from them. A call-and-response then takes place: all players except Mr Wolf chant in unison "What's the time, Mr Wolf?", and Mr Wolf will then answer in one of two ways:

If Mr Wolf calls a time of day - usually an hour ending in "o'clock" ("Three o'clock!"). The other players will then take that many steps towards Mr Wolf, counting the steps out loud as they go ("One, two, three!"). They then ask the question again.

If, on the other hand, Mr Wolf calls "Dinner time!" (or, occasionally, "Lunch time!" or "Midnight!") Mr Wolf will turn and chase the other players back to their starting point. If Mr Wolf successfully touches a player, that player becomes the new Mr Wolf for the next round."

-snip-
Some variants of this game are included on that Wikepedia page. See the entries on this page for "Bull Inna Penn" and "Chickama Chickama Craney Crow".

Click http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=110753 kids' game: I'm goin' down town to smoke my pipe for a number of examples & comments about this game.

Also click http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Spf1bvMQAsU&feature=related for a Reggae song called "What's The Time Mr. Wolf" by the New Zealand band Southside of Bombay.called "What Time Is It Mr, Wolf".

****
WHAT'S YOUR NAME
What's your name?
Puddin tain
Ask me again
and I'll tell you the same.
[This entire chant was usually repeated multiple times].
-Various sources including my memory of my childhood in Atlantic City, New Jersey in the 1950s

Note: One early source of this chant is The Real Issue: A Book of Kansas Stories (1896) by William Allen White. The quote from that book was from the short story "The King of Boyville"

The quote is:
"When a new boy, who didn't belong to the school, came up at recess to play, Piggy shuffled over to him and asked him gruffly: "What's your name?" "Puddin' 'n' tame, ast me agin an' I'll tell you the same," said the new boy, and then there was a fight."

as given in http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/555244 phrase origin "puddintain ask me again I'll telll you the same

****
WHO STOLE THE COOKIE FROM THE COOKIE JAR? (Example #1)
What about rhythm games? We played "Rhythm Ready" (and I can't quite remember how it goes, and (clap, snap, clap, snap)
All: Who stole the cookies from the cookie jar?
A:Number -- stole the cookies from the cookie jar.
B:Who me?
All:Yes you.
B:Couldn't be.
All:Then who?
B: Number -- stole the cookies from the cookie jar.

Missing would of course eliminate you from the circle.
-Barbara; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=81350&messages=221 ; "I'm Rubber . You're Glue: Children's Rhymes"; 5/27/2005

****
WHO STOLE THE COOKIE FROM THE COOKIE JAR? (Example #2)
who stole the cookie from the cookie jar?
number 1 stole the cookie from the cookie jar.
who sir me sir?
yes sir you sir.
no sir not i sir.
then sir who sir?

****
WHO STOLE THE COOKIE FROM THE COOKIE JAR? (Example #3)
I remember playing "Who stole the cookie from the cookie jar" a long long ago when I was growing up in Atlantic City, New Jersey, 1950s.

It was the only handclapping game that I remember playing with kids sitting down and clapping their own hands to the rhythm while they chanted the words.

The way we played it was that everybody was given a number before the game began and then numbers were called out consecutively starting with #1 and going through however many numbers of children were in the group.

Boring.

Another way to play this game is to for every player to be given a number before the game is started and then for the person who is “it” to randomly call out a number. Here's how I've seen this played in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in the rare occassion when I've seen it played (for what it's worth, this doesn't seem to me to be a game that African American children play without some adult in a school or summer camp initiating it). Btw, the response that I remember using during my childhood is the same response that I've heard in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania:

All: Who stole the cookie from the cookie jar
A designed person takes the first lead and says:

#5 stole the cookie from the cookie jar

#5 says: "Who me? Couldn't be”.

Everyone else says: Then who stole the cookie from the cookie jar?

#5: (calls out a randomly selected number) #9 stole the cookie from the
cookie jar.

This would continue until people got tired of playing this games.
-Azizi Powell ; 2/19/2009

****
WILLOWBEE
This way you willowbee,
O willowbee, O willowbee,
This way you willowbee,
All night long.

O dancin' down the alley, alley, alley,
Dancin' down the alley,
All night long.

O singin' down the alley, alley, alley,
Singin'' down the alley,
All night long.

O skippin' down the alley, alley, alley,
Skippin' down the alley,
All night long.

O singin' down the alley, alley, alley,
Singin'' down the alley,
All night long.

Directions:
Before dance begins, the children choose partners and attange themselves in parallel lines facing their partners. They join hands, ie.each partner with his mate, in "criss cross" fashion.

1. Throughout the singing of section A, they move their hands back and forth in see-saw fashion, but they do not move their feet

2. Unclap hands

3. Both parallel lines take a right turn and move simultaneously with a skip, hop step.

4. Both lines reverse and face opposite directions and dance back to original positions.

5. Repeat (3) only skip

6. Same as (4)
-Altona Trent Johns, Playsongs of the Deep South (Washington, D.C, The Associated Press Publishers. Inc., 1944, pps 16-17; given as version #2 of Willowbee)

Editor: The words of this game song and the movements are very similar to "Here we go Zoodio" (Zudio). See that game song below.

Also, see the link to the YouTube video in my comments about "Pizza Pizza Daddy-O" (Version #3) for an example of girls performing singing games in two parallel line formation and see the YouTube videos of "Zoodio" in that entry.

****
WIND A WIND-A THREAD
I am a 25 year old male, when I was in pre-school there was this game we used to play...... we all formed a circle and walked around saying something (I don't remember the words, so I will just write what I remember the words to be) "Wind-a, wind-a thread oh, wind-a, wind-a thread oh... (repeat once more) heel, toe, tap, tap, tap heel, toe, tap, tap, tap (while you are doing this, you walk around in the circle, circling your hands together. The whole thing is repeated, but the second time, instead of 'heel, toe.." you say "pull, pull, clap, clap, clap") if ANYONE knows of this game, PLEASE let me know. THANK YOU in advance
-Tavon; 11/17/2008

****
XYZ
YOU REMIND ME OF A MAN
You remind me of the man
What man?
The man with the power
What power
The power of hoodoo
Who do?
You do
Do what?
Remind me of the man

(remembered from some old B&W film - Marx brothers?)
-Snuffy; Folklore: http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82053&messages=25 Where's your money? In my pocket ; December 23, 2005

Note: On that same day, another poster ,BuckMulligan, corrected the commenter's recollection of what movie this dialogue was in:
"Snuffy, "the man with the power" occurs (don't know about "originates") in "The Bachelor and the Bobbysoxer" with Cary Grant, Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple, 1947. Lightweight flick but amusing. "
-snip-

I'm including it on this page because, like many chants and rhymes, it was chanted by children although children probably weren't the first to compose it. I remember "You Remind Me Of A Man" from my childhood in Atlantic City, New Jersey in the 1950s. The words were just chanted without handclapping or any other accompanying movements.

****
ZODIAC (HERE WE GO ZUDIO)
Editor: Examples of "Here We Go Zudio (Zodiac, Zoodio)" are presented here regardless of their first line or the spelling of the word "Zoodio"

ZODIAC (Version #1)
Here we go Zodiac, Zodiac, Zodiac
Here we go Zoodio all night long!
Oh, step back Sally Sally, Sally
Step back Sally all night long!
Oh a-walkin down the alley, alley, alley.
A-walkln down the alley all night long!
Oh, what did I see?
A big fat man from Tennesse!
I bet you five dollars I can beat that man!
To the front, to the back, to the si'-si' si'
To the front, to the back, to the si'-si'-si'

I called the doctor, and the doctor said
I got a pain in my si', oooo-chi-ah!
I got a pain in my si', oooo-chi-ah!
I got a pain in my si'.
- Washington D. C., schoolgirls, recorded 1976 at the Smithsonian Institution Festival Of American Folklore,Washington, D.C., [Band 2, "Ring Games and Jump Rope" of Old Mother Hippletoe: Rural and Urban Children's Songs ; New World Records. 1978; Record Notes Kate Rinzler ]

Record note: Zodiac" is generally played in two lines. It ends with the children "walking down th alley" by ones or in couples betweeen the lines.

Editor: In a number of versions that I have read the line "I looked over yonder" is usually given before the line "And what did I see?"

****
HERE WE GO ZOODIO (Version #2 of Zudio)
Here we go Zoodio, Zoodio, Zoodio
Here we go Zoodio all night long
Oh, step back Sally Sally, Sally
Step back Sally all night long.

Walkin down the alley, alley, alley
Walkln down the alley all night long.

[repeat from the beginning]

Editor:
I remember learning this song in the 1950s from a vacation Bible school teacher who was from Georgia. I've phonetically spelled that word "Zoodio", but I've seen it written "Zudio", or "Zodiac". If I recall correctly, we played this game by choosing partners who stood facing each other in two parallel lines. During the first part of the song the partners stood facing each other, held both of their partners' hands and to the beat moved their arms in criss-crossed fashion in what I call a see-saw, back & forth motion. Our knees were slightly bent when we did this motion.

On the words "step back sally" we jumped back to the beat. On the words "walkin through the alley" we continued singing but strutted across the large room and at the end of the song we were arbitrarily standing in front of a new partner. And then song would start again from the beginning.

That's just one way to play this rhyme. Actually, I bellieved instead of doing that last part, the partners would "walk down the alley" formed by the two parallel lines. An example of that way of playing this game can be found in the Zodiac example, and the first Zoodio video posted below my comments.

In 1998-2005 I taught this game song to (mostly African American) girls and boys in some Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania neighborhoods and in other African American communities near Pittsburgh. These children participated in after-school and summer game song groups that I conceptualized and facilitated (See About Us for more about Alafia Children Ensemble). These children didn't know this song prior to my teaching it to them.

When I taught children the zoodio game, the "partners" (girl & boy; two girls, or two boys) stood scattered across a wide space such as the floor of a gym or outdoor playground.. On the lines "walking down the alley", the partners were supposed to strut to a new partner. Unfortunately, none of these children were familiar with the word "strut", so I had to show them :o)

Here's how I taught children in my game song groups how to play Zudio (or "Zoodio" as I used to spell it)
1. children chose one partner
2. the two partners stand facing each other
3. the two partners crossed their hands and held their partner's hand
4. while singing the first lines "here we go zudio zudio zudio here we go zudio all night long", the partners swing their crossed hands back and forth to the beat, and while standing still, also move their slightly bent knees up & down to the same beat
5. on the words, "Step back sally", the partners jump back and forth away from, and then toward their partner
6. on the words, "walking through the alley", the partners strut to another partner
7. the song begins again and continues in this pattern

This movement song is good exercise and fun to do for children, teens, and adults!
-Azizi, 10/4/2006; Children's Singing Games http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31226&messages=23

Here's a YouTube video of this game in which people stand in parallel lines and two people dance down the aisle created by those lines. This is the same kind of dance form that was popularized by the American television show "Soul Train":

Zoodio

JustTheFam
August 02, 2009

-snip-

For more comments about what I think is the probable connection of this formation with that of the Soul Train line, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2012/02/roots-of-soul-train-line-formati... "The Roots Of The Soul Train Line Formation" .

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Here's a YouTube video of a little girl singing a portion of this game song:

Zoodio

Posted by mdathena
October 18, 2007

"Deanna learned a song from school"

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HERE COMES ZODIAC (Version #3 of "Zudio")
ok the zodiac thing I did at camp but it had more words.

Here comes zodiac zodiac zodiac
here comes zodiac all night long
here comes sally walking down the alley
here comes sally all night long
here comes another one
just like the other one
here comes another one all night long.
I looked out yonder and what do I see?
A big fat man from tennesse.
I bet ya five dollars that ya can't do this,
I bet ya five dollars that ya can't do that.
to the front to the back to the side side side.
to the front to the back to the side side side.
You lean wayyyyyy back,
you got a hump on your back,
you lean way back
you got a hump on your back.
Do the camel walk.

and I think it repeated.

We did it as a square dance. I'm not sure if the first part is quite right but the rest should be. Has anyone heard of this?
-Guest; 2/28.2006; Children's Singing Games http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31226&messages=23
-snip-
Another name for "Zudio" is "Here Comes Sally". Here's a video of two members of a family teaching this game to other family members:

Here Comes Sally - Key Family

.

sillylily220, Uploaded on Aug 29, 2010
-snip-
The only minor difference in the words is that the first time they sing the song, the woman and the girl sing
This way my zudio
This way my zudio
This way my zudio
All night long.

Step back Sally
Make a little alley.
Step back Sally
All night long...

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HERE WE GO ZUDIO (Version #4)
Here we go Zudio Zudio, Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long.
Here we go Zudio Zudio, Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long.

Step back Sally Sally, Sally
Step back Sally all night long.

Walkin' thru the alley, what do I see?
I see a great big man from Tennessee.
I betcha five dollars that you can't do this:
To the front, to the back
To the side side side.
To the front, to the back
To the side side side.

My mama called the doctor and the doctor said
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my side"
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my toe"
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my tummy"
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my head."

Here we go Zudio Zudio, Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long.
Here we go Zudio Zudio, Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long.

Step back Sally Sally, Sally
Step back Sally all night long.

Walkin' thru the alley, what do I see?
I see a great big man from Tennessee.
I betcha five dollars that you can't do this:
To the front, to the back
To the side side side.
To the front, to the back
To the side side side.

My mama called the doctor and the doctor said
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my chin"
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my knee"
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my neck"
"Ooh aah, I got a pain in my belly button."

Here we go Zudio Zudio, Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long.
Here we go Zudio Zudio, Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long.
All night long, all night long.
- http://www.peterandellen.com/lyrics/zudio.htm [Retrieved April 29, 2008]

Editor:
The words that I recall were the very much like those posted above, but we sang "Step back, Sally Sally Sally" and "Walkin' down the alley alley". I don't think we sang the next part, though that "Big man tryin' to hypnotize me" is awfully familiar to me for some reason or the other. When I read that line, what popped into my head was the line "A big Black man tryin to hynotize me". Or "a big Black man from Tennessee". By the way, I'm African American, if that matters :o} I'm not sure if I've heard those versions, but I'm betting that I didn't just make that up.

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HERE WE GO STUDIO (Version #5 of "Here We Go Zudio)
Here we go studio, studio, studio.
Here we go studio all night long.
Step back sally, sally, sally,
Step back Sally all night long.
Walking down the alley, what do i see?
I see a great big man from Tennessee.
Betcha five dollars i could catch that man
Betcha five dollars i could catch that man.
To the side to the side to the side side side
To the side to the side to the side side side
Side side side.
- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAcc1llWIWQ&feature=related

Editor:
Here's the summary comments to this video:

Posted by ur2good4me
December 30, 2006

"zudio, studio..? i dunno. it was a song we learned in like second grade, and my sister and i really liked it."

end of quote

Editor: Although the person writing the summary used the word "studio" in the lyrics, it sounds to me as if the little girl is singing "zoodio", which would conform with the usual word for this rhyme.

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HERE WE GO zUDIO (Version #6 of "Here We Go Zudio)
This is what I remember from the "Zudio" song:

Here we go Zudio, Zudio Zudio
Here we go Zudio all night long
And we step back Sally, Sally, Sally
Step back Sally all night long
And I'm walking down the alley, alley, alley
Walking down the alley all night long
And I look down yonder and what do I see?
A big fat man from Tennesee
I bet you $5 I can bust that man
Do the front, do the back, do the side, side, side
" " " " " "
I wear my dresses up above my knees
Turn around, touch the ground
I lean way back, get a hunch on my back
I do the camel walk, do the camel walk
-Guest, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=31226&messages=28 Children's singing games, June 30, 2012

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