AMERICAN BANJO & FIDDLE SONGS

AMERICAN BANJO & FIDDLE SONGS

This page contains examples of and commentary about selected 19th century or early 20th century American dance & play party fiddle and banjo songs.

These songs are presented for folkloric, historical, educational, and entertainment purposes.

Ms. Azizi Powell, Founder/Editor
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Latest revision - March 13, 2014

Information About The Songs On This Page
Most of these songs are considered part of either "Old Time" or "Bluegrass music". Among African Americans, in particular, some of these songs - along with early Blues, early ragtime, early jazz, prison & chain gang work songs - are also called "root music" or "downhome music."

Several examples of songs featured on this page are classified as "work songs" (songs that accompanied and set the rhythm for strenuous physical labor). "Shantys (chanteys), meaning songs chanted by sailors and/or dock workmen (stevadores), are also included in the category of "work songs".

Examples included on this page may also be considered as "play party songs". "Play party songs" such as "Skip To My Lou" , "Pop Goes the Weasel", and "Old Dan Tucker" are now generally considered to be game songs for young children. However, from the 1830s to 1950s, in certain areas of the United States, these types of movement songs took the place of prohibited dance songs. It was usually considered to be acceptable for adults, teens, and children to clap their hands, join hands with others, move to the beat, while they followed the instructions that were often included in the lyrics of these songs.

Also, a few examples on this page may have been considered to be religious songs. For example, the entry for the song "On Mary Don't You Weep" on this page includes a video of a Georgia fieldhands playing the banjo & singing and other young men singing that a religious/secular version of that song.

Sources Of The Tunes & Words Of These Songs
Some banjo & fiddle tunes & verses have been traced to various European folk songs/ tunes while other old time tunes & verses have been traced to 19th century (or earlier) African American dance songs or African American children's play songs. Here's a quote about blackface minstrel songs, a precusor of a considerable portion of old time music:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackface

"Author [John] Strausbaugh summed up as follows: "Some minstrel songs started as Negro folk songs, were adapted by White minstrels, became widely popular, and were readopted by Black'...The question of whether minstrelsy was white or black music was moot. It was a mix, a mutt – that is, it was American music.'
John, Strausbaugh Black Like You: Blackface, Whiteface, Insult & Imitation in American Popular Culture

Multiple Versions Of Folk Song
With regard to multiple versions of the songs that are featured on this page- folklorists attempt to locate the earliest known version of a particular folk song. Once the earliest documented version has been identified, that does not mean that later versions are "wrong" because they differ from the earliest known version in their words, in the order of verses; and/or the chorus (refrain) that is sung. That said, there are some verses that are considered to be "traditional". By "traditional" I mean verses that have been documented to have been used in early versions of these songs, and which appear to be most commonly found in these songs. have older songs. This Cocojams.com page gives preference to "traditional" verses over newly coined verses, particularly when the commenter citing those traditional verses includes a verifiable year of recording or publication of those lyrics in a newspaper, or book.

The Connection Of Certain Verses Of Banjo/Fiddle Songs To Children's Playground Rhymes
My interest in these songs grew out of my study of English language children's playground rhymes. As a result of my informal research, I have become aware of a large number of "floating" verses that are found in hand clap rhymes and other children's rhymes that have their source in 19th century or earlier social songs, particularly African American dance & play songs, and American minstrel songs (which lifted many of their verses from African American plantation social songs). While I'm fascinated with this topic, this page is not intended to present evidence of any connections between certain verses in playground rhymes and certain verses of 19th century dance and play songs.

l encourage visitors interested in that subject to visit Cocojams' Hand clap rhymes page http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymesis read to compare the songs and rhymes on those pages with some of the lyrics on this page.

Internet Sources of Examples
I found most of the lyrics for examples of songs on this page from Mudcat Discussion Forum. http://www.mudcat.org/threads.cfm
Other song lyrics and/or comments are from http://www.youtube.com/ viewer comments threads, from other Internet sites, and from books that are usually not readily assessible. When avaiiable, citations and hyperlinks are included for each entry.

I sincerely thank all the posters, and editors whose examples and/or comments about these songs are reposted on this site. If a commenter or site editor sends a request to cocojams17@yahoo.com that his or her comment be removed from this page, I will do so.

Note: A good online resource for lyrics and information on Bluegrass songs is http://www.bluegrassmessengers.com/home.aspx

Comment About The Use Of "The N Word" And Certain Dialectic Words & Phrases
As founder/editor of Cocojams.com I have decided that the "n word" will only be included on this website with asterisks or dashes or with the euphemistic term "the n word". For folkloric purposes, I have retained the (so-called) African American dialectic phrasing found in some of these examples. I have also retained the spelling of the word "Negro" with a small "n" as is written in some of the notes from the late 19th or early 20th century. However, as an African American, I strongly suggest that if these songs are sung or recited, that the dialect phrasing be substituted for contemporary phrasing.

Furthermore, I feel the need to share that writing the retired referent "Negro" with a small "n" is usually considered to be offensive by many African American people.

Internet Source of Videos

All videos embedded on Cocojams .com are from http://www.youtube.com/ . Videos are posted on this site for educational, entertainment, aesthetic, historical, and folkloric purposes. All rights to these videos remain with their respectful owners.

I sincerely thank all the video uploaders whose videos I have reposted on Cocojams.com. I also sincerely thank YouTube.com for helping to make these videos available to the general public.

If an uploader of a video sends a request to cocojams17@yahoo.com for me to remove his or her video from Cocojams.com, I will do so. Please note that links to YouTube videos or to other online resources may not remain viable. Please also be aware that comments posted on YouTube viewer comments threads may not be suitable for children.

A Personal Comment
It's ironic that I've started a page on banjo music on this website, because I used to detest banjo music because of its association in my mind with slavery and White 'blackfaced' minstrels. And I still vehemently dislike the negative racial stereotypes, "darky" references, and dialectic language found in many of American banjo songs. If I post any such songs on this page, I'll do so for the historical "record" and as a possible springboard to discussion.

But I've learned to be more accepting of American banjo & fiddle music & actually like some old time songs - especially as it is performed by African American groups such as The Carolina Chocolate Drops, Sankofa Strings, and the Ebony Hillbilliies. I'm very supportive of those groups' efforts to raise the awareness of African Americans and other people to this music, and I consider this page part of that effort.

Perhaps because we African Americans are more self-confident about our racial identity we can now go back & embrace this music that we had such a large part in creating. As the Ghanaian adinkra proverb Sankofa says "It is never too late to go back and claim what we have left behind."

Part of "going back and claiming it" is being alert to erroneous assertions that the banjo originated in the United States. It appears that some banjoists and some banjo groups may want to distant the banjo from its African roots. However, nowadays most musicologists and historians acknowledge that the prototype for the banjo came from one or more African musical instruments.

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banjo

Banjos with fingerboards and turning pegs are known from the Caribbean as early as the 17th century. 18th and 19th century writers transcribed the names of these instruments variously as "bangie", "banzar", "banjer", and "banjar". Instruments similar to the banjo (e.g. the Japanese shamsen, the Persian tar, and Morroccan sintir have been played for many centuries. Another likely ancestor of the banjo is the akonting, a spike folk lute played by the Jola tribe of Senegambia, and the ubaw-akwala of the Igbos. Similar instruments include the xalam of Senegal and the ngoni of the Wassoulou region including parts of Mali, Guinea, and the Ivory Coast as well as a larger variation of the ngoni developed in Morrocco by sub-Saharan Africans known as the gimbri.

I've no problem whatsoever with musicians of any race or ethnicity playing the banjo. But I do believe in giving credit where credit is due. The banjo is NOT a "native American instrument" (as promotional literature for a US banjo club reads). The prototype for the banjo in the Caribbean, the United States, and other American nations, came from enslaved Africans' memories of that instrument. Yes, the banjo has changed since then. But the banjo's history in the Caribbean and the Americas is intricately tied to the history of Black folks.

Related Cocojams.com pages

http://www.cocojams.com/content/african-american-secular-slave-songs

http://www.cocojams.com/content/sea-shanties-chanteys-neglected-area-bla...

Also, click to visit these pages on my Pancocojams blog: http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/09/banjo-is-not-native-american-mus... The Banjo is NOT a Native American Musical Instrument

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http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/10/shared-steroptypes-for-hillbilli...

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Contact Information
I very much welcome visitors' comments, additions, and corrections of the points that I've made on this page and on this entire website.

Please send examples of American Banjo & Fiddle songs along with information about the source of your example to: cocojams17@yahoo.com

Your email address is never posted or shared. Or, if you are on Facebook, visit me at cocojams jambalayah, and befriend me, or send me a private message. Thanks!

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EXAMPLES OF OLD AMERICAN BANJO & FIDDLE SONGS
(Note that examples I retrieved from online comments are presented in chronological order with the earliest dated comment given first)

A, B, C,
AIN'T I GOIN'
Interesting variant, [of "Cindy"]' "Brought from Arkansas to Western Nebraska, 1882."
1.
Ol' Missis gimmie ham of meat,
Ol' Massa gimmie two;
Ol' Missis gimmie ham of meat
To tote to the barbecue.

Chorus 1-
And ain't I goin', a goin', agoin'!
Ain't I goin'. goin', goin'!
Ain't I goin', goin', goin'!
Down de ol' plank road.

2
Lizy Jane am a fine ol' gal,
Eyes as black as jet;
I always tried to marry her,
Never come it yet.

Chorus 2-
So get along home, Si and a Cindy!
Get along home, Si and a Cindy!
Get along home, Si and a Cindy!
Take your time and go.

3
If I was gwine to trabbel,
I'd trabbel dis worl' roun';
Ans if I was to marry,
I'd marry Manthy Brown.

So get along home, etc.

4
O, you can ride the old gray hoss,
And I will ride the roan,
You can play with your sweetheart,
But let my gal alone.

O, ain't I goin', etc.

5
O, if I had a scolding wife,
As sure as you are born,
I'd take her down to New Orleans,
And trade her off for corn.

So get along home, etc.

"The tune is reminiscent of "Lucy Long," a negro-minstrel piece popular fifty years ago. I insert one of its stanzas and the chorus for comparison with stanza 5 as given above.
[From the "Rosebud Songster"]

O, if I had a scolding wife,
I'd whip her sure's you're born,
I'd take her down to New Orleans
And trade her off for corn.

So take your time, Miss Lucy
Take your time, Miss Lucy Long;
Take your time, Miss Lucy,
O Lucy, Lucy Long!

"From the dialect, negro origin may be inferred from Stanza 1 and 3. Its persistence may be due to the idiosyncracies of the singer,- a white boy who had lived in Tennessee, Arkansas and Missouri."

Jour. American Folklore, 1915, vol. 28, no. 108, pp. 171-172 (of 262-289).

Edwin F. Piper, Some Play-Party Games of the Middle West
-Q; Lyr. Add: Ain't I Goin' (Cindy variant) ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=91633 ; October 28, 2010

Editor:
In that same discussion thread on that same date, Q also posted this comment:
"These songs, esp. as play party or dance songs, have a fairly constant chorus, and add verses that fit from any source.
If the beat is similar, it is difficult to separate them. "Pay your money down" etc.

Bascom Lamar Lunsford (lyrics posted far above) characterized it as a jig. Small variations in tempo are common.

Many convergences; the origin in old minstrel dance songs, cf. Massa Had a Yellow Gal."
-snip-

Somewhat off topic, I'd like to share that the Canadian poster Q was the person who first informed me about Mudcat Discussion Forum in 2001 as a result of our brief email exchange. That email exchange was initiated by a question that Q asked me about a comment that I had written iabout the song "Jim Along Josey" in Cocojams' African American Secular Slave Songs page http://www.cocojams.com/content/african-american-secular-slave-songs. In mid 2004 I became a poster on Mudcat and regularly posted on that online discussion forum until December 2009. I sincerely thank Q for alerting meto that site. I also thank him and several other Mudcatters for teaching me and others through their role modeling about the importance of crediting sources when presenting song examples.

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BOIL THEM CABBAGE DOWN
Editor: Examples of this song may also be given under its dilectic name "Bile Dem Cabbage Down"

BILE DEM CABBAGE DOWN
Went up on the mountain
Just to give my horn a blow
Thought I heard my true love say
Yonder comes my beau

Bile dem cabbage down
Turn dem hoecakes round
The only song that I can sing
Is bile dem cabbage down

Took my gal to the blacksmith shop
To have her mouth made small
She turned around a time or two
And swallowed shop and all

Possum in a 'simmon tree
Raccoon on the ground
Raccoon says you son-of-a-gun
Shake some 'simmons down

Someone stole my old 'coon dog
Wish they'd bring him back
He chased the big hogs through the fence
And the little ones through the crack

Met a possum in the road
Blind as he could be
Jumped the fence and whipped my dog
And bristled up at me

Once I had an old gray mule
His name was Simon Slick
He'd roll his eyes and back his ears
And how that mule would kick

How that mule would kick
He kicked with his dying breath
He shoved his hind feet down his throat
And kicked himself to death

Raccoon has a bushy tail,
Possum's tail is bare,
Rabbit's got no tail at all
But a little bunch of hair.

Raccoon and the possum
Rackin' cross the prairie,
Raccoon ax the possum
Did she want to marry?

Possum is a cunning thing,
He travels in the dark,
And never thinks to curl his tail
Till he hears old Rover bark.

Possum up a 'simmon tree
Raccoon on the ground
Raccoon says to the possum,
Won't you shake them 'simmons down?

Jaybird died with the whoopin' cough,
Sparrow died with the colic.
Along come the frog with a fiddle on his back,
Inquirin' his way to the frolic.

From Lomax;_Folk Songs of North America, adapted from the singing of
Peggy Seeger.

Note that many of these verses are also often "floated" into and out of
other songs such as Cindy or Old Joe Clark.
- http://www.mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=625

**
Here's a video of this song:

Andy Griffith - Boil Them Cabbage Down

MikeB43 | August 17, 2006
The Darlings along with others sing. Taken from the Divorce, Mountain Style episode.

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BROTHER EPHUS (GOT THE COON AND GONE)
...The song ("Brother Ephus" in the DT, cobbled or put-together by Hedy West, is derived from several minstrel and Negro folk songs and spirituals. The first verse has been reported since 1909 (Mississippi), but parts are much older. Newman L. White, 1928, American Negro Folk Songs, p. cites fragments under the title:

BROTHER EBEN'S GOT A COON
Uncle Eph'm got the coon and gone on, gone on, gone on.
Uncle Eph'm got de coon and gone on,
And left me watching up de tree.
White says this verse was used as a refrain after a stanza that had antecedents in several old minstrel books.
This same song was reported by Scarborough, 1925, from Virginia (Brother Ephram).

BROTHER EBEN'S GOT A COON

Brother Eban's got a coon,
And gone on, gone on,
Brother Eban's got a coon,
And gone on, gone on.
Also reported by White, Durham, NC, 1919 from Ms.
White comments that "While hunting coon is almost unknown in the Negro folk songs of today, it was a commonplace in the old minstrel song books of the 1840s and 1850s," p. 223, 1965, reprinted by facsimile from the edition of 1928.
As already pointed out, the verse about stealing watermelon appears commonly:

Some folks say dat er preacher won't steal,
But I caught one in my cornfield.
He had er bushel, his wife had er peck,
De baby had a roastin' ear hung er round his neck.

Reported from Alabama, 1915-1918, "sung by cornfield Negroes." From White, (see above), p. 372.

An older one:
Some folks say dat n****rs won't steal,
I kotch one in my cornfield.
I ax him 'bout de corn, he call me a liar,
I up wid a chunk and knock him in de fiar.

White says that the version possibly came from the tidewater region of VA or NC, where "chunk" means to throw. The verse above is from "Negro Singers' Own Book, 1846(?), p. 411, in 'Whar You Cum From', by J. B. Harper, the "Celebrated Delineator of Comic and Aethiopian characters." It is probable that this song is "responsible for many others, including numerous blues, beginning 'What Some Folks Say.'" Quoted from White, p. 270, reference given above.

The last three lines of another:
But I caught three in my cornfield.
I ran dem through a pine thicket,
Stove my head in a yellow jacket nest.

and:
I caught two in my tater fiel',
One had a shovel and the other had a hoe,
If that ain't stealin' I don't know.
(The first from NC, the second from AL).

"Where you goin', Moses," is related to:

Whar you goin', buzzard;
Whar you goin', crow?
Gwine down to de low groun'
To git mah grubbin' hoe.

According to White, this could be a verse from the old Jim Crow song used by Thomas D. Rice in the 1830s (named for an old slave, Jim Crow, met by Rice in Louisiana).
There are a number of verses that the one about the slippers is related to:

What kind of clothes do the angels wear, Ugh! Ugh!
What kind of clothes do the abgels wear, Ugh! Ugh!
Oh, my --- etc., an "upstart crow" from the Negro spiritual,
"What Kind of Shoes Are You Going to Wear," see Negro Spirituals, or the Songs of the Jubilee Singers, No. 47, ed. T. F. Seward, pre-1900.

Similar verses in "Negro Folk Rhymes," Thomas W. Talley, 1991, Univ. Tennessee Press.
- Dicho ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=48470 ; Background of Brother Ephus; June 11, 2002

Editor:
This song is also known as "Uncle Ef's Got the Coon". "Coon" here probably started out meaning "racoon", but since "coon" was also used as a colloquial referent for Black people, it might also have that meaning in this song. See the entries on this page for "Old Zip Coon".

I changed the formatting for that comment to separate the lyrics from the comments. Talley's collection was originally published in 1922.

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CAROLINA CHOCOLATE DROPS CD REVIEW: GENUINE NEGRO JIG

nonesuchrecords | January 07, 2010
The Carolina Chocolate Drops offer a preview of their Nonesuch debut album, Genuine Negro Jig, capturing live performances, interviews with all three band members—Dom Flemons, Rhiannon Giddens, and Justin Robinson—and a few words from the album's producer, Joe Henry.

Note: This album won a Grammy (2011) for Best Traditional Folk Album
Congratulations!

Here's a comment from this video' s viewer comment thread:
"...are we re-enactors or interpreters? ...." To me, the Chocolate Drops are reclaimers. We all grew up learning to sing and play these folk tunes and melodies in simple schoolkid fashion. We put them away and became dutiful consumers of pop music, which is mostly the same tunes and songs processed and packaged for mass sales appeal and shelf life. Chocolate Drops reclaim the real energy and joy of these tunes. I hope they get to south Florida some day.
-newhavendave (2010)

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CARRY THE NEWS TO MARY
This song suggests an origin in spirituals, crossed with a play party song, converted to a minstrel song? I'm confused. Any information would be appreciated.

Lyr. Add: CARRY THE NEWS TO MARY
by Words by Charley Howard, music by Walter Bray

Oh! Martha wept and Mary cried:
We're all surrounded:
The good old man has gone and died,
We're all surrounded.
Shake off your slumbers and arise,
We're all surrounded
The sun is shining in the skies,
We're all surrounded.

Chorus:
Then carry the news,
Carry the news to Mary!
Carry the news,
We're all surrounded.
[Dance.}

The good old man we'll see no more,
We're all surrounded:
He has gone to the happy shore,
We're all surrounded.
He's gone and left us darks alone,
We're all surrounded:
And Gabriel's trumpet called him home,
We're all surrounded.

Chorus

Adam and Eve climbed up a tree,
We're all surrounded:
Their lamb and master for to see,
We're all surrounded.
Eve stole an apple from the tree,
We're all surrounded.
And Adam was stung by a bumble Bee,
We're all surrounded.

Chorus

Who is the 'good old man in this song- Lincoln? "Carry the news to Mary" was an expression that originated from the story of Martha meeting Jesus on his way to Bethany, and turning back to carry the news to Mary. It seems to have been a popular saying around Civil War time, but I am not certain of its purport.

H. De Masran, New York City, song sheet, 19th c., before 1880. Sheet music was published by R. Wittig, Philadelphia, arranged by Eddie Fox, but I haven't found a copy.
The music also appears in Cole, 1940, One Thousand Fiddle Tunes, p. 26. Anyone have that?
- Q, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=79960 Lyr Add: Carry the News to Mary, April 5, 2005

Editor: The word "darks" in the song [line- He's gone and left us darks alone] refers to people of dark skin (Black people). That line and indeed the entire song strongly suggests that it was composed by African Americans.

Click the above link for more comments about "Carry The News To Mary" including the information that it was sung as a work song by dock stevadores.

Here's a video of an instrumental version of this song:

Carry The News To Mary.wmv

Uploaded by giggletoot on Oct 9, 2010

From Elias Howe fiddle collection c. 1880.

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CHARLOTTE TOWN IS BURNING DOWN
in my opinion this song looks like an old fairy tale ther're many versions and no one's sure which is the right one in my chorus class we're singing
charlotte town's burnin down
good bye goodbye
burnin down to the ground
goodbye liza jane

aint chamighty sorry
ait chamighty sorry
goodbye lizajane

black my boots and a make them shine
goodbye goodbye
black my boots and a make them shine
goodbye liza jane

there's a gal in Baltimore
goodbye goodbye
silver doorplate on her door
goodbye liza jane

ohhhh eliza
theat lil lizaa jane
oh elizaaaaaaaaaaa
goodbye liza jane
lizaaaaaa jaaaane
floatin down the river
on the o hi o
-Guest, A; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25438&messages=29 Lyr Req: Charlotte Town; February 22, 2010 [reformatted for this page]

Editor:
This song is probably an adaptation of the "Liza Jane" songs (see a number of examples below). These lyrics were written in an essay form with little or no punctuation. This is an increasingly common form of writing on the Internet for young people. The goal is to write what you want to say quick, fast, and in a hurry.

Other versions of "Charlotte Town Is Burning Down" and comments about the song can be found by clicking that above link.

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CINDY CINDY (Also Known As "Get Along Home Cindy, Example #1)
"Note on "Cindy" in "Fiddle Tunes of the Old Frontier: The Henry Reed Collection" (Library of Congress, American Memory):
"Cindy" is a hardy perennial in Southern folk music. It is popular both in the Appalachians and in the lowland South annd as both a fiddle and banjo tune, associated with an assortment of playful lyrics. It may have once had circulation in African-American tradition, though its current distribution seems to be mainly among white musicians. Henry Reed's version agrees with most old-time musicians in the upper South in beginning the second strain on the downbeat ('GET along home, Cindy, Cindy') rather than on the upbeat ('Get along HOME, Cindy, Cindy')." ...

Note in N. I. White, 1928, "American Negro Folk-Songs," Social Songs no. 14 (p. 161).
Reposted from Auburn, AL, 1915-1916, heard at Wolf Creek, Tenn., a "Banjo Song."
White says: "Without definite evidence. I am of the opinion that this is an old banjo song of the whites. *With stanza 2 cf. the "Eliza Jane" songs, no. 28, in this chapter."

Cindy went to meetin',
She shouted and she squeeled;
She got so much religion
She broke her stocking heel.

Chorus
Get along home, Cindy, Cindy
Get along home, Cindy, Cindy,
Fare you well.

I went up to the mountain
For to get a load of cane
To make a jug of 'lasses
Sweeter 'n Liza Jane

GET ALONG, LIZA JANE
Reported from Greensboro, NC, 1915-1916, as heard in eastern and central NC.

Ask Miss Liza to hab me,
Says "Law, ain't you a shame?"
Ask Miss Liza to hab me,
Says "Git along, Liza Jane."
----------------------------------------------------

Randolph ("Ozark Folk Songs") obtained the song in 1930 from Mansfield, MO, no. 564A, vol. 3. with music 2/4.

Lips a-like a cherry,
Cheeks a-like a rose,
Now I love my pretty little gal
God in heaven knows!

Cindy's got religion,
She had it once before,
But when she hears my old banjo
She's the first one on the floor!

She told me that she loved me,
She called me sugar plum,
She throwed her arms around my neck
Like a grapevine round a gum.

Finger ring, finger ring,
Shinin', Glitterin' gold,
How I love my pretty little gal
It never can be told!

I wish I had a needle an' thread,
As fine as I could sew,
I'd pin it to the tail of my coat
An' down the road I'd go.

Among the references given, Piper (JAFL 28, 1915) is the earliest cited.
-------------------------------------

Bascomb Lamar Lunsford, Buncombe Co., sang a version (no date given) that is included in Brown, North Carolina Folk-Lore, vol. 3 (2/4 music and 1st verse in vol. 5, no. 404). Probably similar to the version recorded by Lunsford for Brunswick, 1928:

Oh, where'd ye git yer licker,
Where'd ye git yer dram?
I got it of a n****r
Way down in Rockin'ham.

Oh, git along home, Cindy, Cindy,
Git along home, Cindy, Cindy,
Git along home, Cindy,
Cindy'll marry you some time.
-Q; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=91633 ; Origins: 'Cindy Cindy' - how old is it? ;
May 21, 2006

Editor:
Q also wrote other comments on that same thread (See Massa Had A Yella Gal" below). In one of those comments written on that same date, that blogger mentioned that "With the addition of the chorus, "Git along....," the minstrel descendant and Af.-Am. song "Massa Had a Yaller Gal" become 'Cindy, Cindy." The root of 'Massa had' seems to be "The Gal from The South," an old minstrel tune...

Many verses of this type, floating between African-American party songs and among the party songs of whites as well. N. I. White, 1928, American Negro Folk-Songs, Social Songs 3A-G, pp. 152ff."

**
Here is an excerpt from another comment on that same thread:
"The Traditional Ballad Index has quite a lengthy entry on this song. The earliest citation they could find is 1915, so the song is likely to be older than that."...
-Joe; May 20, 2006 [The entry on "Cindy" from The Traditional Ballad Index is posted in that thread.

Here is an instrumental version of "Get Along Home Cindy"

Curley Money-Get Along Home Cindy

bigmoney1950 | November 13, 2009 The only live video of Curley Money on the internet,That I know of.Curley Money playing the fiddle.

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CINDY (Also Known As "Get Along Home Cindy, Example #2)
From North Carolina, 1911, described as an "old Negro song":

I'll never marry an old maid,
Tell you de reason why:
Neck so long and stringy
'Fraid she'll never die.

Git along home, Cindy, Cindy,
Git along my Cindy gal,
Way down in Yallerbam.

I'll never marry a po' gal,
Tell you de reason why:
She'll eat up all yo' rations,
An' fool you on de sly.

Git along, etc.
-Guest,Lighter;
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=91633 ; Origins: 'Cindy Cindy' - how old is it? ;
October 27, 2010

Editor:
Unfortunately, no source was given for the note at the beginning of that post. However, see the information cited in Lighter's next comment which is reposted below.

****
CINDY (Also Known As "Get Along Home Cindy, Example #3)
Two tidbits:

Atlanta Constitution, Sept. 1, 1915, p. 6:

NORTH CA'LINY FOLK-SONG

O J Coffin is the author if this folk-song in The Charlotte Observer:

They haint a gal like Cindy
There'll never be but one
Th' Lawd when he had made er
Seed whut he'd went an done

O git along home Cindy Cindy
O git along home Cindy Cindy
O git along home Cindy Cindy
Down in Rockingham

Woodent merry Cindy
Tell you reason why
Necks so long an stringy
Feared shed never die

Cindy in th Summertime
Cindy in the Fall
Kaint git Cindy all th time
Wont have Cindy tall

And from the Raleigh (N.C.) News and Observer, Sept. 15, 1886:

"A Light-hearted Murderer

Wiley Gosnell, of Madison county, has been lodged in jail at Marshall,charged with the murder of his wife. It seems that one day last winter Gosnell and one Ephraim Shelton got into a row at Gosnell's house. Both drew pistols, simultaneously. Mrs. Gosnell rushed between the belligerents just before they fired at each other, and received a shot which killed her. Whose pistol fired the fatal shot is a matter of some doubt. Gosnell was captured in Haywood county. He came into Marshall on his way to jail between two guards, gaily picking a banjo to the tune of 'Git along home, Cindy Jane.'"
-Guest,Lighter;
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=91633 ; Origins: 'Cindy Cindy' - how old is it? ;
October 27, 2010

Editor: This information changes the earliest known date of "(Get Along Home) Cindy" from the 1915 date that was given in The Traditional Ballad Index to the 1886 date as noted in that newspaper.

Also, a floating verse that includes mention of "Cindy" is included in an example below of "Liza Jane".

**
Here's an interesting video of a performer playing "spoons" while singing "Get Along Home, Cindy"

1Digitalrick | June 27, 2010
Tex Tumblweed and Carol performing Get along home, Cindy Cindy: Get along home, Cindy Cindy: Get along home, Cindy Cindy from Saturday 06-26-2010

****
COLORED ARISTOCRACY

ccdrops | June 28, 2006
Sankofa Strings perform Colored Aristocracy in Saxapahaw, North Carolina.

****
CORNBREAD AND BUTTER BEANS (Version #1)
Chorus:
Cornbread and butter beans and you across the table,
Eating beans and making love as long as I am able,
Hoeing corn and cotton, too, and when the day is over,
Ride a mule, a crazy fool, and love again all over.

Goodbye. Don't you cry. I'm going to Lou'siana,
Buy a dog and a big fat hog and marry Suzy Anna.
Sing-song, ding-dong, gonna take a trip to China,
Cornbread and butter beans, and there to Carolina. CHORUS

Wearing shoes and drinking booze is going against the Bible.
A necktie will make you die and cause you lots of trouble.
Streetcars and whiskey bars and kissing pretty women,
Whoa, man, that's the end of a terrible beginning. CHORUS

Can't read and don't care and education's awful.
Raising heck and writing checks, that ought to be unlawful.
Silk hose and pretty clothes are just a waste of money.
I can see how glad you'll be to marry me, my honey. CHORUS

[As sung by the Carolina Sunshine Trio on the various-artists compilation "WPAQ: Voice of the Blue Ridge Mountains," Rounder CD #404, 1999.]

Lyrics copied from http://www.m-bettencourt.com/full/DOC/color.doc, [editor-that page no longer available] with a few corrections by me, based on the sound file found at http://www.angelfire.com/in4/jim640.
-Jim Dixon'; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=45192 ; Lyr/Chords Req: corn bread and butter beans ; August 19, 2005

Here's a video of The Wiyos - Cornbread and Butterbeans

North Carolina style old-time string band

****
CORNBREAD AND BUTTER BEANS (Version #2)
(Carolina Chocolate Drops)

Chorus:
Cornbread and butter beans and you across the table,
Eatin beans and makin love as long as I am able,
Hoein corn and cotton, too, and when the day is over,
Ride the mule, and cut the fool, and love again all over.

Goodbye. Don't you cry. I'm goin to Lou'siana,
Buy a coon dog and a big fat hog and marry Suzy Anna.
Sing-song, ding-dong, now take a trip to China,
Cornbread and butter beans, and back to North Carolina.

Chorus

Wearin shoes and drinkin booze it's goes against the Bible.
A necktie will make you die and cause you lots of trouble.
Streetcars and whiskey bars and kissin pretty women,
Women, yeah that's the end of a terrible beginnin.

Chorus

I can't read and don't care and education's awful.
Raisin heck and writin checks, that ought to be unlawful.
Silk hose and frilly clothes are just a waste of money.
Come with me and stay with me and say you'll be my honey.

Chorus (2x)
- Carolina Chocolate Drops; traditional? ; (transcription Azizi Powell, from video, 2/13/2011b)

Here's that video:

Carolina Chocolate Drops "Cornbread and Butterbeans"

knoxnews | May 12, 2008
Carolina Chocolate Drops performing "Cornbread and Butterbeans" at WDVX's Blue Plate Special.

*****
CRIPPLE CREEK (Example #1)
I've been wondering about the song Cripple Creek - specifically, would it have been played or sung in mid-19th century (that is, the 1850's - 1860's? Is it based on a tune from that era?...I'm talking about the regular old Cripple Creek - "I've got a gal at the head of the creek, goin' up to see her 'bout half past the week/Cripple Creek wide and Cripple Creek deep, goin' wade Cripple Creek 'fore I sleep..."

I'm more curious about the tune than any set of words - even if the words date to the Colorado gold rush, was the tune in use before that?
--Guest, Jon W; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82345 Origins: How old is the song 'Cripple Creek'? ; June 23, 2005

Editor:
Although the entire discussion thread is a response to this question, I'm reposting two specific responses for the information that they convey. Both responses were written on June 23, 2005.

..."My opinion is that the tune probably is earlier than the Cripple Creek gold strike, but that the words, and thus the song title, could have been put to it afterward, say at the turn of the century.

According to the late Gus Meade in his magnificent book "Country Music Sources," the first reference to the tune as "Cripple Creek" is in the Journal of Am. Folklore, 1915. That of course predates any known recording.

First recording issued was by a black one-man band, Stovepipe No. 1, August 20, 1924. The day before that, Fiddlin' Powers of Dungannon, VA recorded it.

But note this: Land Norris of Georgia recorded it in the mid-20s as "Red Creek." Milton Brown and his Brownies recorded it as "Goin' Up Brushy Fork."

My take on all this is that there was an old fiddle tune named "(your local waterway here) Creek" or "Fork" or whatever, and that the fun syllables and aliteration of Cripple Creek (and its wide publicity during the gold fever) attached that name to the old tune and gave it new impetus. Not long after that, folklorists were collecting the song, along with a few pickup verses referring to Cripple Creek, and that's how it became standard under its present name.

Wouldn't surprise me if a good few other old tunes may have acquired their present names and lyrics in much the same multistage way."
-Guest, Bob Coltman

**
"Throwing my hat into the ring, the two earliest recordings seem to be both by Virginians from the Galax area, Stoneman and the Hopkins Brothers (Hillbillies). Cripple Creek isn't that far west from Galax up in Wythe County. However according to a friend of mine from Cripple Creek Va. it was iron and not coal that was mined there. It's a quiet little back country community now.
Nothing to do with the origin or date of the tune to which it is sung but I would think that Ernest Stoneman is as good a bet as any for being the originator.
According to a collector and researcher friend of mine Shootin' Creek in Poole's time was where much of the local moonshine originated.
There is another Shooting Creek in the very south west of NC but that's miles away from Poole's Shootin'Creek."
-Guest,Hootenanny

****
CRIPPLE CREEK (Example #2 & #3)
Article in JAFL*...
Two fragments of "Cripple Creek" were collected by E. C. Perrow, and published in JAFL, 1915, vol. 28, , "Songs and Rhymes of the South," Part VIII, no. 42. No musical score.

42. CRIPPLE CREEK (1)
A
"(From East Tennessee; mountain whites; from memory; 1909)"

Goin' to Cripple Creek, goin' ter Rome [roam?]
Goin' ter Cripple Creek, goin' back home.

See them women layin' in the shade,
Waitin' fer the money them men have made.

Roll my breeches ter my knees
En wade ol' Cripple Creek when I please.

"(1) A well-known mining district in Virginia." (2)
(2) Probably Rome, Tennessee; also a Rome in Georgia.

B.
"(From South Carolina; country whites, MS. of Mr. Bryan; 1909)"

Goin' to Cripple Creek, going in a run;
Goin' to Cripple Creek to have my fun.

Nothing in early collections that would suggest connection to Cripple Creek, CO.
-Q; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=82345 Origins: How old is the song 'Cripple Creek'? ; November 7, 2008

* JAFL =Journal of American Folklore

Here's a sound file "video" of the tune "Cripple Creek"

Earl Scruggs And Lester Flatt - Cripple Creek

JohnnyCashFan11 | September 19, 2008

Here's two viewer comments from that video's viewer comment thread
Is this the song that says: http://www.youtube.com/comment_servlet?all_comments=1&v=B4sqishGuYw

Goin' up cripple creek, goin' on a run,
Goin' up cripple creek to have a little fun.
Goin' up cripple creek, goin' in a whirl,
Goin' up to cripple creek to see my girl.
?
-blogegog (2010)

**
@blogegog Yes it is
-TehLieutenant75 (2010)

CRIPPLE CREEK (Example #4)
Heeey, I got a girl at the head of the Creek.
And I go to see her 'bout two times a week.
Kiss her in the mouth sweet as any wine.
She wrap herself around me
Like a sweet potato vine.

Chorus:
I'm goin' up Cripple Creek, goin' on a run,
Goin' up Cripple Creek to have a little fun.
Goin' up cripple creek, goin' in a whirl,
Goin' up to cripple creek to see my girl.

Chorus

Now, the girls up Cripple Creek about half grown
Jump on a boy like a dog on a bone.
Roll my britches up to my knees
Wade up Cripple Creek whenever I please

Chorus

Now, Cripple Creeks' wide and Cripple Creeks' deep.
I'm wade ole Creeple Creek before I sleep.
Hills are steep and the roads are muddy.
I got so dizzy that I can't stand steady. *

Chorus
- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXkM11kp_tg SesameStreet | June 26, 2009
Buffy Sainte-Marie shares her mouth bow.

[transcription from the video by Azizi Powell, January 12, 2011]

*Click http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Cripple_Creek.htm for lyrics to that song. In that version, that line is given as "An I''m so drunk, I can't stan' steady".

Here's that video:

Sesame Street: Cripple Creek

D, E, F,
DON'T GET WEARY CHILDREN (MASSA HAD A YELLOW GAL)
Don't Get Weary Children (Massa Had a Yellow Gal)
Complete text(s)

*** A ***

Don't Get Weary Children

As recorded by Uncle Dave Macon, August 15, 1934. Transcribed, with some
difficulty and probable inaccuracies, by Robert B. Waltz.

Nashville's was a big hotel,
Chattanooga's was a loon, [??]
Knoxville's full of Republicans,
And Memphis loves the tune. [??]

Chorus
Don't get weary,
Don't get weary, children.
Don't get weary,
I'm coming from the ball.

Wish I had a sugar rum,
Sugar by the pound,
Great big hole to stir it in,
Pretty girl hand it 'round.

Big bee sucks the blossom,
Little bee makes the honey;
Poor man makes the cotton and corn,
Rich man makes the money.

Massa had a yellow gal,
He brought her from the south,
Hair's so curly on her head
She could not shut her mouth.

People on the corner,
Watching us go by,
Could not see us very long,
So far we could fly.

*** B ***

(No title)

Reprinted in Darling, The New American Songster, p. 355; originally
from p. 382 of White, Negro Folk Songs.

The old bee makes the honey-comb,
The young bee makes the honey;
Colored folks plant the cotton and corn,
And the white folks get the money.

*** C ***

Massa Had a Yaller Gal

From B. A. Botkin, A Treasury of American Folklore, pp. 903-904.
From p. 68 of Scarborough, On the Trail of Negro Folk-Songs

Massa had a yaller gal,
He brought her from de South;
Her hair it curled so very tight
She couldn't shut her mouth.

Chorus:
Oh, I ain't got time to tarry,
Oh, I ain't got time to tarry,
Oh, I ain't got time to tarry, boys,
For I'se gwine away.

He took her to de tailor,
To have her mouth made small.
She swallowed up the tailor,
Tailorshop and all.

Massa had no hooks nor nails
Nor anything like that;
So on this darky's nose he used
To hang his coat and hat.
- http://www.folklorist.org/song/Don't_Get_Weary_Children_(Massa_Had_a_Yellow_Gal), retrieved 1/8/2012

****
EBONY HILLBILLIES VIDEO (unnamed tune)
Editor: I posting this video here until I find out the name of the tune. If you know this tune's name, please post it via a message on this video's YouTube thread, or via my email cocojams17@yahoo.com or via a message to my Facebook page, cocojams jambalayah. Thanks!

Ebony Hillbillies
SymphonysSpace | December 11, 2007
Ebony Hillbillies play as a part of MTA Underground

Here are two comments from that video's viewer comment thread:
"Bluegrass is nothing more than Jazzed up (Bebop like) Old time/string band music. Go look up what Bill Monroe said his music was composed of! Black String bands/old time music has always existed (ask Dock Boggs) but the record companys didn't record much of it."
-BMZSOUL2 (2009)

**
I really do love this band's music. You can't beat a fiddle and a banjo and bass fiddle and the washboard. I like the sound of the washboard using either the fingers or the brush like this young gentlemen is using. They are all terrific. Thank you for posting. - Paula
-PaulinaRena (2009)

****
ELIZA JANE
See entries below for Little Liza Jane

G, H, I,
GEORGIE BUCK, Example #1
Figured it was time I added the [Bascom Lamar] Lunsford lyrics as I heard them. I should emphasize these may differ from others, as they came from a private recording.

Way it happened, I was visiting collector-singer Artus Moser in Swannanoa in 1955, and he played me a home cut disk he'd made of Lunsford singing the song. It was the first time I'd heard it and still the best ... Lunsford must be one of the earliest to record it, after Al Hopkins' band. You'll notice it's a little bit incoherent, but I swear these are the lyrics I heard off that record.

Other versions seem related to "Skillet Good and Greasy," "Lulie Let Your Bangs Roll Down," etc. but this one is related only to "Rabbit In the Log."

GEORGIE BUCK
As sung by Bascom Lamar Lunsford on a home cut disk, recording date unknown, made by or for Artus Moser 1955 or earlier.

Georgie Buck is dead,
And the last word he said,
Was never let a woman
Have her way.

Rabbit in the log,
And I ain't got no dog,
And 'twould never do to let it
Git out an' gone.

I'm standin' on the log,
With the shot preacher's dog,
And I never was so sorry
In my life.

Young rabbit on the level,
Killed out of the Devil,
Oh, how can I catch it,
Lord, Lord,

Georgie Buck is dead,
And the last word he said
Was never let a woman
Have her way.

Let a woman have her way,
She'll lay you in the grave,
Oh, never let a woman
Have her way.

Couple of traditional verses from other versions I usually add in with this are:

If you don't believe I'll fight,
Just follow me out tonight,
And I'll shoot you and I'll cut you,
God knows.

Georgie Buck he died,
And he laughed and he cried,
Rock me in the cradle,
Law, law.
-Guest Bob Coltman ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14334 Lyr Req: Georgia Buck; February 26, 2008

****
GEORGIA BUCK , Example #2 & #3 (with another song for comparison)
Two black versions of the song, from Folkways SF 40079, "Black Banjo Songsters of North Carolina and Virginia":

Joe and Odell Thompson (1974)

Georgie Buck is dead
Last word he said,
Don't want no shortnin' in my bread*

Caused me to weep
Caused me to mourn
Caused me to leave my home

Oh, it's oh me, oh my,
Trouble I do see

Georgie Buck is dead
Last word he said
Don't let a woman have her way

Lord, a woman have her way
Go and stay all day
Don't let a woman have her way

It rained and it popped
Old Black Annie got shot
Down by the barroom door**

repeat 3
repeat 1
repeat 2

*Odell's wife Susie Thompson knew this line as "Don't want no children in my bed."

**This verse is a crossover from "Black Annie"

Dink Roberts (1974)

Georgie
Georgie Buck is dead
Last word he said
Don't let a woman have her way
(spoken) What y'say, banjo?

Yes, if you let a woman have her way
(spoken) I ain't talkin' bout you, now
(sung) She'll lead you to astray
Said I'm goin' to the shack
Where the car Number Nine
(spoken) What say, banjo?

The CD notes, by Cecelia Conway, seem to imply that John Snipes also knew the song but the set doesn't include a rendition by him.

Elizabeth Cotten plays a version on her album "Freight Train," part of a medley of banjo songs. The vocals are not very well miked.

Georgie Buck is dead,
Last words he said
Don't want no shortnin' in my bread.

Shortnin' in my bread
Swimming (?) in my head
(last line not quite audible to me)

I've downloaded a couple of field recordings from the Digital Library of Appalachia. Black banjoist Rufus Kasey does a nice clawhammered instrumental version from 1984, and there are two 1979 takes by white fingerpicker J Roy Stalcup, with some discussion of the lyrics (he recites a couple of verses but doesn't sing them), as well as how the song crosses over with what he calls "500 Miles," i.e., "Old Reuben."

Compare the song "Since I Left My Father's Home," recorded from Clarence Tross of Hardy Co, WV, in 1960 and again in 1974. Both of these recordings are also in the DLA.

(1960 recording, a cap)
Oh me, oh my
I'm sorry I left my home
The day I left my father's house
That's the day I left my home.

Old John Brown is dead
Last words he said
Never let a woman have her way.
If a woman have her way
She'll lead a man astray
Never let a woman have her way.

It's rock, darling, rock,
Rock, darling, rock, Lord knows
Just 'hind the rock
Old Towser treed a fox,
And I'll hunt when I get ready[?], Lord knows.

Repeat one

I'm goin' down the street
Kiss the first girl I meet
And it's nobody's business but my own.
Well the greyhound's on my track
And the chicken's in my sack
And I'll [?] by the shanty, Lord knows.

The 1974 Tross recording, with vigorous banjo, is very poorly miked and the vocal is all but inaudible. Tross was born in 1884 and says he learned the song from his father, who was born abt 1850. I doubt that all the lyrics of the song are of that vintage, but it has some obvious similarities to "Georgie Buck," "Old Rattler," "Skillet Good and Greasy," and other banjo songs of black origin. The melody of the unaccompanied version sounds slightly more archaic to me than the one that he plays on banjo.
-12-stringer; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=14334 Lyr Req: Georgia Buck; February 27, 2008

**
Here's a short sound file of this song as sung by African American banjoist Dink Roberts

Dink Roberts - "Georgia Buck"

SmithsonianFolkways | April 06, 2009
For more information about this album, click here: http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetai...

**
Here's the Carolina Chocolate Drops playing & singing - "Georgia Buck"

nandomedia | January 28, 2007
Carolina Chocolate Drops perform outside the Wilson Library at UNC-Chapel Hill. Part of newsobserver.com Great Eight 2007 - 8 bands to watch in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area.

Here's a comment from this video's viewer comment thread:
I used to hate this kind of music growing up. But now I can really get into this it is great to I KNOW that some young black musicians are carrying on this rich legacy that few Blacks even acknowledge much less appreciate.
-tonirob1015; November 2010

****
Here's an instrumental example of the Georgia Buck:

Precious Bryant plays "Georgia Buck"

DownhomeTraces | July 03, 2009 | 16 likes, 0 dislikes
http://downhometraces.com/2009/07/04/...

Editor: In her introduction to this tune, Precious Bryant says "Anybody wanna buck dance, get out there and hit it. I don't care".

Some information about buck dancing is posted below.

****
GIT ALONG DOWN TO TOWN
The following song relates "Cindy" to "Massa Had a Yaller Gal," seemingly collected in 1876-1886 from northern South Carolina and reported in "Literary Digest," May 27, 1916. N. I. White, 1928, "American Negro Folk-Songs," p. 152ff., Social Songs No. 3.

"Git Along Down to Town" from Duncan Emrich, 1974, "American Folk Poetry, an Anthology," p. 65.

Lyr. Add: Git Along Down to Town
Henry King and Family, Visalia, CA, 1941

Boss he had a yaller gal,
He brought her from the South,
She had her hair done up so tight
Couldn't hardly shut her mouth.

Git along down to town
Git along down to town,
Git along down to Little Rock town,
Gonna set my banjo down.

Her head looked like a coffee pot,
Her nose looked like the spout,
Her mouth looked like the fireplace
With the ashes all raked out.

I wouldn't have a yaller gal
Now here's the reason why,
Her neck's so long and scrangy
She'd make them biscuits fly.

Boss he had an old gray mare,
He rode her down in town
Before he got his trading done,
The buzzards had her down.

Boss he had an old gray mare,
Her name was Brindly Brown,
Every tooth in that mare's head
Had sixteen inches 'round.

Well I hoped on that old gray mare,
I rode her through the town,
I sold that mare for fifteen cents
And I got my money down.

Git along down to town,
Git along down to town,
Git along down to Little Rock town,
Gonna push my 'bacco 'round.

Boss he had a big white house
Sixteen stories high,
Well every story in that house
Was lined with chicken pie
'Bacco chorus

Whiskey by the gallon
And sugar by the pound,
A great big bowl to pour it in
And a pretty girl to carry it around.

banjo chorus
- Source: Duncan Emrich, 1974, "American Folk Poetry, an Anthology," p. 65, posted in http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=91633&messages=30 Origins: 'Cindy Cindy' - how old is it?by Q, on May 21, 2006

J, K, L,
JINGLE AT THE WINDOW
See the entry for Tideo on this page

****
JULIANNE JOHNSON
(repeat entire verse 2x)

Julianne Johnson
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh,

I'm gonna leave you.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

Goodbye Julie.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

I'm gon marry Marthy.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

It's Marthy promise.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

Goodbye Julie.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

Julianne Johnson
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

Goodbye Julie
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

Julianne Johnson.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

I done got married.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

I married Marthy.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

I done got married.
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.

Marthy promised
Haagh. Oh Lord. Haagh.
-Leadbelly, From: Leadbelly: When the Sun Goes Down, Volume 5: Take This Hammer
Release date: January 1, 1900
[transcription by Azizi Powell, January 12, 2011 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6bL6AshupY&playnext=1&list=PL026123E5E73...

Editor:
"Marthy" is a no longer used nickname for "Martha".

Here's a note that I read on another sound file video of this song:
"The 'Haagh' refers to: This is a prison work-gang song. It was sung to help make the work of building railroads easier and go in a rhythm. The 'haagh' is everytime the sledge hammer comes down on a spike.
-Namdoog01 (2009) ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYoHWLittf8&feature=related

Here's that video:

RagtimeDorianHenry

**
Here's a video of an instrumental version of "Julianne Johnson"

The Bogghoppers (Julianne Johnson)

lewdite | March 03, 2009

The Bogghoppers are;
Dara Weiss (guitar)
Glenn Patterson (fiddle)
Tyler Rudolph (banjo)

"more good "pickin' & sawin'" from the February 20th performance at the Yellow Door"

****
LIZA JANE

Editor: There are a lot of 19th century and early 20th American dance & play party songs with the name "Little Liza Jane". "Goodbye Liza Jane" and other similar names. I'm adding examples of each song under this heading, regardless of the title that was given it. I strongly encourage Cocojams visitors to read the entire threads of all of the Mudcat links on these songs that I have excerpted, and other threads that are hyperlinked at the top of those thread pages.

LIL LIZA JANE (Examples #1 & #2)
Here's a few verses I have collected...

I've got a gal and you've got none, l'il Liza Jane
I've got a gal that calls me [hon], l'il Liza Jane.

CHORUS: Oh Eliza, l'il Liza Jane; Oh Eliza, l'il Liza Jane.

Liza Jane done come to me; l'll Liza Jane
We're as happy as we can be; l'il Liza Jane.

Come my love and live with me; l'il Liza Jane
I will take good care of thee; l'il Liza Jane.

Get a house and lot in Baltimore; l'il Liza Jane
Lots of children runnin' out the door; l'il Liza Jane.

More verses to: L'IL LIZA JANE

I know a gal that I adore, l'il Liza Jane.
'Way down south in Baltimore, l'il Liza Jane.

CHORUS: Oh, Eliza, l'il Liza Jane.; Oh, Eliza, l'il Liza Jane.

Down where she lives, the posies grow; l'il Liza Jane.
Chickens 'round the kitchen do' (door); l'il Liza Jane.

I wouldn't care how far we roam; l'il Liza Jane.
Where she's at is home sweet home; l'il Liza Jane..
-Gene; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2777 Goodbye Liza Jane; September 9, 2007

Editor: This post and others on that particular thread were in response to this late night September 8, 1997 request by Nathan Sarvis [email address deleted] "Looking for lyrics to this fiddle tune. I think there are probably floating verses, and I think this has "floated" into other tunes--I found "Shiloh" with the phrase "Goodbye Liza Jane" in the chorus, but assume that was borrowed from the fiddle tune. Any help is appreciated."

****
LITTLE LIZA JANE (Version #3)
Well, I got a girl in Baltimo.
Little Liza Jane.
She's so pretty. She lives next door.
Little Liza Jane

Raccoon in the 'simmons tree.
Little Liza Jane.
Throw that 'simmons down to me.
Little Liza Jane

Chorus: [sing entire chorus 2 times]
Oh, Little Liza.
Little Liza Jane.
Oh, Little Liza
Little Liza Jane.

Hey! [Instrumental]

'Fore my massa comes to me.
Little Liza Jane.
Set that girl down on my knee.
Little Liza Jane

Tunny (?) & Liza runnin down the track.*
Little Liza Jane
Twelve o'clock when they get back.
Little Liza Jane

Pick that cotton 'till quarter past three.
Little Liza Jane.
Liza bring my body 'round.
Little Liza Jane

Hit it! [Instrumental]

Chorus.

Everytime I'm feelin' down.
That's when Liza comes to me.
Little Liza Jane
-Guy Davis - "Little Liza Jane" ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4uABe-u6Mps ; November 09, 2009 ; track 8 of the album "Recapturing The Banjo"

Transcription by Azizi Powell, January 12, 2011.

* Thanks to Sule Greg C. Wilson for help transcribing the words to this line. Sule indicated that the first word was "Tunny". I wasn't sure what those first three words were, but I thought I heard "Lies" and should have known that word was "Liza". "Tunny" is probably a male nickname ,since that would fit with the "and Liza" line, And that would also fit with the next line which is very clear. But that name could also be "Junie" , a shortened form of "Junior". In my childhood in the 1950s (but in New Jersey and not the South), this was a fairly common nickname for Black boys (and non-Black boys?) who were named after their fathers. Perhaps that was a custom back when that verse was composed. Of course, "Tunny" in that line could be other names as well.

Editor:
Guy Davis is an African American banjoist. As the album name alludes, this is part of a movement for African Americans to reclaim the banjo (which originated in Africa) and the music to which 19th century and early 20th century African Americans heavily contributed.

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GOOD-BYE LIZA JANE (Example #4)
Good-Bye Liza Jane (according to sandbag/songburg) was a minstrel song, traveling the mid west circus route on the program for Rutledge & Rogers.
Our horse fell down the well around behind the stable (2x)
Well he didn't fall clear down but he fell, fell, fell, fell, fell, fell,
As far as he was able. Oh it's good-by Liza Jane

Our goose swallowed a snail, & his eyes stuck out with wonder (2x)
For the horns grew through his tail, tail, tail, tail, tail, tail,
And bust it all asunder. Oh it's good-by Liza Jane.

My gal crossed the bridge, so she wouldn't get her feet wet (2x)
Well she didn't cross the bridge, but she (would 6x)
But the bridge it wasn't built yet. Oh it's good-by Liza Jane.

There are a couple of other Liza Janes: Liza Jane, Liza In The Summertime (or She Died On The Train) both dealing with a chorus of dead Lizas, then there's Mountain Top, I've also heard it as a fast reel, but never heard it done as well as the one Gene has above done by the Manhaden Chanteymen.
-Barry; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2777 Goodbye Liza Jane; September 9, 1997

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MISS LIZA, POOR GAL (Example #5)
The whole Liza Jane family of songs could probably make a good thesis. Here is another great old Liza song~~Miss Liza, Poor Gal as done by the Tenneva Ramblers on August 4, 1927. If the date sounds familiar, it is because that was the date of the famous Bristol sessions. The Tenneva Ramblers and Jimmie Rodgers were preparing to record, but they had a disagreement over whether to call the group the Tenneva Ramblers or the Jimmie Rodgers Entertainers. I guess you could say that the Ramblers "won" that little battle, but Jimmie Rodgers went in to record by himself, and the rest, as they say, is history. This is taken from the album, The Tenneva Ramblers, Puritan 3001, released in 1972. Your chances of finding a copy are slim, but if you do find one, it is worth the effort, as it contains some fine old time songs.

Miss Liza, Poor Gal

Oh, Miss Liza, poor gal, oh, miss Liza Jane,
Oh, Miss Liza, poor gal, ?too late to catch the train?.

I went to see Miss Liza, Miss Liza wasn't at home,
Her old man took the broomstick and dragged it o'er my bones.

That's it. repeat it as many times as you feel like it. The song is primarily a fiddle/banjo piece, with instrumental breaks after every two lines. Their version repeats the first two lines four times, and the second two lines three times. As far as the too late to catch the train phrase is concerned, I am pretty certain that is not right, but even after more than 20 years of listening to the song, I still can't tell. I guess this could qualify for mistakes made while listening to songs.
-Dale Rose; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2777 Goodbye Liza Jane; September 10, 1997

Here's an instrumental version of "Lil Liza Jane"

Thumbs & Curly - Lil Liza Jane
"pappyredux | December 08, 2007
You won't believe your eyes as the immortal Thumbs Carllile and Curly Chalker tear this old chestnut down. No extra charge for the rambling, nonsensical Red Foley outro!" [Red Foley sang a bit of the chorus at the end of that video.]

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LIZA JANE (Examples #6 & #7)
Here's a couple more versions to choose from:
I.

Scraping up sand in the bottom of the sea, Shiloh, Shiloh
Scraping up sand in the bottom of the sea, Shiloh, Liza Jane

CHORUS: Oh how I love her, Oh Liza Jane
Oh how I love her, Goodbye Liza Jane.

Black those shoes and make them shine, Shiloh, Shiloh etc.

A hump-back mule I'm bound to ride....

Hopped up a chicken and he flew upstairs...

II.

Liza up in the 'simmon tree, and the possum on the ground
Possum said, "You son of a gun, shake them 'simmons down."

CHORUS: Whoopee Liza, pretty little girl
Whoopee, Liza Jane.
Whoopee, Liza pretty little girl
She died on the train.

Cheeks are like the cherries, cherries like a rose.
How I like that pretty little girl, goodness gracious knows.

The old folks down in the mountains, grinding sugar cane.
Making barrels of molasses, for to sweeten old Liza Jane.

Whiskey by the gallon, sugar by the pound,
A great big bowl to put it in and Liza to stir it round.

I went to see my Liza Jane, she was standing in the door
Shoes and stockings in her hand and her feet all over the floor.

Her head is like a coffee pot, her nose is like a spout
Her mouth is like an old fireplace with the ashes all raked out.

I wouldn't marry a poor girl, I'll tell you the reason why.
She'd have so many poor kinfolks, she'd make my biscuits fly.

The hardest work I ever done, was a-brakin' on a train.
The easiest work I ever done, was huggin' little Liza Jane

The second version is from the singing of Bradley Kincaid. He was a professional entertainer who did mostly traditional based songs. He spent some time on the National Barn Dance and the Grand Ole Opry. This version is a blend of "Liza Jane" and "Possum Up a 'Simmon Tree" which were both minstrel songs. Note that many of the verses are not unique to "Liza Jane" but show up in versions of "Cindy" and "old Joe Clark". The second verse bears a resemblance to "Colorado Trail", and the fourth verse is similar to one in "Mary Anne". In the 1880's Eddie Cox, a minstrel show performer, published "Good-bye, Liza Jane" however he didn't claim any credit for writing it, just arranging it. In 1903 the Tin Pan Alley composer, Harry von Tilzer, published "Good-Bye, Eliza Jane" which was a different song altogether. In 1917 Cecil Sharp collected "Liza Anne" in Kentucky that also seems to blend Liza and the Piossum. Another version called "Liza Jane" was published in 1931 by Jean Thomas in a book "Devil's Ditties"
r-ich r ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2777 Goodbye Liza Jane; September 10, 1997

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GOOD BYE LIZA JANE (Examples #8)
Eddie Fox, 1871, pub. Lee & Weller

1. The time has come and I must go,
I must play on the old banjo.
Walk Dad Lew, Oh Mister Lew,
Ehe! Ehe! He!
Hear me now-

Chorus:
I'm going away to leave you, goodbye, goodbye,
I'm going away to leave you, goodbye Liza Jane.
I'm going away to leave you,
I'm going down to Lynchburg town;
If you get there before I do,
It's goodbye, Liza Jane.

2. The time has come, I do declare
I want a lock of my girl's hair.
Walk Dad Lew, Oh Mister Lew,
Ehe! Ehe! He!
Hear me now-

Chorus:

Behind the henhouse on my knees,
I thought I heard a chicken sneeze.
Walk Dad Lew, Oh Mister Lew,
Ehe! Ehe! He!
Hear me now-

Chorus:

"Twas nothing but a Rooster saying his prayers,
And giving out a hymn Such a getting upstairs.
Walk Dad Lew, Oh Mister Lew,
Ehe! Ehe! He!
Hear me now-

Chorus:

This is one of the oldest versions that we have a date for. The song is older; perhaps versions are preserved in old minstrel song booklets. Rich r mentions this song in a previous posting, but with the name mis-typed Cox. On the cover, it is listed as "Comic song, by Eddie Fox, as sung by Lew Simmons at the Arch Street Opera House." Like several other similar tunes, its origin usually is credited to minstrel shows, but probably based on old fiddle and play party songs.
Dicho ;
http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2777 Goodbye Liza Jane; July 7. 2002

Editor: In his next post to that thread, Dicho noted that "American Memory, Library of Congress, is the source for the Eddie Fox "Good bye Liza Jane."

Here's a video of a different version of "Goodbye Miss Liza"

Fiddlin' John Carson-Goodbye Liza Jane

BBYMRLCCOTN, Uploaded on Aug 3, 2010

****
GOODBYE SUSAN JANE (Example #9)
The following version of "Liza Jane" is from Vance Randolf's Songs of the Ozarks. He obtained it from Mrs. Joseph Pointer, of Cabool, MO. She called it "Goodbye Susan Jane"...

I went to see my Susan Jane, she met me at the door,
She told me that I needn't come to see her any more;
She'd fell in love with Rufus Andrew Jackson Paine,
I looked her in the face and said goodbye Susan Jane.

Oh Susan quit your foolin', and give my love to me,
Oh give me back my heart again, and I will let you be,
I once did love you dearly, I cannot love again,
I'm going away to leave you now, so goodbye Susan Jane.

Her mouth was like a cellar, her foot was like a ham
Her eyes were like and owl's at night, her voice was never calm,
Her hair was long and curly, she looked just like a crane,
I bid goodbye to all my love, so goodby Susan Jane.

Oh Susan, so deceiving, she'll never do to trust,
I threatened once to leave her, and leave her now I must
I never will trust another, to cause me any pain,
I trusted her, and all the girls are just like Susan Jane.
-raredance (rich r) ; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=18221 Lyr Req: Susan Jane ; February 19, 2000

Editor: from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vance_Randolph
"Vance Randolph (February 23, 1892 - November 1, 1980) was a famous folklorist who studied the folklore of the Ozarks in particular". The reference in the above post to Vance Randolf's Songs of the Ozarks may be to the collection entitled "Ozark Folk Songs (four-volume anthology, 1980)"

****
MISS LIZA JANE (Examples #10)
Gwine down by the pars'nage,
Now Liza you keep cool;
I hasn't got time to squeeze you,
I'se busy wid dis mule.

Cho.:
Whoa, mule, whoa,
Whoa, mule, I say;
Keep your seat Miss Liza Jane,
An' hang to dat sleigh.

De mule he jumped to one side,
De sleigh she went kerflap,
Broke my new suspenders,
She fell on my lap.
(from Alabama)

When I went to see Miss Liza Jane,
She was standin' in the door,
With shoes and stockin's in her hands
And feet all over the floor.
(from Tenn.)
As I went down de new cut road, she went down de lane.
Was the last time I saw my true love so go 'long, Liza Jane.
Go 'long, Liza Jane, go 'long, Liza Jane.

She went up the new cut road, I went down the lane,
Threw my hat in the corner of the fence,
Good-by, Liza Jane.
(Alabama)

Good-bye, Miss Eliza Jane,
I'm gwine to leab you;
Don't care, Miss Eliza Jane,
If it do grieb you.
Good-bye, Miss Eliza Jane, good-bye etc.

Go 'long, go 'long, go 'long, Liza Jane (3 times)
She died on the train.
(North Carolina)

These scattered verses from Newman L. White, American Negro Folk Songs.

Juba dis and Juba dat,
Juba shoot and kill a yellow cat,
Juba up and Juba down,
Juba shoot and missed the ground.

Cindy went to meetin',
She shouted and she squeeled;
She got so much religion
She broke her stockin' heel

I went up to the mountain
For to get a load of cane
To make a jug of 'lasses
Sweeter 'n Liza Jane.

Get along home, Cindy, Cindy (twice)
Fare you well.
(mixture of two songs)

My ole missus promised me
When she died she'd set me free.
She lived so long That her head got ball,
And the Lord couldn't kill her with a hickory mall.

(more floating verses from White)
-Dicho, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2777 Goodbye Liza Jane; July 7, 2002

Editor; Newman L. White, American Negro Folk Songs was published in 1928

**
See examples of "Cindy Cindy" on this page

****
LIL LIZA JANE (Example #12)
Af-Am version, collected by Natalie Curtis-Burlin, published 1919.

Lyr. Add: 'LIZA-JANE
("Stealin' Partners," Dance-song game)

Come ma love an' go wid me,
L'il 'Liza Jane
Come ma love an' go wid me,
L'il 'Liza Jane.

Chorus
O Eliza (or O Miss 'Liza)
L'il 'Liza Jane
O Eliza
L'il 'Liza Jane.

I got a house in Baltimo',
L'il 'Liza Jane
Street-car runs right by ma do',
L'il 'Liza Jane

I got a house in Baltimo',
L'il 'Liza Jane
Brussels carpet on* de flo'
L'il 'Liza Jane

I got a house in Baltimo'
L'il Liza Jane
Silver door-plate on* de do'
L'il 'Liza Jane

"When a number of people are dancing, all join in the chorus, and sometimes "O Eliza" is shouted at the top of their lungs. As this is a dance-song, dynamics are all broad, and consist chiefly in vociferous rhythmic accentuation. "O, Miss 'Liza" is sometimes sung..."

on* pronounced 'ohn.'
The provenance is not stated, but it may have been a song of the Calhoun Industrial School, which in some respects was modeled on the Hampton Institute.

Natalie Curtis-Burlin, 1918-19, "Negro Folk-Songs, The Hampton Series, Book IV, Work and Play-songs, pp. 158-167, with score. Dover reprint, 2001.

This dance-song is the precurser of the New Orleans marching song "L'il Liza Jane," set into sheet music by Countess Ada de Lachau and played by Earl Fuller (recording on Red Hot Jazz)
-Q, http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=8346 ; Little Liza Jane (kids' version) ; December 5, 2007

Editor: For another example of how the song "Liza Jane" is performed, here's an excerpt of a post written by Poppagator on May 10, 2007 in http://www.mudcat.org/thread.CFM?threadID=152 Lyr Req: O Eliza, little Liza Jane
"This is a VERY popular song in the New Orleans Brass Band repertoire, played and sung at every social-and-pleasure-club second line parade, every jazz funeral, etc. It has survived for decades, through many evolving changes in musical trends. People just love it, and no other song inspires a comparable level of audience-participation sing-along-ing on the chorus.

"Liza Jane" generally serves as a vehicle for newly improvided lyrics; you hear new two-line rhyming couplets every time you hear the song.

I was a little surprised to see the name "Eliza" in the title here. We generally pronounce it "L'il Liza," as in "HO! L'il Liza, L'il Liza Jane," with a very emphatic, percussive first-syllable "HO!"

For good examples of this song performed in contemporary New Orleans street-parade style, look up Kermit Ruffins (either as former frontman for the Rebirth Brass Band or with his own Barbeque Swingers), New Birth, Dirty Dozen, Hot 8, Nightcrawlers, Treme, Olympia, etc. All the brass bands play it, but without doing a bit of research, I'm not sure off the top of my head which ones and how many have released recordings."

Editor:
Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/mardi-gras-indian-songs-chants for a video and partial transcription of the words to an updated version of Little Liza Jane performed by New Orleans Mardi Gras Indians.

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GOODBYE LIZA JANE (Example #13)
Nobody's posting on here anymore, but I feel like posting the version we're singing in choir xD

Hey, ho the boatmen row!
Floating down the river on the Ohio
Hey, ho the boatmen row!
Floating down the river on the Ohio

Charlotte Town's burning down
Good-bye, good-bye
Burning down to the ground
Good-bye Liza Jane

Ain'tcha mighty sorry?
Good-bye, good-bye
Ain'tcha mighty sorry?
Good-bye Liza Jane

Black my boots and-a make them shine
Good-bye, good-bye
Black my boots and-a make them shine
Good-bye Liza Jane

Ain'tcha mighty sorry?
Good-bye, good-bye
Ain'tcha mighty sorry?
Good-bye Liza Jane

There's a gal in Baltimore
Good-bye, good-bye
Silver doorplate on her door
Lil Liza Jane

((now, here's where it gets a little weird with the sopranos and altos singing different parts)

Ain'tcha mighty sorry? (Oh, Eliza)
Good-bye, good bye (That lil Liza Jane)
Ain'tcha mighty sorry? (Oh, Eliza)
Good-bye Liza Jane

And then it repeats the first verse and the chorus and ta-da it's done.
-Guest, Annamarie; lhttp://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=101321&messages=18 Lyrics: Goodby Liza Jane; March 4, 2011

M, N, O
MASSA HAD A YELLA GAL

OH MARY DON'T YOU WEEP

Chorus:
Oh Mary don't you weep don't you moan
Oh Mary don't you weep don't you moan
Pharoah's army got drownded
Oh Mary don't you weep.

repeat entire chorus

Verse 1
Now I told you once
and I done told you twice
You can't get to heaven with a sweet heart and a wife.
Pharoahs army got drownded
Oh Mary don't you weep

Chorus

Verse 2
God made man. He made him out of clay.
Put him on earth but not to stay.
Pharoahs army got drownded
Oh Mary don't you weep

Chorus

Verse 3
I done told you once
I done told you twice
Set for hell from shootin dice*
Pharoahs army got drownded
Oh Mary don't you weep

Chorus

Verse 4
I done told you once
and I done told you twice
You can't get to heaven with a sweet heart and a wife.
Pharoahs army got drownded
Oh Mary don't you weep

Chorus

repeat chorus
- Georgia fieldhands, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDh2zRm1dwQ, (transcription by Azizi Powell)

*I'm not certain of "set for from" in the third line of verse #3. Also this transcription doesn't include the bass singer's line in the chorus before the Pharoah's army got drowned" line.
Here's that video

Georgia field hands - Mary Don't You Weep

loaded by madocseren on Oct 18, 2007

Times ain't like they used to be [videorecording] : early rural and popular American music, 1928-1935

**
OLD JOE CLARK
Editor: Old Joe Clark (OJC) is a standard American banjo/fiddle tune. The tune appears to date from the mid 19th century. The song came later, around 1900. There are countless versions of this song. For information about OJC click The Fiddler's Companion
http://www.ceolas.org/cgi-bin/ht2/ht2-fc2/file=/tunes/fc2/fc.html&style=... and The Traditional Ballad Index http://www.csufresno.edu/search?NS-search-page=document&NS-rel-doc-name=...

OLD JOE CLARK (Example #1)
Refrain:
Round and round old Joe Clark
Round and round I say
Round and round old Joe Clark
I ain't got long to stay.

1.
Old Joe Clark he had a house
Sixteen stories high
Every story in that house
Was full of chicken pie

2.
Rock a rock old Joe Clark
Rock a rock I'm gone.
Rock a rock old Joe Clark
and Goodlye, Susan Brown

3.
Fly around. old Joe Clark
Fly around I'm gone
Fly around old Joe Clark
with the golden slippers on

4.
Row around, old Joe Clark
Sail around and gone.
Row around, old Joe Clark
with the golden slippers on

5.
Roll, roll, old Joe Clark
Roll, roll, I say
Roll, roll, old Joe Clark
You'd better be gettin away

6.
If you see that girl of mine
Tell her if you can
Before she goes to make up bread
To wash those dirty hands

7.
I went down to old Joe's house
Bever been there before
He slept on the feather bed
I slept on the floor

8.
When I was a little boy
I used to play in ashes
Now I am a great big boy
Wearing Dad's mustaches
-Ruth Crawford Seeger, editor, iAmerican Folk Songs For Children (Garden City, New York, Doubleday & Company, pps 84-85 , 1948)

Editor:
Ruth Crawford Seeger gives this song the alternative name of "Round and Round" and credits it as a "well known square dance tune from Tennesee".

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #2)
Has anyone mentioned "Old Joe Clark" yet? Hedy West recorded a version of this song which seems to have Slavery references to it.

OLD JOE CLARK

Old Joe Clark is mad at me, I'll tell you the reason why;
I ran through his cabbage patch, and tore down all his rye.

CHORUS:
Walk Joe Clark, talk Joe Clark,
Goodbye Billy Brown,
Walk Joe Clark, talk Joe Clark,
I'm gonna leave this town.

I went down to Old Joe Clark's to get me a glass of wine;
He tied me up to his whupping post and gave me ninety-nine.

Old Joe Clark is dead and gone and I hope he's gone to hell!
He made me wear the ball and chain, and it made my ankles swell.
-Moira Cameron ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2864 Songs on, or about slavery? ; October 6. 1997

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #3)
from Bradley Kincaid's Favorite Old-Time Songs and Mountain Ballads, Book 3, 1930

Now I've got no money
Got no place to stay
I've got no place to lay my head
And the chickens a crowin' for day

Chorus:
Fare you well, old Joe Clark,
Fare you well I say
Fare you well, old Joe Clark,
I'm goin' away to stay.

I wish I had a nickel
I wish I had a dime
I wish I had a pretty little girl
To kiss her and call her mine.

I don't like that old Joe Clark
I'll tell you the reason why.
Ha goes about the country
A stealin' good men's wives.

I went down to old Joe Clark's
I did not mean no harm
He grabbed his old forty four
And shot me thru the arm.

Old Joe Clark's a mean old dog
I'll tell you the reason why
He tore down my old rail fence
So his cattle could eat my rye.

I went down to old Joe Clark's
I found old Joe in bed
I stuck my finger in old Joe's eye
And killed old Joe stone dead.

I wouldn't marry that old maid
I'll tell you the reason why
Her neck's so long and-stringy
I'm afraid she'll never die.

I went down to Dinah's house
She was standin' in the door
With her shoes and stocking in her hand
And her feet all over the floor.

Yonder sits a turtle dove
Sitting on yonder pine
You may weep for your true love
And I shall weep for mine.

Old Joe Clark's a mighty man
What will it take to please him
A good old bottle of apple jack
And Betty Brown to squeeze him.
-Guest; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25394; Old Joe Clark. THE folk song/tune? (excerpt of post); September 16, 2000

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #4)
The verses are endless. A few more:
I went down to Old Joe Clark's, I did not go to stay.
I got stuck on a little old girl, Stayed there half a day.
I went down to Old Joe Clark's, I hadn't been there before.
He slept on the feather bed, I slept on the floor.
Old Joe Clark's a mean old man, Mean as he can be.
He threw my dog out in the rain, Then he threw out me.
Old Joe Clark's a dang old dog, Old Joe Clark will steal.
Old Joe Clark's a dang old dog, but he can't go through my field.
Old Joe Clark went courtin', And what do you reckon she said?
She said she wouldn't marry him 'Til all the rest were dead.
Old Joe Clark's a mean old man, Tell you the reason why.
He spits tobacco on the floor and never shuts his fly.
The higher up the cherry tree, the sweeter grows the cherry.
The more you hug and kiss a gal, The more she wants to marry.

In the unlikely event that you ever run out of verses, you can sing all of the verses to "Barbara Allen" and "Mary Hamilton" to the tune, while ignoring the looks.
-Bud Savoie; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25394; Old Joe Clark. September 16, 2000

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #5)
I HAD a Bradley Kincaid 78 of this song, one additional verse was: I went down to old joe's house, old joe wasn't at home I ate all the meat that old joe had and left old joe the bones.
-Dewey, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25394; Old Joe Clark. THE folk song/tune? (excerpt of post); September 17, 2000

Editor:
Bradley Kincaid was an Anglo-American folk singer. Here's more information about Mr. Kincaid from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradley_Kincaid
William Bradley Kincaid (July 13, 1895 - September 23, 1989) was an American folk singer and radio entertainer.He was born in Point Level, Garrard County, Kentucky but built a music career in the northern states. His first radio appearance came in 1926 when he performed on the National Barn Dance show on WLS-AM in Chicago, Illinois. A prolific composer of folk and country music tunes, the first edition of his 1928 songbook called My Favorite Mountain Ballads sold more than 100,000 copies;[1] later editions brought the total to 400,000. He recorded on Gennett Records."

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #6)
Just realised I hadn't seen this one that made the most sense after I learned to play Pitch.
Joe Clark was a preacher's son, Preached all o'er the plain, The only text that he did know, Was High, Low, Jack, and Game.
And the bloomin' song has been going through my head for a day now!
-CamiSue; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25394; Old Joe Clark. THE folk song/tune?; September 21, 2000

Editor:
Here's information from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitch_(card_game) about "Pitch" and the commonly found line "High, Low, Jack, and Game":
"Pitch is an American trick-taking card game derived from the English game of All Fours (Seven Up). Historically, Pitch started as "Blind All Fours", a very simple All Fours variant that is still played in England as a pub game...

Two or more players play individually or in equal-sized teams, seated alternatingly. Normal play rotation is clockwise...

It may happen that at the end of a deal more than one player reaches the number of points necessary to win the game. In this case the order in which the points are rewarded becomes crucial: Any points won by the pitcher are counted first. Thereafter the remaining points are awarded in the order as listed above, i.e. first High, then Low, then Jack, then Game"

-snip-
The floating line "High, Low, Jack, and Game" may be the source of the British children's playground rhyme "High, Low, Jackalo" (also known as High Low Peccalow". Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/handclap-jump-rope-and-elastics-rhymes for examples of that handclap rhyme.

I believe that the handclap rhyme "High Low Jackalo" is the source of the African American originated foot stomping cheer "Gigalo". Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/foot-stomping-cheers-0
for examples of that cheer.

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #7)
Please, help me with this Fiddlin' John Carson's recording. I completely miss one stanza. It seems it is about a yeller gal/yellow girl. I'm not sure of the chorus: it doesn't seem he sings exactly "Bye, Betsy Brown", nor I'm sure of "Walk home, Old Joe Clark": it could be "walk on, walk along,,,"... Thanks. R

Fare You Well, Old Joe Clark
Fiddlin' John Carson

Now I've got no money
Got nowhere to stay
Got no place to lay my head
By the chickens crowin' for day

Fare you well, old Joe Clark
Bye, Betsy Brown
Walk home, old Joe Clark
Goin' to leave this town

Wished I had a nickel
I wished I had a dime
I wished I had a pretty little girl
To kiss her and call her mine

Fare you well, old Joe Clark
Bye, Betsy Brown
Walk home, old Joe Clark
Goin' to leave this town

Walk home, old Joe Clark
Bye, Betsy Brown

Would not marry an old maid
I'll tell you the reason why
Her neck's so long and stringy
I'm afraid she'll never die

Fare you well, old Joe Clark
Bye, Betsy Brown
Walk home, old Joe Clark
Goin' to leave this town

I went down to Dinah's
Standin' in the door
With shoes and stocking in her hand
Her feet all over the floor

Fare you well, old Joe Clark
Bye, Betsy Brown
Walk home, old Joe Clark
Goin' to leave this town
-Roberto; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=107895 ; Lyr Add: OLD JOE CLARK (Fiddlin' John Carson) ; January 20, 2008

Editor:
Fiddler John Carson was an Anglo-American musician. Here is more information from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiddlin'_John_Carson
"Fiddlin' John Carson (March 23, 1868 – December 11, 1949) was an American old time fiddler and an early-recorded country musician...On April 1, 1913 Carson performed at the first annual "Georgia Old-Time Fiddlers' Convention", held at the Municipal Auditorium in Atlanta,[6][7] where he only became fourth.[8] But between 1914 and 1922 he was proclaimed "Champion Fiddler of Georgia" seven times."...

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #8)
Hi Roberto,

Carson recorded 'Old Joe Clark' again in 1927 with the more familiar chorus and lyrics. The chorus of this 1923* recording is anybody's guess. The best I can make of it is:
Fare you well old Joe Clark
Bye then Betsy Brown
(To home, to home) Old Joe Clark [Could be 'to horse, to horse]
Goin' to leave this town

I hear your missing stanza as follows (I'm not certain of 'close', but I reckon the rest is right):

Once I bought a yella girl
And I brought her from the South
The hair's around her head so tight
Couldn't (close) her mouth

Places where I hear something different from your transcription are:

S1, L1 'Now I got no money'
S1, L4 'By the chicken' a-crowin' for day'

S2 'Wish' rather than 'wished' in each instance
S2, L4 'Whistle and call her mine'

S4, L3 It sounds more to me like 'strandy' albeit 'stringy' would seem more apt.

S5, L3 I hear 'stockings'
S5, L4 'Feet' is grammatical, but I think he sings 'foot'
-Stewie; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=107895 ; Lyr Add: OLD JOE CLARK (Fiddlin' John Carson) ; January 21, 2008

* The poster first gave the date of 1924 but quckly corrected it to 1923 in his next comment to that thread.

Here's a video of an instrumental version of "Old Joe Clark"

coolmornings79 | November 24, 2006
a little pickin, sitting on the running board of our 1930 model A Ford.

****
OLD JOE CLARK (Example #9)
Old Joe Clark, the peacher's song
Preached all over the plain
The only text he ever used was
"High, low, jack, and the game."

Chorus
Round and round Old Joe Clark
Round and round, I say
Heid follow me ten thousand miles,
To hear my fiddle play.

I used to live on mountain top
But now I live in town.
I'm boarding at the big hotel.
Courting Betsy Brown.

Chorus

When I was a little girl
I used to play with toys;
Now I am a bigger girl.
I'd rather play with boys.

Chorus

When I was s little boy,
I used to want a knife;
Now I am a bigger boy,
I only want a wife.

Chorus

Wish I was a sugar tree.
Standin' in the middle of sometown,
Ev'ry time a pretty girl passed,
I'd shake some sugar down.

Chorus

Old Joe had a yellow cat,
She would not sing or may
Dhe stuck her head in a buttermilk jar
And washed her sins away.

Chorus

I wishe I had a sweethesrt,
I'd set her on the shelf
And ev'ry time she'd smile at me
I;d get up there myself.
-Jerry Silverman; Songs Of The Great Outdoors (Pacific, Missouri; Mel Bay, p. 87 (1991)

****
OLD ZIP COON (Example #1)
"Zip Coon" which was popular in the 1830's was one of the earliest pieces of music used extensively by black-face singers before the advent of the minstrel shows. The Zip Coon character was an urban dandy, the complete opposite of the Jim Crow character who was depicted as rural. The unofficial garb for Zip Coon included a blue long-tailed jacket, a frilly lacey front shirt, watch fob and jewelry. At least 3 different performers claimed to have written the song. George Washington Dixon who is mentioned on the cover of sheet music published by J.L. Hewitt & Co. sometime between 1830 and 1835 ( a reprint of this sheet music can be found in: Popular Songs of Nineteenth-Century America by Richard Jackson, Dover Publications 1976). George Nichols who was an early blackface clown in circuses. Bob Farrell, who was actually known as "Zip Coon", and is known to have performed it in New York in 1834. Below are the lyrics as contained in the sheet music. Most of the odd spellings are in the original and I will try not to add too many new ones.

Oh, ole Zip Coon he is a larned skolar,
Oh ole Zip Coon he is a larned skolar,
Oh, ole Zip Coon he is a larned skolar,
Sings posum up a gum tree an' coony in a holler.
Posum up a gum tree, Coony on a stump,
Posum up a gum tree, Coony on a stump,
Posum up a gum tree, Coony on a stump,
Den over dubble trubble Zip Coon will jump.

Chorus: (To the first part of the tune)
O Zip a duden duden duden zip a duden day.
O Zip a duden duden duden duden duden day.
O Zip a duden duden duden duden duden day.
O Zip a duden duden duden zip a duden day.

O it's old Suky blue skin, she is in lub wid me,
I went the udder arternoon to take a dish ob tea;
What do you tink now, Suky hab for supper,
Why chicken foot an posum heel, widout any butter.

Did you eber see the wild goose, sailing on de ocean,
O de wild goose motion is a bery pretty notion;
Ebry time de wild goose beckons to de swaller,
You hear him google google google google gollar.

I went down to Sandy Hollar to ther arternoon
And the first man I chanced to meet war ole Zip Coon;
Ole Zip Coon he is a natty skolar,
For he plays upon de Banjo "Cooney in de hollar."

My old Missus she's mad wid me,
Kase I wouldn't go wid her into Tennessee,
Mass build him barn and put in de fodder,
'Twas dis ting and dat ting, one ting or odder.

I pose you heard ob de battle New Orleans
Whar ole Gineral Jackson gib de British beans;
Dare de Yankee boys do de job so slick,
For dey cotch old Packenham and rowed him up de creek.

I hab many tings to tork about, but don't know wich come fust,
So here de toast to old Zip Coon before he gin to rust;
May he hab de pretty girls, like de King ob ole,
To sing dis song so many times,fore he turns to mole.
-rich r ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7876; Old Zip Coon
December 4, 1998

Editor: The tune "Old Zip Coon" is now known as "The Turkey In The Straw"

****
OLD ZIP COON (Example #2)
Here's another version similar to what rich r posted above, but with some different verses:

Transcribed from the sheet music images at the Library of Congress American Memory Collection:

ZIP COON
[1834]

1. O ole Zip Coon he is a larned skoler
O ole Zip Coon he is a larned skoler
O ole Zip Coon he is a larned skoler
Sings possum up a gum tree an coony in a holler
Possum up a gum tree, coony on a stump
Possum up a gum tree, coony on a stump
Possum up a gum tree, coony on a stump
Den over dubble trubble, Zip Coon will jump.

CHORUS: O zip a duden duden duden zip a duden day.
O zip a duden duden duden duden duden day.
O zip a duden duden duden duden duden day.
O zip a duden duden duden zip a duden day.

2. O its old Suky blue skin, she is in lub wid me,
I went the udder arter noon to take a dish ob tea;
What do you tink now, Suky hab for supper,
Why chicken foot an possum heel, widout any butter.

3. Did you eber see the wild goose, sailing on de ocean,
O de wild goose motion is a bery pretty notion;
Ebry time de wild goose, beckens to de swaller,
You hear him google google google google goller.

4. I tell you what will happin den, now bery soon,
De Nited States Bank will be blone to de moon;
Dare General Jackson, will him lampoon,
An de bery nex President, will be Zip Coon.

5. An wen Zip Coon our President shall be,
He make all de little Coons sing posum up a tree;
O how de little Coons, will dance an sing,
Wen he tie dare tails togedder, cross de lim dey swing.

6. Now mind wat you arter, you tarnel kritter Crocket,
You shant go head widout old Zip, he is de boy to block it,
Zip shall be President, Crocket shall be vice,
An den dey two togedder, will hab de tings nice.

7. I hab many tings to tork about, but don't know wich come first,
So here de toast to old Zip Coon, before he gin to rust;
May he hab de pretty girls, like de King ob ole,
To sing dis song so many times, fore he turn to mole.
-Jim Dixon ; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=7876; Old Zip Coon; January 2, 2004

Editor:
For the record (no pun intended), "old Suky blue skin" refers to a dark skinned Black woman whose name is "Suky". "Suky" (Sukey) is a nickname for "Susan".

P, Q, R

S, T, U
SAIL AWAY LADIES
It seem the first version of Sail Away Ladies is found in Talley's Negro Folk Rymes p. 20 from 1920. It can be viewed on-line through a book search. Kuntz also includes them on-line. Here they are:

Sail away, ladies! Sail away!
Sail away, ladies! Sail away!
Nev' min' what dem white folks say,
May de Mighty bless you. Sail away!

Nev' min' what you daddy say,
Shake yo liddle foot an' fly away,
Nev' min' if yo' mammy say:
"De Devil'll git you." Sail away!

Macon's lyric version (not in the DT?) was done in 1927. The Talley rhyme includes lyrics found in Sally Ann, a very similar song. The Hill Billies in 1925 used the line "Shake you little foot Sally Ann." Since Sally Ann also includes the "Sail away" lyric it makes it difficult to separate the two songs.
-Richie; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97649 origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies; December 31. 2006

Editor: Thomas W. Talley's Negro Folk Rhymes, Wise And Otherwise was originally published in 1922.

"Macon" refers to the Anglo-American artist "Uncle Dave Macon". Here's a comment about Uncle Dave Macon:

"Uncle Dave's ..had more or less put it together from floating rhymes that he had heard from blacks while growing up. I like whoever used that verb "Words ASSEMBLED by Uncle Dave"

Uncle Dave, David Harrison Macon. is an Interesting Character. Born 1870, son of a Confederate officer who ran a boardinghouse/hotel; he was one of the best banjo-playing entertainers of all time. His music so clearly shows the black influences that Jon Pankake quotes a story of an elderly black man in the 1940s (remember, the Opry is radio only!) on being told that DeFord Bailey was the only black on the Grand Ole Opry, said, indignantly, "What about Uncle Dave?" Since we have such fragmentary records of what black people were singing and playing in those years (and thanks to Talley for giving us all that he found!) much of what we know is filtered through Dave Macon. "
-Guest, Pete Peterson
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=102897; Sail Away Ladies (Don't You Rock Me, Daddy-o) ; June 29, 2007

****
SAIL AWAY LADIES (Version #2)
Here's what I hear Uncle Dave Macon singing:

Uncle Dave Macon and His Fruit Jar Drinkers Vo 5155
Banjo and lead vocal- Uncle Dave Macon; Fiddle- Maizi Todd;
(Fiddle w/banjo intro)

Ever I get my new house done,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
Give my old one to my son.
(Sail away Ladies, sail away.)

*[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o,
Don't she rock die-dee-o,
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/ verse]

Ever I get my new house done,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
Give my old one to my son.
(Sail away Ladies, sail away.)

[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/ verse]

Ain't no use to grieve and cry,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
You'll be an angel bye and bye,
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)

[Three lines of chorus by fiddle]
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/verse]

Come along boys and go with me
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)
We'll go back to Tennessee
(Sail away Ladies, sail away)

[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental chorus/verse]

[one line of chorus by fiddle]
Chorus: Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o
Don't she rock die-dee-o.

[instrumental]

*the unusual thing is Uncle Dave doeesn't sing on the first line of the chorus.
-Richie; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97649 origin and lyr: Sail Away Ladies; December 31. 2006

**
Here's a video of Uncle Dave Macon -Sail Away Ladies

-BBYMRLCCOTN | December 08, 2009
Uncle Dave Macon-Sail Away Ladies

-snip-

Here's a video of Odetta singing "Sail Away Ladies"

MarciaFrazaolua | April 21, 2010
From "Living with the blues"

-snip-

It's interesting that Odetta sings "daddy-o" instead of "di-dee-o".

Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/african-american-secular-slave-songs to find words to "Lead A Man" that includes the "di-dee-oh" refrain. Also, click http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=97649#1926453 Origin: Sail Away Ladies
to find words to a children's song called "Tideo" which may have its origins in that phrase.

****
SALLY ANN (Version # 1)
Did you ever see a muskrat, Sally Ann
Dragging his slick tail through the sand
Picking his banjo & raising sand
Did you ever see a muskrat, Sally Ann

CH: Ever see a muskrat Sally Ann (2x)

Shift that meal & save the bran
Going to the wedding with Sally Ann
Shake that little foot Sally Ann
You're a pretty good dancer Sally Ann

CH: Shake that little foot Sally Ann (2x)

Make my living in the sandy land
Raise big 'taters in the sandy land
Big mushmelons in the sandy land
Sandy bottom, sandy land

CH: I'm gonna marry you Sally Ann (2x)

Sal's got a meatskin laid away
To grease that wooden leg so they say
Dinah's got a wooden leg so they say
Shake that wooden leg Dinah-o

CH: Shake that wooden leg Dinah, Dinah
Shake that wooden leg Dinah-o

From "Folk Songs Of North America" by Alan Lomax. I gotta say that parts of the last verse to me are quite suspect along with the 3rd verse sounds like it was more than just a floating filler borrowed from "Sandy Land". Anyway, there you go. Barry
-Barry Finn; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13719 Sally Ann ; September 14, 1999

**
Here's a video of "Sally Ann"

banjostead | November 19, 2008
Flatt and Scruggs - Sally Ann

**
Here's a comment from that video's viewer comment thread:
"An awesome version, played by Earl & Paul here in the fast 'bluegrass' beat. And .. this fabulous, famous old-time tune sounds equally as stupendous when played in the old way .. like they used to do a long time ago .. in 3/4 time. At that slower pace, all of the delightful little nuances which are intrinsically present in this song come to the fore. A great e.g. can be found on track 11, side 1, of Folkways LP FA2434 .. 37th O.T.F. Convention, Union Grove, N.C. 1962. Group : "The Oldtimers"."
-colindominy (2010)

****
SALLY ANN (Version # 2)
There is a version in Brown, North Carolina Folklore. Vol. 5, No. 673, music and one verse.
O, where are you going, Sally Ann? (3 times)
I'm going to the wedding, Sally Ann.
O, shake that little foot, Sally Ann, (3 times)
You're a pretty good dancer, Sally Ann.

No data on source or date, but reference is made to SharpK 11 351 No. 240 (jig) and to JAFL 28, 183 and JAFL 41 no. 8 and 59 p. 462.
-Q; http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=13719 Sally Ann ; January 28, 2003

**
Here's another instrumental version entitled "Pat That Little Foot Sally Anne":

banjochuck | March 29, 2008
An Old-Time fiddle tune from "Fear No Weevil". Dave Forbes, Fiddle; Vic Call, Guitar; Piper Call, Feet; Chuck Levy 6=string fretless Banjo.

**
Here's a comment from the video's uploader:
This music is called "old-time". THe dancing would probably be called "flat=foot clogging". hte banjo is a 6 string fretless played clawhammer style. Thanks for asking
-banjochuck (2009)

**
I found this video of a R&R song called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Anne" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BWAmP0_V6A
It seems obvious to me that the refrain of this song is based on the old timey song "Pat Your Little Foot Sally Ann". Here's a comment from that video'e uploader:
"This cool tune was released on Domain 1404 in 1964 and made it to # 61 on the charts. the song is promoting the Slauson, a popular dance in the LA area (according to google)."...

****
SALLY ANN (Version # 3)
(Chorus?)
Shake your little foot Sally Ann.
All night long with Sally Ann.
I'm gone home with Sally Ann.

All night long with Sally Ann.
Shake your little foot Sally Ann.
I'm goin home with Sally Anne.

Verse 1
Sally in the garden sifting sand.
Sue's upstairs with the hogeye man.
All night long with Sally Ann.
Shake your little foot Sally Ann.
I'm goin home with Sally Anne.

Verse 2
Sally in the garden feedin’ your gums
Sal, let me chew your rosin [usually pronounced ‘rosum’] some
I’m goin [chokes on this word, tho] home with Sally Anne.

Chorus
Shake your little foot Sally Ann.
All night long with Sally Ann
I'm goin home with Sally Ann.

Shake your little foot Sally Ann.
All night long with Sally Ann
I'm goin home with Sally Ann.
- Fiddlin' John Carson-Sally Ann ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AL4jMURXgdQ&feature=related (transcription, Azizi Powell, 1/19/201, Bob Fulcher 12/24/2012) *

Here's that video:

-BBYMRLCCOTN | March 05, 2010
Fiddlin' John Carson-Sally Ann

-snip-
*I received a transcription of the lyrics for verse 2 via email from Bob Fulcher on 12/24/2012
Here's the pertinent excerpt from that email:
" “Sal, let me chew your rosin some” is a floating verse. Curly Fox used is his version of “Fire on the Mountain,” which he released under the “Sal” title. It shows up here and there elsewhere. I’ve never heard the preceding line elsewhere, but John Carson could have made it up, so he could use the “rosin” line, or maybe it was an old couplet that is documented only by this recording. He chokes on his words in the line that follows, but I’m pretty sure he is just going back to the standard refrain.

A note of considerable insignificance, I’m sure JC is saying “I’m goin’ home” in his refrains, which has essentially the same pronunciation as “gone,” but all the other versions I’ve heard use the present tense."...
-snip-
I changed the word "gone" to "goin" as per the above comments.

Thanks, Bob for that transcription and for your important musical work!
-snip-
Here's another comment about this song:
.."There are so many different versions of Sally Ann. And there isn't .10 cents worth of difference between a couple of the versions of Sally Ann and Sail Away Ladies. "...
-Guest Don; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=10199 Lyr Req: Sally Ann (tune: Sail Away Ladies) ; November 27, 2005
-snip-
Click http://www.cocojams.com/content/childrens-rhymes-cheers for Little Sally Ann/ Sittin In The Sand (Little Sally Walker/Sittin In The Saucer)

****
SHADY GROVE (Example #1)
Chorus:
Shady Grove, my little love, Shady Grove I say
Shady Grove, my little love, I'm bound to go away

Ist verse
went to see my little Shady Grove
she was standing by the door
shoes and her stockin's in her hand
little bare feet on the floor

2nd verse
When I was a little boy I wanted a Barlow knife
now I want Shady Grove to say she'll be my wife

3rd verse
I wish I had me a big fine horse and corn to feed him all
And Shady Grove to stay at home and feed him while I'm gone

4th verse
Cheeks the color of a bloomin' rose and eyes of the prettiest brown
She's the darlin' of my heart, prettiest gal in town

5th verse
A kiss from pretty little Shady Grove is sweeter than brandy wine
Ain't no girl in this whole world that's prettier than mine.
- mary; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15883 ; Shady Grove ; December 5, 1999 [post changed to verse form]

Here's a video of a version of "Shady Grove"

nickogawa | January 10, 2007
I love this song. It's a traditional folk/bluegrass song that's been handed down and evolved in various ways over time. There are tons of different versions out there. I originally learned it from a friend, who had learned it from the Jerry Garcia and David Grisman "Pizza Tapes."

****
SHADY GROVE (Example #2)
Chorus:
Shady grove, my little miss
Shady grove my darlin'
Shady grove my little miss
I'm goin back to Harlan

If you see my little miss
If you see my darlin'
If you see my little miss
Tell her I'm goin' to Harlan
(Chorus)
Ev'ry time I walk this road
It's always dark and cloudy
Ev'ry time I see that gal
I alwyas tell her "Howdy"
(Chorus)

Skaggs has some different verses, and Stanley does as well, but this is the "heart" of the "Shady Grove" done by the bluegrass folks.

The other "shady grove" is a minor-key tune about some stalker guy who wishes he could be with this girl...

...Wish I had an old banjo
Strung with golden twine
an' ev'ry song I played on it
would help to make her mine
Chorus:
Shady grove, my little love
Shady grove I say
Shady grove my little love
You're bound to go away
-Guest [Anahootz]; http://www.mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=15883 ; Shady Grove ; May 29, 2002

****
SHADY GROVE (Example #3)
Lyrics I have are from Folk Songs of North America by Alan Lomax 1960.

CHORUS: Shady Grove, my true love, Shady Grove, I know,
Shady Grove, my true love, I'm bound for the Shady Grove.

Peaches in the summertime, apples in the fall,
If I can't get the girl I love, I won't have none at all.

Once I was a little boy, playin' in the sand.
Now I am a great big boy, I think myself a man.

When I was a little boy, I wanted a whittlin' knife.
Now I am a great big boy an' I want a little wife.

Wish I had a banjo string made of golden twine,
And every tune I'd pick on it is "Wish That Girl Were Mine".

Some come here to fiddle and dance; some come here to tarry.
Some come here to fiddle and dance; I come here to marry.

Ev'ry night when I go home, my wife I try to please her.
The more I try, the worse she gets. Damned if I don't leave her.

Fly around, my blue eyed girl. Fly around, my daisy.
Fly around, my blue eyed girl. Nearly drive me crazy.

The very next time I go that road, and it don't look so dark and grazy,
The very next time I go that road, I'll stop and see my daisy.

I once had a mulie cow, mulie when she was born.
Took a jaybird 40 years to fly from horn to horn.

Chord progression is: Dm (C) I Dm (C) Dm I Dm C I Am Dm I

Editor:
See this excerpt of a comment from kytrad (Jean Ritchie) writing in March 19, 2006 from that same comment therad "... Most of the 'travelin verses' are from 'Cindy.' And the Lomax version has a verse or two from, 'Fly Round my Pretty Little Miss.' But I guess that's legal enough- JR"

****
SOURWOOD MOUNTAIN
Chickens a-crowin' on Sourwood Mountain,
Hey, ho, diddle-um day.
So many pretty girls I can't count 'em,
Hey ho, diddle-um day.

My true love's a blue-eyed daisy,
She won't come and I'm too lazy.

Big dog bark and little one bite you,
Big girl court and little one spite you.

My true love's a blue-eyed daisy,
If I don't get her, I'll go crazy.

My true love lives at the head of the holler,
She won't come and I won't foller.

My true love lives over the river,
A few more jumps and I'll be with her.

Ducks in the pond, geese in the ocean,
Devil's in the women if they take a notion.
- http://www.traditionalmusic.co.uk/folk-song-lyrics/Sourwood_Mountain.htm

Here's a video of this song:

kickwurmz | May 14, 2007
The band JUGment Day performs Sourwood Mountain. Baddesst Jug Band in Vegas.

****
SUGAR IN MY COFFEE (Example #1)

Sugar In My Coffee.wmv

Uploaded by 28fiddles on Dec 22, 2011

Old Timey Fiddle Tune played by Jim West on fiddle, Frank Sole on guitar and fiddlesticks, Ed Roffman on bass.....which was the Frosty Morning String Band. This cut was taken from a performance at the Minstrel Coffeehouse around Thanksgiving in 1989
-snip-
An example of the related song "Tideo" is found below.

Click http://cocojams.com/content/sugar-my-coffee-o-fiddle-song-early-sources-... for a Cocojams post on "Sugar In My Coffee".

****
(WOULDN'T GIVE ME SUGAR IN MY COFFEE as sung by Uncle Dave Macon). Example #2 of "Sugar In My Coffee-O

"Instrumental [banjo] introduction.

[Spoken] Hot dog! People, you know, a gentleman asked me last night what I was doing. I said, 'Well, sir, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, I don't do anything'. He says, 'Well, what do you do on Thursday, Friday and Saturday?' I says, 'Why, I rest'. He says, 'You do anything on Sunday?' 'Oh, yes sir, that's my busiest day'. He says, 'What are you doing on Sunday?' I says, 'Getting ready to do nothing on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday'. Ha! Ha!

I'll be dogged if I can see,
How my little honey got away from me,
Been there once, I'm going home,
Wouldn't give me sugar in my coffee-o

Just one thing that bothers my mind,
A world full of women and none of 'em mine
Been there once, I'm going home,
Wouldn't give me sugar in my coffee-o

Well try to look for a needle in the sand,
Try to find a woman that's got no man
Been there once, I'm going home,
Wouldn't give me sugar in my coffee-o

Jaybird sitting on a hickory limb,
Picked up brickbat took him on the chin -
hi-ho mister don't you do that again,
Brother, you'll kick the bark off a seasoned hickory limb
Been there once, I'm going home,
Wouldn't give me sugar in my coffee-o

Preacher went to Florida,
the truth to tell, he went to Miami at a big hotel,
He went to the beach and the bathing was fine,
Sued for divorce in an hour's time
Been there once, I'm going home,
Wouldn't give me sugar in my coffee-o

Never you mind what your mammy say,
Shake your little foot and sail away,
Been there once, I'm going home,
Wouldn't give me sugar in my coffee-o"

Source: transcription of Uncle Dave Macon 'Wouldn't Give Me Sugar In My Coffee' recorded on 8 September 1926 and issued as Vocalion 15440 in December 1926 [also as Vocalion 5002 in February 1927]. Reissued on Uncle Dave Macon 'Wait 'Till The Clouds Roll By 1926-1939' Historical LP HLP-8006 [1975].

Fiddlin' John Carson's 'Little More Sugar In The Coffee' [Okeh 45542] is one stanza only. It is repeated with the third line left out and the last line is repeated in isolation.

Prettiest girl in the country-o
Daddy and mammy both said so
All dolled up in calico
Little more sugar in the coffee
- Stewie, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40593 , Lyr Req: Sugar In My Coffee, January 21, 2003
-snip-
Here's a comment posted on May 19, 2009 that same discussion thread iabout that transcription:-

"Chorus: Been there once, I wouldn't go no mo'

That badly mixed up 4th verse is usually something like:

Jaybird sittin' on a hickory limb,
He looked at me and I looked at him,
Picked up a brickbat, hit him on the chin,
Great Godamighty, don't you do that again.

My theory on the hash Uncle Dave makes of it is that the A&R man, or perhaps Uncle Dave himself, decided that divine reference was disrespectful and it caused Uncle Dave to lose track and mess up the verse. He was a pretty good improviser on the spot, but this one tied him in knots."

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SUGAR IN MY COFFEE. Example #3 of "Sugar In My Coffee-O
From an article "Some Play-Party Games of the Middle West" by Edwin F. Piper, in The Journal of American Folk-Lore, Vol XXVIII, 1915, page 281:

B. (Western Iowa, 1900.)

1. First your heel, and then your toe,
And I'll take sugar in my coffee, O.

2. How do you think my mammy knows,
I take sugar in my coffee, O.

3. Cornstock fiddle and a shoestring bow,
And I take sugar in my coffee, O.

4. Sugar's high and coffee's low,
And I take sugar in my coffee, O.
-Jim Dixon, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40593 , Lyr Req: Sugar In My Coffee, May 20, 2009

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TIDEO [Also known as "Jingle At The Window"]

Jingle At The Window, Tidy-O

Uploaded by davidbragger on Mar 9, 2007

Wonderful tune from Illinois fiddler Mel Durham
-snip-
"Tideo" ("Jingle At The Window", "Pass One Window") is also a play party song.

Click http://cocojams.com/content/childrens-game-songs-and-movement-rhymes for information, text examples, and videos of the play party versions of this song.

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TURKEY IN THE STRAW (Example #1)
(Traditional Song Lyrics)

As I was a-goin'
On down the road
With a tired team
And a heavy load
I cracked my whip
And the leader sprung
I says day-day
To the wagon tongue

Turkey in the straw
Turkey in the straw
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw

Went out to milk
And I didn't know how
I milked the goat
Instead of the cow
A monkey sittin'
On a pile of straw
A winkin' at
His mother-in-law

Turkey in the straw
Turkey in the straw
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw

I came to the river
And I couldn't get across
So I paid five dollars
For a big bay hoss
Well, he wouldn't go ahead
And he wouldn't stand still
So he went up and down
Like an old saw mill

Turkey in the straw
Turkey in the straw
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw

Did you ever go fishin'
On a warm summer day
When all the fish
Were swimmin' in the bay
With their hands in their pockets
And their pockets in their pants
Did you ever see a fishie
Do the Hootchy-Kootchy Dance?

Turkey in the straw
Turkey in the straw
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw
-http://www.songsforteaching.com/folk/turkeyinthestraw.htm ; retrieved January 11, 2011

**

TURKEY IN THE STRAW (Example #2)
1.
Oh I had a girl and she was good
But one of her legs was made of wood.
Her hair was false and her teeth was too
And there wasn't much for me to do.

Chorus:
Turkey in the straw
Turkey in the hay.
Hey! What did you say?
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw

2,
My wife says I'm just like a goose
'Cause I chew snooze to beat the dooze.*
She said "What's the use of chewin the snooze
When you gotta spit out most of the juice.

Chorus:
Turkey in the straw
Turkey in the grass
I get A kick out of that ____ [the singer is kicked in the "butt" by another member of the group]
Roll 'em up and twist 'em up
A high tuck a-haw
And hit 'em up a tune called
Turkey in the Straw
-Schnickelfritz Band (1942)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lnUjERsFLlo&feature=related l transcribed from the video by Azizi Powell, January 2011

* I'm not sure that the words "snooze" and "dooze" are correct. I'm pretty certain that "dooze" means "chewing tobacco" and "snooze probably means "sleep".

Here's that video:

bloodboiler666 | October 26, 2007
Schnickelfritz Band from 1942

Editor: The video uploader indicated in this video's title that it was the first version of this song. That reference might mean the first filmed version. However, several viewers mentioned the 1935 Walt Disney animated film that included this 19th century tune.

Here are several viewer comments from that video: http://www.youtube.com/comment_servlet?all_comments=1&v=VsnZxfkkoKQ

"I learned it like this "AS i was going down the road with a wagon team and heavy load i whiped the horses and they started to ring and i yelled "YEH HA!" and the fun began. Turkey in the straw_____ Turkey in the hay____ roll them up and twist them up and do a high tucka hall then hit him with a tune called Turkey in the Straw." we sing this in Choir :p "
-Summoner7 (2008)

**
"Classic old-time novelty song. :) Of course I learned it with different lyrics:

"Oh, I had a little chicken
And it wouldn't lay an egg
So I poured hot water up and down its leg
And the little chicken cried
And the little chicken begged
Then the little chicken laid a hard-boiled egg."
-groovymarlin (2008)

**
This is not the first version because it appers on the disney cartoon "The Band Concert" which was made in 1935...
-danishpride1 (2009)

**
This reminds me of the Mickey Mouse cartoon "Band concert" where Donald sells ice cream and then continues to disturb Mickeys concert by playing "Turkey in the straw" on a flute.
-Quietschquatsch (2009)

**
do yo chain hang low do it wobble to and fro?"

i gotta say the 1942 version of this tune is better
-St3veIrwin (2009)

**
who would have guess that this would be used in a hip hop song??
(chain hang low)
-unlimitedisme (2009)

Editor: These comments make referent to a Dec. 2006 hip hop record by Jibbs that is a take off of the children's verse "Do Your Ears Hang Low" or the adult song "Do your balls hang low". All of these songs/rhymes have the same tune as "Turkey In The Straw". The first verse of that record, sung by children, retains many of the words of the children's verse:

Beasta!

Does yo chain hang low
Do it wobble to the flo
Does it shine in the light
Is it platinum, Is it gold
Could you throw it over ya shoulda
If ya hot, to make ya cold
Do your chain hang low

-snip-
In that song "chain" refers to a long necklace that men might wear to show off how much money they have. "Chain" probably also has a sexual connotation in the rest of the song. Suffice it to say, inspite of the fact that there's no profanity in any verses of that song, I don't think that the rest of that song is appropriate for children.

**
Here's more information about the chidren's and adult versions of "Do Your Ears (Balls) Hang Low" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Do_Your_Ears_Hang_Low%3F

"Do Your Ears Hang Low?" is a children's song that is often sung in schools and at camps. The melody of this song was taken from another: "Turkey in the Straw." Various theories exist concerning the origin of the lyrics, but no conclusive evidence seems to exist.

Various versions with alternative lyrics exist, the earliest known version is "Do Your Balls Hang Low",[1] collected in 1941 by Vance Randolph, but not printed by him until 1992 in the book "Randolph, Roll Me in Your Arms". This version is listed in the Roud Folk Song Index under a separate number, 10259. Other versions printed shortly afterwards would suggest that this a rather rude wartime soldiers' song that has made its way into other circles: rugby singing, campfire singing. The original lyric version is also in the Roud Folk Song Index under number 15472."

**
"The music is from "Old Zip Coon". Zip coon was a black face character used to make political commentary in the early 19th century. He was the counterpart to "Jim Crow". The history of both as they were originaly performed is readily available online and the facts will surprise most of you."
-4pointedstar (2009)

Editor: Examples of "Old Zip Coon" are found on this page.

V, W, X

Y, Z

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SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION ON BUCK DANCING
-snip-

As a possible aside, inspired by the "Georgia Buck" songs on this page, here's some information I researched about "Buck Dancing":
"A buck dancer is one who dances the buck-and-wing. From TheDictionary of American Regional English:
"buck-and-wing n, ... Also buck (dance) ... A lively dance usually performed by one person.

1968 Stearns Jazz Dance ".. Buck and Wing--the general designation for tap dance (and almost anything else) at the turn of the century. Introduced on the New Yorkstage in 1880 by James McIntyre, the Buck and Wing began to swing...and launched a new style of Negro-derived dancing.

1977 Nevell Time to Dance-" Buck-dancing is the simplest and yet themost enigmatic kind of southern mountain dancing. Essentially, buck dancing is a dance for one but can be for more than one; the dance itself involves nothing more than moving your feet in time to the music. The origins of buckdancing are unclear. The name probably came from the Indians who may have had a ceremonial dance danced by a brave costumed as a buck deer."

In The Anthropology of Dance, Anya Royce says:
"There existed also a genre that has been labeled "water dances." These, including such named dances as Set the Floor, Buck Dance, and Juba [cf. line in "Mister Charlie"], all involved a test of skill in balancing a glass of water on the head while dancing. Juba and Buck dances appeared as well without the water balancing. ... Emery also claims a long past for the Pigeon Wing and Buck Dance: "the Pigeon Wing and the Buck dance appear as authentic dances of the Negro on the plantation, much before they were picked up for the minstrel shows and billedas the Buck and Wing" (1972:90)."

Buck Dancer's Choice (1966, Wesleyan Univ. Press) is also the title of a volume of poetry by James Dickey, and, according to Blair Jackson in The Golden Road, (Winter, 1984), is an old white mountain tune."
- http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/uncle.html (retrieved January 18, 2011)

-snip-

Here's a video of a White American buck dance champion:

Buckdance | March 06, 2008
Thomas Maupin of Murfreesboro TN taps out the tune at the Mt. Airy Fiddlers Convention.
Musicians: Ron Cole & Jim Burns (Fiddle), Andy Edmonstone (Bass), Phil Jamison (Banjo), Rebecca Keeter & Nancy Mamlin (Guitar)

Here's a question about buck dancing and a response from that video's viewer comment thread:

only just started watching american clogging. really confused- what's the difference with buck dancing, flatfooting and clogging?
-watugot1 (2009)

**
Clogging is a choreographed dance that came around in the 50s to entertain tourists in the Appalachian region. Buck dancing and flatfoot dancing are older freestyle dances with the emphasis on making the sound of the feet complement the music. Buck dancing is used as a general term frequently to describe flatfoot and buck dancing. In contests that have both a flatfoot and buck category the main difference is that the feet have to be kept closer to the floor in the flatfoot contest.
-Buckdance (2009)

-snip-

As a comparison, here's a video of bluegrass clogging:

Posted by allinaday
July 14, 2009

"Way back in 1964, New York filmmaker, David Hoffman was headed down with his new 16mm hand help camera (weight 49 lbs!) to spend three weeks driving the backcountry around Madison County, North Carolina, in the center of Appalachia, with the 82 year old founder of the pioneer Asheville Mountain Music and Dance Festival, Bascom Lamar Lunsford. The resulting film, "Bluegrass Roots" lets you hear and experience the hard scrabbling, dirt road real people sounds that dominated the back country of the southern mountains 40 years ago. It presents a string of the most extraordinary singers, players and dancers the BlueGrass Mountains had to offer. Many later became famous. Some were never heard from again. Most of the songs are classics, including Lunsford's own tune, "Mountain Dew." This scene was filmed at Bascom's home with a local dance group came to dance in Bascom's living room.

-snip-

Some types of New Orleans second line (parade) dancing is called "buck jumping". "Buck jumping" same thing "buck dancing" or perhaps it is an evolution of "buck dancing". Here's a video of "buck jumping"

Women of Class 2009 Second Line Parade- The Sidewalk Masters

Women of Class 2009 Second Line Parade- The Sidewalk Masters

Posted by BigRedCotton; November 15, 2009

“Women of Class SA&PC 2009 Second Line Parade featuring the Hot 8 Brass Band and a side of some of the best random second line dancing you'll ever see - MASTERS!”

-snip-

At least some forms of Buck dancing are referred to as "krumping". Some krumping moves appears to have evolved from hio hop break dancing. Perhaps "krumpin" is another name for buck dancing, I know to little about it to hazard an opinion. Here's a link to a YouTube video of krumping: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLi14OwgJDQ&feature=related THA SESSION - LET'S BUCK!

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